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Full text of "Annual reports"

1988 



338th ANNUAL REPORT 
of the 
TOWN OFFICERS 





ABOUT THE COVER 



The history of the building occupied by The First 
Parish Unitarian goes back to 1789* It w,as designed as 
a meeting house and upon its completion church services 
and all town business were conducted there. In 1839 
the building was restructured to create a second story, 
and the portico of six Doric columns was added to the 
south side to give it a Greek Revival appearance. A 
new bell tower and a spire were added as well. A new 
town clock was installed in 1861 . It is particularly 
noteworthy that Lowell Mason, native son, was choir 
director there at age 16. The Church is pictured here 
in celebration of the construction of its new steeple, 
just 50 years after the collapse of the predecessor 
steeple in the 1938 hurricane, and in preparation for 
the building's 200th anniversary in 1989. 



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Mil 
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ly by the 
papers ex 



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1988 
pecte 



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for loc 

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own of 

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d to tak 



Pond i 
uilt in 
meadow t 
und. Th 
e for th 
he water 
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this 1 
anying 1 
eting, 
e place 



s a M 
1702 by 
o raise 
is resu 
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power 
rs . Th 
the fac 
andmark 
and was 
with th 
in 1989 



edfield 

Joseph 

a mill 

lted in 

which 

needed 

e Grist 

t that 

site , 

voted 

e final 



The two pen-and-ink sketches are the work of 
self-taught artist and former Selectman Walter M. 
Frank, who gets his greatest enjoyment in art works 
from doing renderings of Medfield buildings of today or 
times past, in oils, acrylics or pen-and-inks . 



338th Anniversary 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 
TOWN OFFICERS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1988 




Pauline McKinnon Goucher 
Administrative Assistant 

1960 to Present 



This report is dedicated to Pauline for her 
caring and dedicated work in the 
preparation of not only this town report, 
but for the numerous ones in the past. As 
a native of Medfield, she has a firm 
commi ttment that this report 
of the town and should be 
informative- For all that 
behalf of the town, and for 



be a history 
accurate and 
she does in 
all that she 



is, our sincere thanks and gratitude. 



Ann 8. Thompson, Chairman 
Robert J. Larkin, Clerk 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



(Sin ^fflJemtfrtam 



JOHN D. WILLIAMS 
Water and Sewer Commissioner 1949 - 1988 

MYRON H. SMITH 
Finance Committee 1961 - 1966 
Water and Sewer Commissioner 1941 - 1961 

EDMUND P. HAMMOND 
Animal Control Study Committee 1978 - 1979 
Conservation Commission 1977 - 1978 

WALTER F. REYNOLDS, SR. 
Fire Chief 1964 - 1970 
Police Officer 1935 - 1937 
Building Code Committee 1966 - 1970 

F. GORDON YARLOTT 
Planning Board 1970 - 1972 
Development and Industrial Commission 1955 - 1968 

NANCY L. CODISPOTI 
Historical Commission 1982 - 1988 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreports1988medf 



FACTS ABOUT M EDFIELD 



Population as of January 1, 1988 10,218 

Assessed Valuation 1988 $507,183,801 

Tax Rate 7/1/87 - 6/30/88 15.65 

7/1/88 - 6/30/89 10.20 

Area 14.43 Square Miles 

Miles of Highway 69-76 

Elevation at Town Hall approvimately 180 feet above mean sea 
level . 

Medfield is in the following Voting Districts: 

4th District ' Barney Frank 

Representative to Congress 437 Cherry Street 

Newton, MA 02165 

2nd District Christopher A. Ianello, Jr. 

Governor's Councillor 111 Perkins Street 

Boston, MA 

1st Suffolk and Norfolk District Arthur J. Lewis, Jr. 

State Senator 339 Pond Street 

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 

13th Norfolk District Lida Harkins 

Representative House of Representatives 

State House - Room 257 
Boston, MA 02133 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

United States Senators Edward M. Kennedy 

J.F.K. Memorial Building 
Boston, MA 02203 

John Kerry 

J.F.K. Memorial Building 

Boston, MA 02203 

Number of Registered Voters as of December 31 , 1988: 

Democ rats 1452 
Republicans 1544 
Independents 3661 

TOTAL 6657 



ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN OFFICERS 





MODERATOR 


Term Expires 


Ralph C. Copeland 


TOWN CLERK 


19B9 


Nancy J. Preston 


TREASURER 


1991 



Edward F. Barrett, Jr. 



1990 



Nancy J. Preston 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



1989 



Ann B. Thompson 
Robert J. Larkin 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 



SELECTMEN 



1989 
1990 
1991 



Susan N. Thornton 
Carole A. Rossi 
William D. Walsh 



ASSESSORS 



1989 
1990 
1991 



SCHOOL C0M1ITTEE 



Gay W. D'Amaro 
William A. Ha j jar 
Robert A. Kinsman 
F. Paul Quatramoni 
Teresa Fannin 



1989 
1989 
1990 
1990 
1991 



TRUSTEES OF Tl-E PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Richard M. Fitzpa trick 
Michael T . Howard 
Maura McNicholas 
Barbara J. Stephenson 
David Allen 
Ann Williams 



1989 
1989 
1990 
1990 
1991 
1991 



FLAWING 80ARD 



Margaret E. Bancroft 
John Gagliani 
Joseph D. Codispoti 
E. Lawrie Rhoads 
Joseph R. Parker, Jr. 



1989 
1990 
1991 
1992 
1993 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 



Will iam J. Heller 
Robert W. Miller 
Mary V. Gill is 
Margaret Maider 
Scott J.Dube 



1989 
1989 
1990 
1990 
1990 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



Ralph K. Maider, Jr. 

Diane Nightingale 

Cecilia M. Haney, State Appointed 

Arthur L. Farrar 

Richard M. Denton 



1989 
1990 
September 10, 1991 
1992 
1993 



FIRE CHIEF 
Joesph E. Ryan 

CHIEF OF POLICE 
William H. Mann 



Ronald E. Kerr 



SERGEANTS 
George W. Kir>^sburv 



Raymond T . Wheelei 



POLICE OFFICERS 



Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
Raymond fi. Burton 
Patrick J. Caulfield 
Dana Friend 
John T. Garvey, Jr. 



Stephen P. Grover 
John Mayer 
Thomas P. McNiff 
Robert E. Naughton 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 



John W. Wilhelmi 



PERrtf^ENT INTERMITTENT POLICE OFFICERS 



Joseph G. Cavanaugh 
Lorna C\ Fabbo 
Shawn Garvey 
Richard Kelcourse 
Vincent M. Liociardi 
Shirley M. Rossi 
Brian J. Scully 



Patrick W. Clancy 
Ruth E. Gaff ay 
Robert G. Hudson 
Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr, 
Ronald J. Pucpolo 
Doreen Ryan 
Daniel J. Sicard 



Paul J. Sullo 



8 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
SELECTMEN 

(ail appointments expire 1969 unless otherwise stated) 

TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 
Michael J. Sullivan 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Kenneth P. Feeney 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Michael J. Sullivan 

TOWN COUNSEL 
Charles Fuller, Jr. 



William A. Tosches 
Edward 3. Toomey 
Neil D. MacKenzie 



BOARD OF l-EALTH 



1989 
1990 
1991 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



David F. McCue 
Eric W. O'Brien 
Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 



1989 
1990 
1991 



WATER AND SEWER COMMISSIONERS 



Geoffrey Sauter 

Peyton March 

Lei and D. Beverage 

Thomas Williams, Associate Member 

John D. Williams, Associate Member 



1989 
1990 
1991 
1989 
1989 



9 



SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 
Edward M. Hinkley 

TREE WARDEN 
Edward M. Hinkley 

FIELD DRIVER AND FENCE VIEWER 
John P. O' Toole 

DOG OFFICER 

Louise Papadoyiannis 
Jennifer Shaw-Verrochi , Assistant 

INSPECTOR OF ANim_S 

Karen MacGregor 
Wilbur M. Salter, D.V.M. , Assistant 

POUND KEEPER 
Roy Owen 

INSPECTION DEPARTrtNT 

John P. O' Toole, Inspector of Buildings 
Anthony Calo, Local Inspector of Buildings 

Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 
John A. Rose, Jr., Assistant Gas Inspector 

John A. Rose, Jr., Plumbing Inspector 
Peter Navis, Assistant Pluirbing Inspector 

Joseph F. Erskine, Wiring Inspector 

Tauno O. Aalto, Assistant Wiring Inspector 

James J. Leonard, Assistant Wiring Inspector 

OFFICIAL GREETER OF THE TOWN OF MbDFIELD 
Joseph L. Marcionette 



10 



OFFICIAL KEEPER OF THE TOWN CLOCK 



Austin C. Buchanan 



Edward M. Hinkley, Assistant 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 



William H. Dunlea, Jr. 
Mary I. MairEtienne 
Roberta Kolsti 



19C9 
1990 
1991 



VETERANS' DEPARTMENT 

Paul F. Curran, Director, Agent, Burial Agent 
G. Marshall Chick, Graves Officer 



COLLECTOR OF WATER AND SEWER USE CHARGES 
Nancy J. Preston 



Patricia A. Rioux 

MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 
Patricia A. Rioux 

PUBLIC WEIGHER 
Patricia A. Rioux 



CONSTABLES AND KEEPERS OF THE LOCK UP 



Richard D. Bishop 
Raynorjd M. Burton, Jr 
Robert W. Brady 
Patrick J. Caulfield 
Robert Currie 
Dana Friend 
John 1 . Garvey 
Shawn Garvey 
Stephen H. Grover 
Ronald E. Kerr 



George W. Kingsbury 
Thomas M. LaPlante, 
William H. Mann 
John Mayer 
Thomas McNiff 
Robert E. Naughton 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 
RaymofKl J. Wheeler- 
John Wilhelmi 



Jr. 



11 



POLICE MATRONS 



Jessie A. Erskine 
Elizabeth R. Hinkley 
Priscilla J. Mahoney 
Mary I. MairEtienne 



Elisabeth T. Mann 
Carol Ann Palmieri 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Mary Solari 



Leo Acera 
Albert Banna 
Edwin Bettencourt 
Lawrence Brackett 
Leo N. Brennan 
Herbert Burr 
William A. Carlson 
Herbert M. Carr 
Jonathan M. Carroll 
Vincent Cellucci 
Joseph Concannon 
Robert E. Currie 
William J. Davis 
Robert Dixon 
Kenneth Dunbar 
William J. Dwyer 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 

David C. Egy 
Robert Eklund 
Jeffrey M. Farrell 
Thomas Hamano 
Patrick Harris 
John Holmes 
David J. Holt 
William D. Jones 
Alfred Leverone 
James Love joy 
Roderick MacLeod 
David R. McComell 
William Meau 
Paul J. Murphy 
Linda Myers 
Rene Neveux 



Frank S. Newell 
Peter Opanasets 
Stephen K. Plympton 
Robert J. Shannon 
Carl Sheridan 
Paul Sicard 
uhar les H. Stone, Jr 
John F. Sullivan 
J. Robert Tosi 
William Treefol 
Scott Vaughan 
Armando Viera, Jr. 
Thomas Walsh 
Thomas Ward 
Alan F. Washkewits 



TRAFFIC SUPERVISORS 



Bruce A. Berry 
Vincent M. Cellucci 
Charles Coffone 
James Gibson 
Jonathan Gifford 
Joseph Harkins, III 
Elizabeth R. Hinkley 
Eric Jones 
Valerie Jones 
George Katapodis 
Edward Kerwin, Sr. 
Priscilla J. Mahoney 
Elisabeth Mann 
William J. Marchand, Jr. 
Robert McGrath 



Neal J. O'Connor 
Armando 8. Palmieri 
Carol Ann Palmieri 
Gene Pi ken 
Greg Plesh 
Leo J. Prince 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Warren Robinson 
John Rogers 
Shirley M. Rossi 
Mary L. Solari 
Thomas Tabarani 
Herbert Talerman 
John E. Varnum, Jr. 



Armando R. Viera, Jr. 

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OFFICER 
Pauline M. Goucher 



12 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Carl J. Brewer April 1989 

Adeline H. Cochrane April 1990 

Ben B. Korbly April 1990 

Pat Whitney April 1991 

Arthur L. Farrar April 1991 

Madeleine I. Harding, Associate Member April 1989 

Nancy C. Munroe, Associate Member April 1*?89 

Annie M. Rogers, Associate Member April 1989 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING - SUBDIVISION CONTROL 

Robert F. Sylvia April 1989 

Burgess P. Standley April 1990 

Ralph C. Good, Jr. April 1991 

Sandra G. Munsey, Associate Member April 1989 

Charles H. Peck, Associate Member April 1989 

Bernard J. Monbouquette, Associate Member April 1989 



AQUIFER PROTECTION BYLAW COMMITTEE 

Margaret E. Bancroft John Beale 

Charles F. Fuller Kenneth P. Feeney 

Peyton March Neal McKenzie 

Bernard J. Monbouquette Michael J. Sullivan 



ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS COMMITTEE 

Pauline A. Coulter Robert Coulter 

Beverly Hallowell Bruno J. Palumbo 

Christie A. Shoop Michael J. Sullivan 



COUNCIL ON ARTS 

Patricia Cook Wendy Clarridge Corkum 

Mary Ann Hatem Laura Howick 

Francis A. Iafolla Amy E. lmber 

Jeffrey Masters Martha Moon 

Karen Morgan Marie Zack Nolan 

William F. Pope Timothy Ryan 

Linda Vaughan 
Rosalie Shirley, Associate Stephen W. Cook, Associate 



MEDF1LLD REPRESENT AT IVE - BAY CIRCUIT GREENBELT 
Jesse Matuson 



13 



BLASTING LEGISLATION COMMITTEE 

Joseph D. Codispoti Philip Maloney 

John P. O'loole Daniel Nye 

Joseph L. Ryan Robert F. Sylvia 



BUSINESS & INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT IMPROVEMENT COMMITTEE 

Fred W. Clarridge Lorraine G. Holland 

Thelma M.Meader Daniel W. Nye 

David Owen Roy C. Watson 



CABLE T.V. COMMITTEE 

C. B. Doub * Robert Gibbs 

William F. Kean 



COMMUNITY CABLE ACCESS COWITTEE 

Libby Allison Robert Gibbs 

William F. Pope Robert K. Sawyer, Jr 

Francesca Stirling Nancy Temple 



CAPITAL BUDGET COMMITTEE 

Margaret E. Bancroft Alexander Bell 

Donald H. Harding Daniel Hogan 

Michael J. Sullivan Nancy Temple 

Ann B. Thompson 



CEMETERY AGENT 
John F. Horgan 

CIVIL DEFENSE 

Vincent M. Cellucci, Director 

John E. Varnum, Jr., Deputy Director 

Thomas Hamano, Underwater Rescue and Recovery 

Patrick S. Harris, Chief Radio Operator 

Judith C. Harris, Radio Operator 

Gene L. Piken, Radio Operator 

Patricia A. Rioux, Shelter Manager 



14 



CIVIL DEFENSE AUXILIARY POLICE OFFICERS 



Vincent M. Cellucci, Deputy Chief 



John E. Varnum, 

Bruce Berry, 

Scott M. Bassett, 



Raymond Burton, Jr. 
Robert E. Currie 
Jonathan Gifford 
Judith C. Harris 
James 1 . Kashalena 
Thomas P. McNiff 
James E. Ryan, Jr. 
Armando R. Viera, Jr. 



Jr. , Captain 

Sergeant 

Range Sergeant 

Eric M. Jones 
Robert S. Gallagher 
Thomas Hamano 
Patrick S. Harris 
John Mayer 
Gene L. Piken 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Leonard Vitale 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING TEAM 



Charles Fuller, Jr. 
Stephen Buck lev 



Paul Williamson 
Michael J. Sullivan 



Ann B. Thompson 



COMMUNITY GARDENS COMMIT"TE£ 



Aldo D'Angelo 
McClure E. Ellsworth, 
Harvey Hoover 
Roy Owen 



II 



Carol Dennison 
Valerie Ellsworth 
David L. Owen 
Harold Pritoni 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Ann Lee Howell 

Robert A. Kinsman 

Jesse L. Matuson 

David H. Morrish, Treasurer 

Douglas S. Sparrow, Chairman 

Craig Harwood 

Caroline Standley 

Stephen 8assett, Associate Member 

John H. Beale, Associate Member 

Iheresa Cos, Associate Member 

Daniel V. Fritzsohe, Associate Member 

Betty A. Kaerwer , Associate Member 

Hanson C. Robbins, Associate Member 



April 


1989 


April 


1969 


April 


1990 


April 


1991 


April 


1991 


April 


1991 


April 


1991 


April 


1989 


April 


l'y89 


April 


1989 


April 


1939 


April 


1989 


April 


1989 



CONSTABLE FOR ELECTIONS 
Nancy J . Preston 



15 



CONTRACT COMPLIANCE OFFICER 
Michael J. Sullivan 

SPECIE. COUNSEL 
Robert F. Sylvia 



DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



Paul E. Hinkley 
Ann EJ. Thompson 
Robert J. Lark in 
Harold F. Pntoni, Jr. 



April 1989 
April 1989 
April 1990 
April 1991 



Kenneth Chi Ids 
Kenneth P. Feeney 



DRAINAGE STUDY COrMITTEE 



Robert E. Kennedy 



Robert A. Kinsman 
William H. Mann 



EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES RESPONSE COMMITTEE 

Robert E. Currie William H. Mann 

Robert E. Meaney, Jr. Joseph E. Ryan 

James D. Sullivan, M.D. Michael J. Sullivan 

Joan Kiessling, Alternate 



Vincent Cellucci 
Robert Kinsman 
Ann B. Thompson 
Michael J. Sullivan 



EMERGENCY PLANNING COMMISSION 



Kenneth P. Feeney 
William H. Mann 
Joseph E. Ryan 
Edward J. Toomey 



John P. 0' Toole 



ENFORCING OFFICER FOR ZONING 



Anthony Calo, Assistant 



FAIR HOUSING OFFICER 
Michael J. Sullivan 



16 



FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 



Richard Goodwin 
Robert G. Stokes 



Arlene D. Sarrford, resigned 
Rev. Robert L. Wood 



FIf*¥MCIAL MANAGEMENT STUDY COrfilTTEE 



Edward F. Barrett, Jr 
waiter M. Frank 
Sandra G. Munsey 



Nancy J. Preston 
Susan Thornton 
Paul Williamson 



William Neeb, Resigned 
Michael J. Sullivan, Ex Officio 



STUDY COMMITTEE TO DEVELOP 458 MAIN STREET 



Jane B. Archer 
Francis lafolla 
Thelma Spicer 



Margaret Bancroft 
Walter Frank 
Roy C. Watson 



HAZARDOUS WASTE COORDINATOR 
John H. Beale 



HAZARDOUS WASTE COMMITTEE 



John H. Beale 
David Burkitt 
Jesse L. Matuson 



David 8ivolcic 
Deborah Clancy Dunphy 
Donald R. Senger 



HISTORIC DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 



Robert Mannino 
Donald McDonald 



Carol Thompson 
David Lodge 



John Hooper 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



Electa Kane Tritsch 

Eleanor M. Anes 

Robert J. Mannino 

Ann S. Mentzer 

Paul E . N/ren 

Donald J. MacDonald 

David L. Wilmarth 

Robert Blair, Associate Member 

Nancy L. Codispoti , Associate Member, deceased 

Robert A. Dellaselva, Associate Member 

Richard P. DeSorgher, Associate Member 

Patricia Fontecchio, Associate Member 

Joyce Goodwin, Associate Member 

John Fiooper, Associate Member 

David Temple, Associate Member 



April 


1989 


April 


1990 


April 


1990 


April 


1990 


April 


1991 


April 


1991 


April 


1991 


April 


1989 


April 


198*? 


April 


1989 


April 


1989 


April 


1989 


April 


1989 


April 


1989 


April 


1989 



17 



Margaret O'Brien 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Georqe Bond 



HOME OWNERSHIP PROGRAM COMMITTEE 



Richard Denton 



Joseph Savilonis 
Arm B. Thompson 
Bonnie Wren-Burgess 



N. Benjamin Aldrich 
Karl Lord 
Sherry Savilonis 



HOUSING PARTNERSHIP COMMITTEE 



Margaret E. Bancroft 
Steven Nolan 
Fayre Stephenson 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT FINANCING AUTHORITY 



Charles H. Peck 
Ann Lee Howell 
Stephen Buckley, Jr. 
Robert J. McCarthy 
Pauline M. Goucher 



April 1989 
April 1990 
April 1991 
April 1992 
April 1993 



INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Charles W. Jenks, Jr. 



Kenneth P. Feeney 
weston G. Kolsti 
Eric 0'8rien 



Edward J. MacDonald 



Joseph B. McWilliams 



LAND MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 



Daniel Hogan 
Robert Miller 
Clarence Purvi* 



Michael J. Sullivan 

LOCAL AUCTION PERMIT AGENT 
Pauline M. Goucher 

LOCAL WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT OFFICIAL 
Kenneth P. Feeney 

MEDFIELD DESIGNEE - MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 
Michael J. Sullivan 



18 



MEDFIELD-NDRFOLK PRISON PROJECT SCREENING COMMITTEE 

Arthur L. Farrar 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



Margaret E. Bancroft 



August 3, 1989 



Paul F. Curran 
James T . Moym han 
Albert J. Manganello 
Jrene 0' loole 



MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 



James Tubridy 



Robert J. Larkin 
William H. harm 
Frank Mayer 
Joseph F . Ryan 



Richard DeSorgher 
David Temple 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEMORIALS 



Robert Kinsman 
Patricia Walsh 



MINORITY BUSINESS ENTERPRISE OFFICER 
Pauline M. Goucher 

MUNICIPAL CENSUS SUPERVISOR 
Nancy J. Preston 

REPRESENTATIVE TO THE NORFOLK COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 

OPEN SPACE PLANNING COMMITTEE 



Margaret E. Bancroft 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
Jesse L . Matuson 



Eric W. O'Brien 
Hanson C. Robbing 
Martha L. Smick 



Michael J. Sullivan 



PARKING CLERK AND HEARING OFFICER 
Nancy J. Preston 



19 



PESTICIDE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Ellis N. Allen John H. Beale 

Edward Hinkley William M. Jackson 

Graeme Justice Robert A. Kinsman 

Alan D. Paul 



PUBLIC WORKS PROJECTS COMMITTEE 

Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. Kenneth P. Feeney 

Donald Harding Robert J. Larkin 

Michael J. Sullivan 



RECYCLING COmiTTEE 

Barbara Donnelly Cheryl Dunlea 

Kenneth Feeney Cynthia Greene 

John Moon Rosemary O'Brien 

Elly Pendergast Joan Snow 

David Temple William J. Tragaki* 



JOINT REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE 
Daniel L. Jones, Jr. 

ACTING RIGHT-TO-KNOW COORDINATOR 
Edward J. Toomey 

SAFETY COMMITTEE 

Jane 8. Archer Marguerite M. Eppich 

Kenneth P. Feeney Pauline M. Goucher 

Daniel Hogan 

SEWER PLANT LIAISON COMMITTEE 

Deborah Abazorius Peyton March 

Leland Beverage John Mayer 

SOUTH STREET COMMITTEE 

Edward J. Brabazon Sarsfield Brennan 

Daniel Fr ltzche Joseph Parker 

David F. Temple 



20 



THREE RIVERS INTERLOCAL COUNCIL (MAPC) 
Margaret Bancroft Michael J. Sullivan 

TRAvBFER STATION LIAISON COMMITTEE 
Kenneth M. Chi Ids, Jr. Kenneth P. Feeney Michael J. Sullivan 



YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



Mary Conant 

Gay W. D'Amaro 

Jeff Digiovami 

Joseph J . DiGiovanni 

Mary V. Gillis 

Brian W. Ha j jar 

David Ha j jar 

William J. Heller 

Ed Kim 

Thomas M. LaPlante 

John Livingston 

David Logsdon 

Thomas G. O'Leary, Jr. 

Paul Robinson 

Dan Sweeney 

Michael T. Sweeney 

Simon Towers 

Robert W. Wallace 



September 30, 1989 

September 30, 1989 

September 30, 1989 

September 30, 1989 

September 30, 1989 

September 30, 1989 

September 30, 1989 

September 30, 1989 

September 30, 1989 

September 30, 1989 

September 3G, 1989 

September 30, 1989 

September 30, 1989 

September 30, 1989 

September 30, 1989 

September 30, 1989 

Septmeber 30, 1989 

September 30, 1989 



21 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
TAX COLLECTOR 

DEPUTY COLLECTORS 
Peter Bartkewicz June h. Doucette Nancy Griffin 

APOINTMENTS MADE BY 
ASSESSORS 

Stanley E. Bergeron, Assistant Assessor 
Irene Hartling, Assistant Assessor 
rtarjone (i. Tannple, Assistant Assessor 

APOINTMENTS MADE BY 
TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Irene L. O' Toole, Assistant Accountant 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
TOWN CLERK 

Nancy S. Franke, Assistant Town Clerk 
Frederick A. Rogers, Jr. , Assistant Hearing Officer 

VOCATIONAL 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Appointed by Chairman of Selectmen, Chairman of the School Committee and 
the Moderator 

Albert G. Chouinard June 30. 1989 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
FIRE CHIEF 

Ellis N. Allen, Deputv Fire Chief 
Charles; G. Seavey, tap tain 
Clinton M. Clark, Lieutenant 
George DeVenanzi , Lieutenant 
William Kingsbury, Lieutenant Clerk 



22 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
BOARD OF HEALTH 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO THE OUTREACH PROGRAM 

Lois Cardell April 1989 

William H. Mann April 1989 

Diane Wallace-Sangren April 1989 

Lois Lambert April 1989 

William A. Tosches April 1989 

Ihomas M. Reis, Associate Member April 1989 



AGENTS 

William R. Domey, P.E., Engineer /Agent April 1989 

John J. Keefe, R.S. , Milk Inspector/Agent Ppril 1989 

Mae L. Otting, Administrative Assistant April 1989 



BOARD OF HEALTH ADVISORY COMMITTEE , 

Jean P. Clark A. Ritchey Stagg, M.D. 

Madeleine I. Harding James D. Sullivan, M.D. 

Nancy C. Kashalena Rev. Robert L. Wood 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
MODERATOR 

Tidal 8. Henry 



WARRANT COMMITTEE 

Michael Kosc April 1989 

Stephen Buckley, Jr. April 1989 

Clarence A. Purvis April 1989 

Thompson Lingel April 1990 

Matthew F. Schmid Apr ll 1990 

Nancy Temple April 1990 

Robert Geiger April 1991 

Edith A. Beale April 1991 

itorvild H. Harding t^p; ii 1991 



23 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



John D'Angelo, Jr. 
Thomas N. Fannin 
Paul J. Williamson 



November 30, 1989 
November 30, 1990 
November 30, 1991 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
PERSONNEL BOARD 



COMPENSATION SUBCOMMITTEE 



William A. Najjar 
Ann B. Thompson 



Neal R. Olsen 
Paul J. Williamson 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
TREASURER 

Marguerite M. Eppich, Assistant Treasurer 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY 
PLANNING BOARD 

MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



Daniel 


L . Jones , Jr . 




June 


28, 


1989 


David G. Strimaitus 




June 


28, 


1989 


Newton 


H . Thompson 




June 


28, 


1989 


Connie 


Jones 




June 


28, 


1990 


Martha 


L. Smick 




June 


28. 


1990 


Joseph 


C. Donnelly, Jr. 




June 


28, 


1991 


Marion 


L. Wasserman 


SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 


June 


28, 


1991 


Deanna 


Egelston 




January 


15, 


1990 


Philip 


P . Bonanno 




January 


15, 


1991 


Newton 


H. Thompson 




January 


15, 


1991 


Joseph 


R. Parker 




January 


15. 


1992 


Richard Moon 




January 


15, 


1992 



24 



DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1988 



25 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Residents of Medfield: 

We reorganized in March for the ensuing year and elected 
Ann B. Thompson chairman, Robert J. Larkin clerk and welcomed 
Harry F. Pritoni, Jr. as third member. 

CHANGES IN COMMUNITY 

During 1988, we witnessed more changes in the center of 
Medfield and the immediate vicinity than heretofore. 

On June 30th, the steeple was raised on the First Parish 
Unitarian Church, almost fifty years after the Hurricane of '38 
which occurred on September 21, when the steeple was blown 
down. The town clock which is housed in this First Meeting 
House was refurbished with interest from the funds from the An- 
tiquities Trust, established with funds from the 325th Anniver- 
sary celebration. In August, the Selectmen voted to establish 
a fund to have the town clock strike once again. Twenty-five 
years ago, prior to the clock being electrified in 1963» the 
town clock striking the hour was a part of Medfield and a part 
we hope we can recapture. 

Townspeople witnessed the move of the parish house of the 
United Church from its location at Miller Street and Main 
Street to its new home on Brook Street. It was transformed 
into an office condominium and the United Church began work on 
its addition. 

New condominiums were approved on Brook Street, Medfield 
Crossing on Main Street and Prentiss Place on North Street. 

All of the above have transformed the face of the center. 

Live telecasts of the Selectmen's meetings commenced on 
September 27th. From all reports, it has become a favorite on 
Tuesday nights. Appreciation is extended to the Cable Commit- 
tee members for their work and their continuing efforts. Vol- 
unteers are needed to continue the weekly event. 

PUBLIC WORKS 

Public works matters occupied much of the agenda during 
the year, not the least of which was an emergency situation 
which existed in early summer, following excessive heat which 
resulted in drought conditions. The Water and Sewerage Board 
voted on June 14th to issue a water ban when daily use of water 
increased from 900,000 gallons per day to 2.4 million gallons. 

The Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) 
switched i_ts focus for a residuals management facility (sludge 
dumping) site from Walpole near route 109 to a site in 
Walpole/Norfolk adjacent to the prison facility which would 
also have an adverse effect on our future water supply because 



26 



of its proximity to the Stop River. On December 6, 1988 we 
voted to support town officials in Norfolk and Walpole in their 
efforts to discourage location of the sludge dump in their 
towns because of the almost certain adverse impact on water 
supplies. A decision is still pending. 

On April 5, we voted to award a contract to Wheelabrator 
Millbury, Inc. to accept our solid waste for a twenty-year pe- 
riod. A decision was necessary as the option would not be 
available in the future. 

Ojj r Recycling Study Committee continued its efforts to re- 
cycle solid waste and recommended that we sign a letter of in- 
tent to participate in the Town of Millis' study for a future 
material recycling facility (MRF) to be located in this area. 

Our Water and Sewerage Board obtained a state planning 
grant of $55,800. to design sludge improvements at the 
wastewater treatment plant to solve odor problems which have 
been p re va len t . 

On June 28th DEQE advised the Town's landfill was included 
on a list of landfills they found dangerous to the environment. 
Efforts on our behalf to have Medfield removed from this list 
have not been successful. We believe the designation is un- 
founded but DEQE has not yet provided regulations to allow us 
to make a formal appeal. 

We took action at the annual town meeting to acquire land 
to protect well number four but regrettably, the DEQE did not 
approve the acquisition of the land for public water supply 
protection. We will continue to pursue this acquisition. 

Following a recommendation from our Hazardous Waste Com- 
mittee, Shell Oil Company was asked to begin a program of 
monitoring the town wells located near a Shell pipeline. 



On July 12th DEQE approved an additional 
$842,720. for the Harding Street sewer interceptor 
for Pine Street sewers are still pending. 



grant of 
The funds 



In accordance with a vote of town meeting, we purchased an 
option to acquire the Barletta land consisting of 16.5 acres on 
North Meadows Road adjacent to our transfer station at a cost 
of $21,600. for a total price of $500,000. Favorable action 
at the 1989 annual town meeting will ensure the Town that land 
would be available for future public works use. 

On September 20, 1988 on recommendation of the Water and 
Sewerage Board we voted unanimously to terminate the septage 
agreement between the Town of Medfield and the Town of Dover 
giving them one year's notice to take action prior to September 
20, 1989. 

In July the first full time cemetery superintendent was 
hired, following manv decades of part time service by the 
Roberts and Mitchell families. The Town is indebted to the 
latter men who took pride in the condition and appearance of 
our cemeterv. 



27 



In October we voted to request that the Norfolk County En- 
gineers provide drainage plans for Adams Street, Bridge Street, 
Spring Street and Harding Street at West Street. 

During the year, the town participated in a prison labor 
program utilizing prisoners from the Department of Corrections 
Medfield Prison Project who worked at the cemetery, town hall, 
the Pfaff Center and the school department. This resulted in a 
savings to the town and resulted in many projects being com- 
pleted which we would have had to defer for lack of funding. 

Legislation was filed to regulate blasting but the legis- 
lation failed and will be refiled for 1989 session of the Leg- 
islature. 



A 
f e r a 
ad j ace 
Boa rd 
housin 
Study 
appoin 
Housin 
rental 
with 
to ad 
commit 
permit 
for $3 
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t the 1988 
pp roxima te 
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to sell th 
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Committee 
ted two co 
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housing 
recommenda 
opt compre 
tee as the 

process . 
0,000. to 
he town to 



annual town me 
ly three acres 
wn property to 
e land for $1 . 
ng a recommenda 
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and after much 
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negotiating re 
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go forward. 



et ing, t 
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ocated on Dal 
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oting on Decern 
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to trans- 
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e income 
apter 774 
uently we 
f f ordable 
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he board 
ber 13th 
ting the 
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MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL 



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1988 of 
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28 




Thomas Murphy presenting his Eagle Scout project to the Selectmen. 




Selectman Larkin waiving to citizens at Christmas Parade 



29 



completion of the improvements in the Fall of 1992. Plans will 
include upgrading of the buildings, utilities, the road system, 
and mothballing some buildings. They do not plan to include 
any new construction. Our efforts to keep abreast of this 
important matter will continue into 1989, bearing in mind the 
safety and well-being of the community. 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

1988 saw several changes in our police department. A 
dedicated officer, Anthony Bertone, was retired in March due to 
a disability. On the last day of the year we regretfully 
learned of the resignation of Detective John T. Garvey after 
twenty years of outstanding service. Jack was the Town's first 
Detective whose expertise resulted in the solution to many 
crimes, and more importantly his work as safety officer and 
programs in the school department had a favorable effect on 
many young people. We extend our appreciation to these fine 
men . 

The Town Meeting approved a new safety officer. During 
the year, three new full time officers were employed and we 
welcome John Wilhelmi, Thomas McNiff and Ray M. Burton, Jr. 
Officer McNiff became the safety officer and has increased sur- 
veillance of motorists, establishing a reputation for Medfield 
that drivers must be cognizant of motor vehicle laws! Officer 
McNiff and his fellow officers are to be commended. Officers 
are required to attend the police academy and Officers Wilhelmi 
and Burton excelled, Officer Burton receiving the highest rank 
in the class . 

COMMITTEE REPORT 

Several new committees were appointed. The Committee to 
Study the Financial Management continued its work and recom- 
mended a charter change to combine the positions of Collector 
and Treasurer and to create a new position of Town Accountant 
which will be voted upon at the next annual town meeting. This 
reflects a need based on the growth of our Town. 

The Memorial Study Committee was reactivated to make rec- 
ommendations for a policy for the future. They recommended a 
bylaw be adopted to regulate naming of streets which will be in 
the annual town meeting in 1989* 

An Historic District Study Committee was appointed and af- 
ter considerable research, submitted a report and article to 
establish the John Metcalf District on the westerly end of Main 
Street, which will be acted upon at the 1989 annual town meet- 
ing. 

The Council on Arts opened the Zullo Gallery on Main 
Street, named after the late Alfred Zullo whose family still 
owns the building and cooperated in this fine endeavor. On Oc- 
tober 8, 1988 we proclaimed Council on Arts Day in recognition 
of this innovation in our Town. 

Planning continued for the Town Common adjacent to the 
Public Library on the former St. Edward's Church property. We 



30 



applied for a grant from the state and while we were virtually 

assured of funds, we learned late in the year that they will 

not be available. We will proceed with town funds in the 
Spring of 1989. 

LIGHTING PROGRAMS 

On March 1st we voted to have the town participate in the 
holiday lighting program, previously paid for by the merchants 
through MEMO (Medfield Employers and Merchants Organization) 
who continue to provide this service as well as the popular 
Medfield Day and Christmas Parade. We appreciate their contin- 
ued service to the community. 

As an energy saving measure, we voted after long delib- 
eration and much public input to change the street lighting to 
high pressure sodium. We began this program upon the urging of 
the Boston Edison Company to reduce the need for energy and 
thus the need for additional power plants through the use of 
the new type lighting. The changeover was nearly complete at 
year's end, providing a minimum of 25$ or $10,000. annual sav- 
ings. These savings, in addition to savings established a few 
years ago when street lights were removed according to a public 
safety policy adopted at that time, result in an overall sav- 
ings of approximately 50% in the street lighting budget. 

TOWN HALL 

On April 14 we voted unanimously to observe the no smoking 
regulation promulgated by the Massachusetts Legislature in Town 
Hall and other town buildings. 

The Town Hall's brick was repaired and waterproofed while 
the interior was painted in accordance with our renovation pro- 
gram. 

TRIBUTES 

On May 13th, the Board was saddened to learn of the death 
of Walter F. Reynolds, Sr. In addition to serving as the 
town's first full time Fire Chief. Walter served as a 
firefighter, police officer and school department employee. He 
will be fondly remembered for his contributions to the Town of 
Medfield . 

On September 10th the Town's first Roadside Cleanup Cam- 
paign took place. This resulted from an idea of Rosalie Merski 
who volunteered to chair this event and utilize young people 
for trash pickup. She was ably assisted by the Park and Recre- 
ation Commission and the Superintendent of Public Works who 
provided trash bags and pickup of trash. We hope this will be 
an annual event. 

Representative Barbara Gardner and Senator David Locke 
completed their tenure as our legislators following a 
red is t ric t ing. It is rewarding to note that while they were 
attentive to our needs while we were in their district, they 
have continued to keep us apprised of legislation affecting the 
town since red i s t r i c t ing took effect. 



31 



It was our pleasure to name Alvah H. Downs, County Engi- 
neer, as an honorary citizen of Medfield in recognition of his 
unfailing efforts to respond to the Town of Medfield, which he 
fondly calls "Capital City." Over the past few decades he has 
designed and engineered many, many public works projects. He 
typifies public service at its best. 

Mr. Philip Ford, nephew of the late Blanche Marcionette 
Kingsbury, has generously donated the full size statue of a 
woman which is on the site of the Kingsbury Antique Shop 
overlooking Kingsbury Pond to the Town of Medfield. The town 
is very fortunate that this landmark statue will remain in 
Medfield to be enjoyed by future generations. 

We learned of Harry Mitchell's resignation as Council on 
Aging Director with regret. His interest, concern and person- 
ality are truly missed. 

During the year, Selectman Pritoni represented the board 
on the occasion of the Three Hundredth Anniversary of 
Sturbridge. Sturbridge was settled by early colonists from the 
Town of Medfield. We also were present at the Town of Medway's 
Two Hundredth and Seventy-fifty Anniversary. Medway and 
Medfield were once part of Dedham. 

The town lost another longtime employee at the end of the 
year. Deputy Fire Chief Ellis Allen submitted his resignation 
effective December 31st. Ellis served continuously as a member 
of the Medfield Fire Department for 37 years. On behalf of all 
the townspeople, we would like to commend him for his outstand- 
ing service, both on the Medfield Fire Department and as Tree 
Warden. Ellis comes from a long and proud heritage, as an 
Allen was one of the first thirteen settlers in the Town of 
Medfield, and this will be the first time in many generations 
that an Allen has not been serving the Town of Medfield. 

At year's end we were deeply saddened to learn of the 
death of Jack Williams who worked tirelessly for the Town as a 
Water and Sewer Commissioner for over forty years. His long 
range planning was to a great extent responsible for Medfield's 
modern water and sewer system. He was a humble gentleman, who 
truly loved his Town. He is sorely missed. 

We are grateful for the reputation Medfield enjoys of al- 
ways having the expertise available for new and interesting 
committees. Anyone interested is urged to file a Talent Bank 
Form which we annually make available in our warrant report. 

Medfield will continue to be the wonderful community in 
which we live because of the people who live here along with 
those who in the past worked tirelessly for Our Town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ann B. Thompson, Chairman 
Robert J. Larkin, Clerk 
Harry F. Pritoni, Jr. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



32 



MEMORIAL DAY ADDRESS 

1988 



Delivered by Vincent A. Palumbo 
Former Captain, U.S. Army Air Corps 
Former Commander, A.L. Beckwith Post 110 
May 30, 1988 



Reverend Ruth Becker, Reverend Father Tony Vasaturo, 
Honored Guests, Gold Star Mothers, Fellow Members of the 
American Legion and V.F.W., Citizens of Medfield, it is an 
honor for me to be here speaking to you on this special 
occasion . 

The custom of decorating graves of those who lost their 
lives in the service to their country began back in the Civil 
War days. Even before the fighting had ended, women in many 
communities in the South, where most of the fighting took 
place, had begun the practice of placing flowers on the graves 
of fallen Confederate soldiers. In most cases this was 
extended to the graves of Union soldiers, who died below the 
Mason-Dixon Line. 

In the years immediately following the end of the war, 
these observances grew spontaneously, with ceremonies being 
conducted in a helter-skelter fashion throughout the country. 
Realizing that the nation was eager to honor those who had died 
in the fighting, General John A. Logan, Commander in Chief of 
the Grand Army of the Republic, issued the following order to 
all Grand Army Posts: 

"The 30th of May 1868, is designated for the purpose of 
strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves 
of comrades who died in the defence of their country 
during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in 
almost every city, village, and hamlet churchyard in the 
land. In this observance, no form of ceremony is 
prescribed, but posts and comrades will in their own way, 
arrange such fitting services and testimonials of respect 
as circumstances may permit." 

120 or as Abe Lincoln would have said it, 6 score 

years ago, today, the first Decoration Day, as it was known 
then, took place, honoring those who died in the Civil War. 
Since that time this observance has been extended to honor all 
those who died in the service of the nation. Today everyone 
thinks of Memorial Day as a time to honor the memory of all 
deceased persons, civilian as well as militarv. 



33 



We are now here today to honor and remember the men of 
Medfield who lost their lives in the service of our country. 
The Honor Roll down at the Legion Hall, shows that 84 men of 
Medfield served in the Civil War. These are the 9 men who lost 
their lives in that war; 



John B. Chenery Richard C. Derby 
William R. Holbrook Curtis W. Jones 
John A. Strang Eugene Sumner 



Allan A. Kingsbury 

Joseph Hardy 

William Vennoh 



Allan A. Kingsbury was Medfield's first volunteer and its 
first casualty. He was killed at Yorktown, Virginia on April 
26, 1862. One hundred .Sixty-four ( 1 64 ) men of Medfield 
answered the call in World War I and the Flag Pole Monument at 
Baxter Park was erected to honor them. These 9 men lost their 
lives in that war; 



Silas Assenault 
Arthur A. Clevercee 
Ralph E. Leighton 
Wesley J. Beckwith 
Harrison R. Rvan 



William M. Beckwith 
Clarance M. Cutler 
Herbert Paine 
Earl J . Kerr 



The American Legion Post No. 110 is named after the 
Beckwith brothers and the square across the street to my right 
is named in honor of Clarance M. Cutler. 



Three hundred Fiftv-nine 



men 



and twentv women 



left 



Medfield to do battle in World War II. The entry hall at the 
Memorial School Houses the honor roll of those who left 
Medfield to serve in this war. There are Gold Stars beside the 
names of these 10 men; 



Vincent Bravo 
Ocran G. Knehr 
Joseph Pace 
Richard C. Werner 
Douglas C. Mackeatchie 



Thomas Clewes 
Earle W. Lee 
John P . Ross , Jr. 
John Crowder 
Robert B. Sproul 



The intersection of Main and South streets is named in 
memory of John P. Ross, Jr. The street connecting Main and 
Pound is named Robert Sproul Road. Of these men I remember 
Vincent Bravo the most. "Zeke", as we called him in those 
days, attended the Medfield Schools and after graduating went 
to work at the brickyard down on West Street, where we now have 
our Industrial Park. Soon after Pearl Harbor "Zeke" enlisted 
in the Army Air Corps. He became a flight engineer on a B26 
bomber and lost his life in action over Germany on June 3 • 
1943. The square at route 109 and 27 is named in his honor. 

The Honor Roll to my right shows that 140 men and 3 women 
of Medfield served in the Korean Conflict. George Snyder was 
the lone casualtv. 



34 



Vietn 

Steph 

stree 

of P 

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1967, 

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membe 
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r Steph 
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e field 
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next 
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any 
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4 al 
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atel 
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Medfield 
, Peter 
eld High 
ted is na 

named a 
arries St 
e was one 
s a smile 
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d town in 
g him hel 
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ty, help 
hit by a 
The day a 
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y after g 
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In closing, 
aud ience , for by 
Medfield, who died 
Country . 



I would like to thank all of you in the 
your presence, you too honor these men of 

time, while serving our 



before their 




Vincent A. Palumbo delivers Memorial Day Address 



35 



STREETS WATER AND 
SEWER DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

The following is my Annual Report for the year ending 

December 31 , 1 988. 

STREET DEPARTMENT 

Resu rf acing : The following streets were either sand 
sealed or stone sealed: Hartford Street, Cottage Street, 
Vinald Road, Mitchell Place, Upham Road, Bridge Street, School 
Street, Granite Street and Rocky Lane. 

Spring Street was grader patched in order to maintain the 
shape of the road and assure good drainage. 

The Highway Department put out a total of 1738 Tons of hot 
top, performing routine maintenance. 

Drainage : The Highway Department replaced 100 ft. of 
drainage at the intersection of Spring Street and South Street 
Extension . 

In the Fall of 1988, with the help of the County 
Engineers, the Highway Department replaced a culvert on North 
Street at the Dover Line with a pair of 36 inch steel culverts. 
We would like to thank William J. Tragakis and Lesley I. Shore 
for their cooperation and patience during the project. 

At the Memorial School the Highway Department installed a 
series of dry wells. 

Sidewalks : At the request of the School Department the 
Highway Department constructed 500 ft. of sidewalk from 
Wheelwright Road to the Memorial School footpath on North 
St reet . 

Land f ill : Final cover was added to Section 2 of the 
Landfill. This is part of an ongoing program which is designed 
to keep final close-out costs at a minimum. 

T ransf er Stat ion : We shipped 2,000 Tons of trash to the 
Millbury incinerator, while the remaining 4,000 Tons were 
buried in our Grove Street Landfill. We also increased our 
recycling efforts by including clear, green and brown glass. 

SNOW 

In 1988 we had 12 storms and 19 callouts for various 
salting and sanding operations. The total snowfall was 
forty-seven and a half inches (47.5"). 



36 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 

The 1988 Town Meeting approved funds to improve the 
handling of solids at the Medfield Wastewater Treatment Plant. 
Among these improvements were a new composting facility, filter 
presses and more aeration. At this time it appears these 
projects will begin in the Spring of 1989. The Medfield WWTP 
treated 284,651,000 gallons of sewage in 1988, of which 
33,570,000 came from the State Hospital. 

We also accepted 725,750 gallons of septage from Medfield 
and an additional 389,000 gallons from Dover. The operators 
continued to attend D.E.Q.E. sponsored seminars in order to 
keep up with latest treatment methods. In July 1988 the WWTP 
started selling electricity to Boston Edison. This program 
generated approximately $3,500 in revenue. 

Total rainfall for 1988, measured at the Treatment Plant, 
was thirty-six and a half inches (36.5 inches). 

In November 1988 Medfield WWTP finished conducting E.P.A. 
mandated bio assays of the Charles River. In 1988 the Medfield 
WWTP continued its high quality treatment!, of sewage and 
maintained an excellent record of no discharge violations. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 



The Water Department pumped 352,879,000 gallo 
in 1988, of which 3,488,250 gallons went to the Sta 
In June 1988 the Town of Medfield was mandated by 
enforce a water ban. This was due to unexpected 
Well #4* In July repairs were completed and a volu 
ban was voted by the Water and Sewerage Board. A t 
consumption for New England area is about 100 
capita per day. Medfield's range during the dry 
about 250 gallons per capita per day. This is at 
watering of lawns, and automotive lawn sprinkler s 
the future great caution must be taken in the use o 



ns of water 
te Hospital . 
D.E.Q.E. to 
repairs to 
nta ry water 
ypical water 
gallons per 
season is 
t ri buted to 
ystems . In 
f our water. 



IN MEMORY 

Late in December of 1988, John Williams passed away from 
injuries sustained in a bicycling accident in 1985. Jack 
served on the Water and Sewerage Board since 1949* The present 
water system is a monument to his dedication to the Town of 
Medfield. Well #4, located off Elm Street, was named and 
dedicated in his honor in 1980, at which time he was praised as 
a quiet unassuming man dedicated to his Town and a founder 
of the Town's excellent water system. Jack will be greatly 
missed by the men of the Water and Sewer Departments, but never 
f o rgo t ten . 

In Conclusion : Appreciation is expressed to secretaries 
Nancy Franke and Debra Greene of the Highway Department. Debra 
took the place of Frances Brennan who moved to Boston after 
having been our secretary for six years. We also welcomed 
Evelyn Clarke, secretary to the Water and Sewer Department, who 
filled Gail Fernandes vacancy. In spite of changes, there has 
been a smooth transition. 



37 



Robert Kennedy, Street Department Foreman, Charles Evans, 
Water and Sewer Department Foreman, and Peter Iafolla, Chief 
Operator of the Treatment Plant, as well as all the men of the 
various departments, are to be commended for their continued 
excellent public service. 

Respectfully submitted 

Kenneth P. Feeney, Superintendent 
OFFICE OF PUBLIC* WORKS 




Downed wires on Route 109 



38 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

PERSONNEL 

Several changes were made again this year. Officer 
Anthony Bertone was injured in the past year and was retired 
March 19, 1988 as a result of the injury. Thomas McNiff of 
Medfield was appointed to replace him and began by attending 
Medford Police Academy from July 7th to October 9th. An 
additional officer authorized by Town Meeting was appointed and 
began in September. Ray Burton of Medfield attended Waltham 
Police Academy from September 6th to December 9th. John 
Wilhelmi, who had been appointed in 1987 and was unable to 
attend recruit academy then, attended the Waltham Police 
Academy also from September to December. Robert Hudson of 
Medfield, a Permanent Intermittent Officer who had also been 
working full time as a Dispatcher since July 1987 was appointed 
as a Provisional Officer and worked full time from April until 
December. John Wilhelmi worked in his place as Dispatcher from 
April until he enrolled in the Waltham Police Academy. Because 
of Officer Bertone's retirement in March, Thomas McNiff was 
also appointed a Provisional Officer in April to replace 
Officer Bertone until he was permanently appointed in July. As 
recommended by Selectmen, we were able to assign one officer to 
devote most of his time to radar and other traffic enforcement. 
Officer McNiff did it from April to July when he entered the 
academy. Officer Burton worked it from August until he entered 
the academy in September and officer McNiff resumed after 
graduating from the Academy in October until the end of the 
year. Officer Burton will assume the job as our first full 
time Safety Officer in late January. The use of one Officer 
this way has been quite successful it appears. We think we 
have slowed traffic speeds considerably by moving the radar 
from place to place throughout the town. The Officer also 
spends time watching for stop sign or traffic light violations 
and spends time at night watching for persons driving under the 
influence of alcohol. 

John T. Garvey, who had been on the Department since 1967 
and who had worked as Detective since 1975 retired December 31 , 
1988. Officer Robert E. Naughton replaces John Garvey as 
detective. I wish the retired Officers, Bertone and Garvey 
good health and good luck and thank them for their 
contributions to me, the Department and the town. Jack Garvey 
will be especially missed because of his knowledge of the law, 
investigative procedures and his quick mind. 

Shirley Rossi began working full time as Dispatcher on 
January 3rd. Neal O'Connor began working as full time 
Dispatcher September 11th when John Wilhelmi attended the 
Academy. We have not been able to fill the position of Intern 
very often during the past several years. 



39 



During 1988, we had an Intern, Thor Mollung from January 
through March. The rest were covered by part time people and 
overtime. I am requesting a fourth full time Dispatcher this 
year. 

TRAINING 

All Officers attended in-service training in Foxboro under 
the direction of the Mass Criminal Justice Training Council. 
As previously noted, three officers attended recruit training. 
Congratulations to those officers on successful completion. 
Officer Burton received an award for finishing number one 
academically. 

EQUIPMENT 

As is customary, 2 cruisers were replaced with new ones. 
One 1986 Ford sedan was replaced with a new Ford sedan and the 
1986 4-wheel drive Bronco was replaced with a new Bronco. I am 
asking again to replace two cruisers. We also replaced 2 
revolving lights on the cruisers that were more than ten years 
old . 

Our computer has been in use about one year and we have 
limited use of it. It appears that we must get software 
specialized for Police. In October, the display unit broke 
down and we haven't gotten a replacement yet. We have been 
checking for a better software package. 

GENERAL 

With the addition of the two officers, the past two years, 
it has between much easier filling shifts and covering 
necessary events. 1989 will probably be the first full year of 
the Safety Officer because of all the past absences and need 
for Officers to attend recruit training. We received $25,495 
court fines in 1988, which is $8,945 more than in 1987. A 
total of 1,036 citations were issued in 1988; 642 of the 
citations were issued by the safety officer during the 18 weeks 
the position was covered. 

I anticipate that the Safety Officer will continue a large 
part of his time on traffic enforcement , but will also be a 
liaison with the school children, check safety of bus stops and 
route with school department and attempt to educate the public 
on safety issues such as bike safety, pedestrian safety, house 
numbering and seat belts. Community groups that wish to help 
or receive help should contact the Safety Officer or me. 

The radio equipment has functioned well as has most other 
department equipment. The station doesn't need any major 
repairs, but as it gets older, maintenance increases. 

The Auxiliary Police assisted in many occasions this year, 
and were a great help moving traffic, especially on Memorial 
Day, Christmas parade, and Medfield Day. Thanks to all who 
helped . 



40 



As this will probably be my last annual report, I wish to 
thank the townspeople for making my job easier because of 
generally cooperating with me and having faith in me and also 
in the Department. I think overall we have been treated with 
much respect and have tried to treat all persons fairly. A 
special thanks to Town Administrator Michael Sullivan, Pauline 
Goucher and all the town employees, department heads, boards 
and commissions and Board of Selectmen for their help and 
cooperation. The whole combination makes it a very good 
community in which to live and work. 

My job in helping keep the community safe has been 
accomplished mainly by the competent help of my entire 
department and I thank them for their cooperation in performing 
their duties ably. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William H. Mann 
POLICE CHIEF 




Chief Mann demonstrates CPR to class 



41 



STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1988 ARE AS FOLLOWS 



Accidents reported 

Personal Injuries 
Pedes t rian 
Fatalities 
Hit and Run 
Bicycles 

Ambulance trips 

Arrests 

Arson 

Assistance to citizens 

to other departments 

stranded people 

lockouts 

escorts 
Automo biles 

reported stolen 

stolen vehicles recovered 

citations 
Breaking and Entering 

attempted 
Burglar alarms answered 
Bomb Scares 

Civil matters and family problems 
Closed homes checked 
Court Attendance 
Disturbances 
Emergency calls 
Fires responded by Police 
Doors found unlocked or open 
Window found unlocked or open 
Personal held in protective custody 
Funeral Escorts 

Investigations of Miscellaneous complaints 
La rceny 

under $100.00 

over $100.00 

bicycles 

motor vehicles 

shoplifting 
Attempted larceny 
Lost children reported 
Lost children found by Police 
Malicious destruction of Property 
Mischievous acts 



257 


15 


4 


1 


43 


5 


338 


68 


3 


288 


333 


58 


251 


13 


8 


9 


1036 


24 


5 


814 





46 


50 


1 10 


9 


94 


149 


217 


13 


31 


37 


1297 


95 


76 


10 


8 


5 


16 


2 


3 


207 


84 



42 



Missing persons from State Hospital 
Missing patients located by Police 
Missing persons reported 
Missing persons located 
Messages delivered 
Permits issued 

gunsmith/firearms dealers 

ammunition 

firearm ID cards 

pistol permits 

bicycle registrations 
Stolen bicycle recovered 
Power failure 

Sudden deaths investigated 
Summons served 
Suspicious vehicles 
Suspicious persons 
Suspicious or annoying calls 
Injured adults 
Assaults 
Wires down 
False alarms 
Accostings 
Indecent exposure 



39 
7 

19 
4 

20 

4 

3 

62 

121 

55 

1 

24 

14 

14 

153 

109 

69 

7 

10 

16 

2 

1 

2 



43 



AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Hedfield: 

We had a few less trips this year than in 1987. This 
year, we had 338 trips. As has been our desire, we had a few 
new EMT volunteers join us during 1988. A couple also left our 
services, but a total of 21 people made significant contribu- 
tions. Under our bylaw passed in 1977, we paid 18 EMTs a total 
of $6,900.00 for 1988, which is an increase of 4 EMT's and 
$1 ,700.00 over last year. 

The new ambulance received in December 1987, has been 
giving us good service throughout the year. John Wilhelmi has 
helped by seeing that the ambulance is stocked, cleaned and 
maintained . 

Glen Jackson resigned as an EMT at the end of the year. 
Many thanks to Glen for volunteering his time for the past 10 
years . 

We responded to mutual aid 6 times, 4 times to Millis and 
2 times to Dover. We received mutual aid from Millis 4 times 
and Dover once. 

Destination of the trips as follows: 

Leonard Morse 141 

Norwood 53 

Glover Memorial 40 

Framingham Union 35 

Newton-Wellesley 11 

Southwood 8 

Miscellaneous 14 

Cancelled or refused 36 



Respectfully submitted, 

William H. Mann 
POLICE CHIEF 



44 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my report as Animal Control Officer for 
the year ending December 31 » 1988. 

Compliance with the leash law has been better in 1988. 
Fewer dogs have been injured or killed in the road. Fewer dog 
complaints recorded. Though Medfield is far from perfect, we 
do see improvement. 

Medfield residents who have made donations for our strays 
have our thanks. Our unending gratitude to Chief Mann and the 
Medfield Police, without whose assistance and support we could 
not function. The Highway Department has our thanks for as- 
sistance given throughout the year. To my assistant Jennifer 
Shaw-Verrochi , thanks for being there. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louise Papadoyiannis 

Animal Control Office 



Multi dog or kennel license 17 

Individual dogs licensed 954 

Dogs killed by cars 6 

Cats killed by cars 8 

Bites or scratches reported 7 

Citations 120 

S t rays adopted 9 

Animal related calls 1059 



45 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my report for the year ending December 
31st, 1 988 

All barns and livestock have been inspected and pass the 
requirements of the Town of Medfield and The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts . 

There are 56 horses, 3 ponies, 1 donkey, 33 sheep, 10 beef 
cattle and assorted poultry, waterfowl and rabbits. 

Medfield had only 8 dog bites during 1988 requiring 
quarantine. One hampster bite was reported. The animal was 
observed for 10 days although hampsters are not rabies 
indicated. All animals were declared free of contagious 
disease. 

I was joined by an observer while making my inspections 
this year. I felt a great deal of pride due to the care and 
love that the livestock owners of Medfield give to their 
animals. In each case, the animals and barns are in the best 
of conditions . 

I thank the people of Medfield and their animals for 
making my job so enjoyable. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Karen Mac Gregor, 
Animal Inspector 



46 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report as Civil Defense Director 
for the year ending December 31, 1988. 

The Civil Defense Director's responsibilities are to act 
as a liaison between the Selectmen and the Town Departments in 
the event of a state declared emergency. The Civil Defense 
Director is also in charge of the Auxiliary Police under the 
supervision of the Chief of Police. 

In addition to our compulsory drills on July 4th and 
Halloween, our Auxiliary Police and Radio Operators were again 
requested to assist in the following events: 

Memorial Day 

June 1988 Road Race 

Medway 275th Anniversary Parade 

Medfield Day 

Christmas Parade 

Fortunately, as a result of a mild winter and inactive 
hurricane season, the department was not called upon to provide 
emergency assistance during 1988. Emergency vehicles and 
equipment have been maintained and are ready for use when 
needed . 

I wish to remind the people of Medfield that it may be 
possible to arrange for showers at one of the schools during 
erne rgencies . 

I would like to thank the men and women of the Auxiliary 
Police for their cooperation throughout the year. Also, I wish 
to thank the Board of Selectmen, Michael Sullivan and his 
staff, and Police Chief Mann. A special thanks to Fire Chief 
Ryan for allowing us the use of his quarters for our EDC room 
and to Ken Feeney and the Highway Department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Vincent Cellucci, 
Civil Defense Director 



47 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit ray eighteenth and final report as Fire 
Chief as I am retiring at the end of July. 

As usual all schools, nursing home, and state hospital 
were inspected and fire drills throughout the year. 

All new commercial buildings as well as church additions 
are being sprinklered in accordance with Massachusetts General 
Law, Chapter 148 section 26G. 

All firefighters received training in the various phases 

of firefighting throughout the year in monthly drills held at 

the station as well as being recertified in First Aid and 

cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. Firefighter Stephen Bassett 
taught these courses. 

In February, Firefighters Scott Bassett, Neal O'Connor and 
David O'Toole attended a Cold Water Rescue Course. In April, 
firefighters Neal O'Connor and David O'Toole attended an 
Elevator Emergencies Course. In September, firefighter David 
O'Toole attended a Vehicle Extrication Course. In October, 
Lieutenant William Kingsbury, firefighters David O'Toole and 
Thomas Seeley attended a Haz-Mat "Training Course. In 
November, Lieutenant William Kingsbury attended a Haz-Mat 
"Train the Trainer" Course. All of the above mentioned courses 
were sponsored by the Massachusetts Firefighting Academy. 

We would like to remind the residents about using smoke 
detectors in their homes. If you have smoke detectors that are 
battery operated, the batteries should be changed yearly. 

On December 31, 1988, Deputy Fire Chief Ellis N. Allen 
retired from the department after serving the residents of 
Medfield faithfully for thirty-seven years. He will be sorely 
missed by us all. 

This was a good year with respect to fires. We did not 
suffer any big loss of property. We hope that this is due to 
the people making sure that their electrical systems were 
working properly and they were maintaining their woodstoves and 
fireplaces . 



48 



In closing, I would like to take this opportunity to thank 
the Police Department, the Building, Gas, and Electrical 
Inspectors, Town Hall Staff, and last but never least the 
members of the fire department and Frederick A. Rogers, Jr., the 
Fire Dispatcher, who have given their dedication and support to 
me for the last eighteen years. I could not have done the job 
without their support. 

Respectfully submitted 

Joseph E. Ryan 
FIRE CHIEF 




Firefighters Clark, Rogers and Kingsbury cooking at their Annual 
Chicken Barbecue. 



49 



SERVICES RENDERED FOR THEYEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1988 



Build ings 

Brush & Grass 

Automo biles 

Rubbish 

Gasoline Washrooms 

Highway Accidents 

Elect rical 

Investigations 

Oil or Gas Burners 

Mutual Aid 

Outside Assistance 

Accidental Alarms 

Chimneys 

Searches 

Outdoor Cooking Permits 

Duplicating Fluid Permits 

Oil Storage Permits 

Blasting Permits 

Home Fire Alarm Inspections 

Woodburning Stove Inspections 

Bonfire Permits 

Tra ins 

Public Assistance 

Lock Outs 

Water Problems 

Bomb Scares 

Pumping Cellars 

Box Alarms 

Still Alarms 

False Alarms 

Station Duty 

Landfill 

Televisions 

Rescues 

Ovens 

Deta ils 

Fence 

Outdoor Burning Permits 

Inspections 

Propane Gas Permits 

Black Powder Permits 

Smokeless Powder Permits 

Fire Marshal Reports 

Derailments 

Smoke Detector Inspections 



8 

72 

6 

3 



7 

16 

83 

5 

10 

3 

83 





3 

4 

38 

18 

19 

10 

1 


1 

3 
7 
1 



152 

165 

4 









4 

4 



916 

87 

4 

2 

5 

9 



130 



50 



WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Water and Sewerage Board, through Town Meeting action, 
has revived the expansion of the waste water collection system. 
The town has seen fit to approve the extension of the Harding 
Street Interceptor, known as Project Number 6 and the 
associated street sewer system connected to it, Pine Needle 
Park Street Sewer Project Number 7. In association with 
Planning Board action at Town Meeting, the board also supported 
the formulation of an aquifer protection district, providing a 
vehicle whereby the land areas having more direct impact on the 
watershed can be regulated in such a way as to minimize the 
risk of water contamination via leachates, spills and/or 
dumping (intentional or unintentional) of hazardous wastes and 
other possible contaminants. Town Meeting, in addition, 
provided for the acquisition of land near our wells No. 3 ♦ #4 
and #5, providing for a minimization of contamination risk. 

At this writing, Project 6 has been put out for bid and is 
on schedule. In the interim, we have been confronted with a 
slowdown in state funding that appears to have an influence on 
the timetable for releasing Project 7 state funding. The 
overall impact is not clear at the present time. 

At our Wastewater Treatment Plant we are moving forward 
with improvements in the plant operation, also authorized at 
Town Meeting. Our objective is a long-term solution to the 
disposition of the sludge generated by the plant. At the 
present time, we are permitted by DEQE to deposit bulked up 
sludge at our landfill. Of course, this is a short term 
solution. Our efforts have been directed toward obtaining a 
classification by DEQE that would allow land application and/or 
sale to others that would be unrestricted and non-hazardous. 
Converting the sludge to compost aids in that effort, making 
the product more saleable. 

An emerging problem is the continued statewide closure of 
landfills and other locations where septage has heretofore been 
dumped. The result is an increased need for surveillance and 
regulation of the septage now coming into the plant. Our 
contract with Dover has been reduced from 40,000 gallons per 
month to 30,000 gallons per month at the considerable 
displeasure of the Town of Dover. Absent concrete progress in 
the solution of the problem of Dover's disposition of sludge 
generated by Dover septage, the town will carry through with 
the notice of termination of the Dover septage contract, which 
was given in the fall of 1988 and takes final effect twelve 
months later, in the fall of 1989. 

We have moved forward with the planning and authorization 
of a full scale test of the well site number 6 just north of 
the Charles River crossing of Route 2^ on property of the 



51 



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We must, sadly, note the passing of our longtime member 
and associate, Jack Williams to whom the town owes a 
considerable debt of gratitude for the energy and foresight he 
provided to this department. His counsel and support is surely 
missed by all. 

We have experienced a change in our secretarial position. 
Gail Fernandes, employed to replace Gert Simpson, has left our 
employ as of July 1 , 1988. She has been replaced by Evelyn 
Clarke, our present secretary. We welcome her and wish Gail 
well in her departure from the Water and Sewerage Department. 

Lastly, we wish to record here that the Massachusetts 



52 



Water Resources Authority (MWRA), in its wisdom, abandoned the 
proposed siting of a landfill/incinerator in the vicinity of 
the Route 109/Walpole town line which was in the Mine Brook 
aquifer. The MWRA has, however, selected a site for a landfill 
near the Walpole State Prison at Cedar Junction, located within 
the watershed of the Stop River. The Stop River empties into 
the Charles River just upstream of our wells #1 and #2 at Route 
109 and Charles River. We do have some concern, but of the two 
choices the one MWRA has made appears to impact on our town the 
least. Time will tell. 

The Board looks forward to another active year, including 
the previously mentioned projects, and solicits your support in 
the "common sense approach" to water use we should all follow 
during the summer period. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Leland D. Beverage, Chairman 
Peyton March 
Geoffrev M. Sauter 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



FISCAL 
1988 



Total Services 
Added Services 
Thousand Gallons used 
Thousand Gallons sold 



3,100 

70 

348,825 

302,808 



WATER REVENUE RECEIVED 



Water Rates 
Water Services 



$325,080 
$ 4,517 



Expenses 
Debt Service 



$252,390 
$127,550 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 



Total Units 

Added Units 

Sewer Use Charge 

State Hospital Sewer Use 



990 

60 

$186,631 

$ 91 ,184 



Sewer Install Fees 

Septic Waste Disposal Fee 



$ 3,577 
$ 26,760 



Expenses 
Debt Services 



$261 ,556 
$219,956 



53 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

January 1, 1988 was the assessment date for valuation of 
Town property and the 1989 reevaluation program. The 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts mandates that every town revalue 
property every three years to bring it to f ull-and-f air cash 
value. Medfield began its fourth in-house reevaluation 
covering the last three years. From 1985 to 1988 land values 
soared and the real estate market peaked and then at the end of 
1987, the market became very "soft." These conditions made it 
very difficult for a reevaluation 

Staffing was an issue at the beginning of 1988 for the 
Assessors and the Board of Health/Building Departments, who 
were sharing one person as assistant in their departments. 
Several meetings were held with the Board of Health/Building, 
Assessors and Town Administrator to deal with this problem. It 
was resolved when the Board of Health/Building Department was 
assigned a permanent part-time person and the Board of 
Assessors retained a full-time senior secretary. This was 
especially important to the Assessors in a reevaluation year. 

In March, after the reelection of William D. Walsh to the 
Board, the Board reorganized with Carol A. Rossi, chairman; 
Susan N. Thornton, clerk and William D. Walsh, third member. 

In the spring, Stan Bergeron, Medfield's appraiser for the 
past 12 years, presented the Board with the new commercial and 
industrial values. In the meantime, as a result of Town 
Meeting Susan N. Thornton was appointed to the newly formed 
Financial Management Study Committee. There was also a change 
in personnel in the assessing office. Debra Greene resigned 
and Irene M. Hartling was hired as full-time senior secretary. 
She has been a valuable addition to the staff. 

In July, the preliminary values for all property in town 
were ready to be sent to the Department of Revenue with a 
request for a review for certification. At this point the 
reevaluation program was proceeding along in a timely manner. 
The Department of Revenue reviewed the values and used Medfield 
as a pilot project for the rest of the state in order to test a 
more expeditious formula for certification. Medfield's values 
were given approval by the Department of Revenue and impact 
notices were sent to all taxpayers advising them of their new 
values. Preliminary hearings were held with the public, 
staffed by the Assessors and Stan Bergeron. The Selectmen held 
a classification hearing and then approved one tax rate for all 
classes of property. The tax rate was approved at $10.20 and 



54 



the tax bills were sent out on October 21, 1988. 

It is a credit to Stan Bergeron that in a very shaky 
market there were only 35 o verevaluat ion applications. There 
were over 3800 bills sent and the applications for 
ove revaluation represent .9% of those bills. State-wide it is 
considered excellent if, in a reevaluation year, there is a 10$ 
filing of overvaluation applications. Again, Stan Bergeron 
has completed a reevaluation with a maximum of efficiency, 
minimum of problems and at a minimum cost to the Town. 

We thank our able staff: Marjorie Temple, Irene Hartling 
and Stanley Bergeron, for their outstanding work over the year 
and for all the extra effort they put into our very successful 
reevaluation program at a relatively low cost to the Town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Carol A. Rossi, Chairman 
William D. Walsh, Clerk 
Susan N. Thornton 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 




U.S. Rep. Barney Frank and State Rep. Harkins meeting with voters 



55 



PLANNING BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

1988 was another year of growth and change for Medfield, 
marked by both a continuing increase in the pace of 
development, and strong new initiatives by the Town to protect 
its aquifer and open lands and to provide affordable housing. 
The 1988 Town Meeting adopted an Aquifer Protection District 
Bylaw and overrode Proposition 2-1/2 in order to acquire 
Kingsbury Pond and land adjacent to wells No. 4 and No. 5« The 
Town also voted to transfer control of a parcel of Town-owned 
land off Dale Street to the Selectmen for the purpose of 
developing affordable housing under the State's Homeownership 
Opportunity Program. 

The Planning Board continues to face the challenge of 
reviewing and regulating the development of often-problematic 
sites, attempting to resolve difficult issues of drainage, 
access and disruption of the natural terrain. The Board is 
trying to promote more coordination of information with other 
Town boards to allow "the left hand to know what the right hand 
is doing." 

While the Board was occupied with its routine - but very 
time consuming - reviews of specific subdivision and site 
plans, it also provided support to the Open Space Planning 
Committee, which was working hard to bring up to date the 
Town's long-range plan for Open Space and Recreation. In June 
the committee completed its 18-month study and recommended a 
five-year "Action Plan." The Planning Board is committed to 
the implementation of this plan for preservation and use of the 
Town's open land, and hopes for enthusiastic Town participation 
in carrying out its objectives. 

Another product of the Open Space Study was a new Storm 
Drainage Plan which evaluated the condition of all major 
culvert systems in the Town, and provided a basis from which 
the Town can require developers to enlarge or improve culverts 
in conjunction with new development. 

The Board continues to support efforts toward achieving a 
balanced range of housing types in Medfield, through the 
appointment of one of its members to the Affordable Housing 
Committee . 

In addition to the task of reviewing and approving plans, 
the Board proposed several zoning changes to the Town Meeting, 
listed below, all of which were adopted. 



56 



TOWN MEETING ACTIONS: 



Prote 
suppl 
amend 
to be 
the P 
renam 
chang 
condo 
f or m 
res ta 
regul 
rezon 



The 
ctio 
y . 

ment 
dry 
lann 
ing 
e th 
mini 
ulti 
uran 
at io 
ing 



19 
n D 
Othe 

(D 
; (2 
ing 
"Clu 
e mi 
urns ; 
f ami 
ta ; 
ns 
art i 



88 Ann 
ist ric t 
r chang 
requir 
) restr 
Board m 
ster Re 
sconcep 
(5) c 
ly unit 

and 
tempo ra 
cles su 



ual 

By 
es t 
ing 
ict i 
ore 
side 
tion 
lari 
s; 
(7) 
ry s 
bmit 



Tow 
law 
o th 
a ce 
ng e 
lati 
ntia 

tha 
fvin 
(6) 

cla 
igns 
ted 



n Me 
to he 
e Byl 
rtain 
a rth 
tude 
1" t 
t Clu 
g the 
clari 
rif y i 
. * T 
by pe 



eting app 
lp protec 
aw were vo 

percentag 
removal in 
when revie 
o "Open Sp 
ster Resid 

wording o 
fying park 
ng sign 
he Board d 
tition in 



roved 
t Med 
ted as 
e of a 
town ; 
wing s 
ace Re 
ent ial 
f are 
ing f o 
bylaw 
id not 
1988. 



an 

field 

foil 

buil 

(3) 

ite p 

siden 

Zoni 

a re 

r "fa 

and 

sup 



Aquifer 
' s water 
ows: An 
dable lot 
allowing 
lans ; ( 4 ) 
t i a 1 " to 
ng means 
qui rement 
st food" 
f urthe r 
port two 



RESIDENTIAL SUBDIVISIONS AND SITE PLANS: 



During 1988 the Planning Board approved the following 
preliminary subdivision plans: 1) Tannery Farm off Route 109W; 
2) The Meadows off Route 109E; 3) Nye off Route 109; 4) 
Overfield Estates off and including Pine Street; 5) Southern 
Acres off South Street and 6) Cranberry Park off Wood End Lane. 

The following definitive subdivision plans were approved: 

1) Wampatuck off Route 109E (47 lots) 

2) Acorn Circle off Hickory Drive( 7 lots) 

3) Lakewood II off Lakewood Drive( 4 lots) 

4) Tallwoods off Granite Street ( 5 lots) 

5) Shepherd Lane Modification ( 1 lot) 

6) Lawrence Circle Extension ( 1 lot) 

7) Tannery Farm off Route 109W (15 lots) 

The Planning Board denied the Equestrian Estates 
Subdivision Plan because no convincing evidence was provided by 
the developer that the runoff from this subdivision would not 
pollute Medfield's wells. 

In 1987 five subdivisions containing 41 lots were 
approved. In comparison, in 1988 seven subdivisions containing 
87 lots were approved. 

The following site plans were reviewed and approved: 

Residential Condominiums: 

1) Oliver Clifford House ( 4 units) 

2) Prentiss Place (24 units) 

3) Medfield Crossing (16 units) 



57 



Industrial and Commercial Site Plana; 

1) Office Condominiums - Brook Street 

2) Leuders - Brook Street 

3) Mobile Excavating - West Mill Street 

4) Yered & Keleher - West Mill Street 

5) Basile - Marvin Drive 

Parking plans were approved for Gary Miner, North Street, 
and Walter Reynolds, Brook Street. The Board has requested a 
parking plan for Park Street Station. 

Twenty-seven plans under the category of Subdivision 
Control Not Required were reviewed by the Board. Twenty-five 
were approved and two were denied. 

Lots were released for building as follows: four on 

Deerfield Drive, five on Country Meadow Estates, one on 

Shepherd Lane and two on Stuart Street, totalling eleven for 
the year, 

SIGN ADVISORY BOARD : 

The Sign Advisory Board has provided guidance and 
recommendations for approval of sign applications filed with 
the Zoning Enforcing Officer during the past year. They have 
also provided assistance to applicants in preparing the sign 
applications and in the interpretation and compliance with the 
Sign Bylaw. 

The Board has brought any observed violations of the Sign 
Bylaw to the attention of the Zoning Enforcing Officer, and 
they have continued efforts to maintain the intent of the 
Bylaw in the community. The last Town Meeting passed several 
revisions of the Zoning Bylaw which were prepared by the 
Committee and necessary to clarify the intent of the various 
Zoning Bylaw sections. 

OTHER BUSINESS : 

Board members have served on the Open Space Planning 
Committee, the Drainage Study Committee, Affordable Housing 
Committee, Capital Budget Committee, Aquifer Bylaw Committee, 
Medfield State Hospital Advisory Committee and the Committee to 
Study Blasting. Board members also serve as liaisons to other 
Town boards. 

The Board has continued to use the engineering services of 
Whitman & Howard for subdivision and site plan reviews and 
inspections . 



58 



The Planning Board acknowledges with thanks the 
cooperation and assistance of other Town Boards and Departments 
during the year, with special thanks to Town Counsel Charles 
Fuller, Zoning Enforcing Officer John O'Toole, Superintendent 
of Streets Kenneth Feeney and Highway Foreman Robert Kennedy, 
for their cooperation. 

The Board also would like to single out for special 
recognition their administrator, Mildred Willis, who marked 
twenty years of service to the Town this year. Without her 
near-total recall of past Planning and Appeals business, her 
professional presence at all Board meetings, and her 
unquenchable good humor, even in adversity, we all would be 
lost ! 

Planning Board meetings are held weekly on Mondays at 7:45 
p.m. at the Town House and are open to the public. 
Appointments with the Board must be made by the Thursday noon 
prior to the meeting. Requests for information or appointments 
should be directed to the Planning Administrator, Mildred E. 
Willis, at the Town House. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John K. Gagliani, Chairman 
Joseph D. Codispoti, Vice Chairman 
E. Lawrie Rhoads, Secretary 
Joseph R. Parker, Jr. 
Margaret E. Bancroft 

MEDFIELD PLANNING BOARD 




View across Baker's Pond — Medfield Day 



59 



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.' / vi- 





Moving day for the United Church of Christ Parsonage from Main Street 
to Brook Street. 

62 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Board of Appeals acted on the following applications 
during 1988: 

GRANTED: Special permit for doctor's office. 

Two special permits to work in flood plain. 

Five special permits to work within watershed 

protection district. 

Three special permits for construction trailers. 

Withdrawal of application for special permit. 

Special permit for open space residential 

development . 

Renewal of special permit. 

Special permit for nonconforming lotlines. 

Special permit for pumping station. 

Four variances to remove loam. 

Rehearing for loam removal. 

Variance for setback of house already constructed. 

Variance for plantings within buffer between single- 

and multi-family lot. 

Variance from buffer requirements in business zone. 

Extension of variance for height. 

Variance for lot with no frontage on public way. 

Variance for rear lot setback for swimming pool. 

DENIED: Variance for house with insufficient frontage. 
Permission to rehear application. 
Variance for frontage. 
Special permit for day care center. 

The Board would like to thank Bernard Monbouquette for the 
time and energy he has spent working with the Board and wish 
him well in his move to Nebraska. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert F. Sylvia, Chairman 
Burgess P. Standley, Secretary 
Ralph C. Good, Jr., Member 
Sandra G. Munsey, Associate 
Charles H. Peck, Associate 



63 



ACQUIFER BYLAW COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Aquifer Bylaw Committee hereby submits its annual report 
for the year ending December 31 f 1988. 

Appointed by the Selectmen in January, the committee met 
frequently for three months in order to draft a bylaw for 
additional protection of Medfield's primary aquifers, which 
serve as the sole source of drinking water for 97$ of the 
town's households. Immediately prior to formation of the 
Committee, the Water and Sewer Commission's engineers had 
provided the town for the first time with a map delineating the 
approximate boundaries of the aquifers, an indispensable first 
step in establishing a new regulatory district. 

The Committee's work culminated in the nearly unanimous 
adoption by the Annual Town Meeting of an Aquifer Protection 
District bylaw, added as Section 16 of the Medfield Zoning 
Bylaw and as an "overlay" on the zoning map. Subsequently the 
new bylaw was approved, as is required, by the Attorney General 
of the Commonwealth. The bylaw defines two types of aquifer 
zone — one in the immediate area of public wells, and one 
comprising the balance of land in the primary aquif ers--and 
attempts to regulate waste disposal and certain land uses in 
those areas to the extent permissible under state law. 

The concerted effort and enthusiasm of this committee in 
carrying out a complex assignment in a short time was one more 
example of the "pitch in and solve it" spirit of civic 
involvement which is a Medfield trademark, and which makes it a 
pleasure to live in - and to serve - thi3 town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Margaret E. Bancroft, Chairman 
John H. Beale 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
Charles F. Fuller, Jr. 
Peyton March 
Neil~D. MacKenzie 
Bernard Monbouquette 
Michael J. Sullivan 



64 



CABLE T.V. COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

SUMMARY 

The highlights of the past year were: 

1. Completion of the Public Access Studio assembly and wiring 
of the Control Room. 

2. The naming of Robert Gibbs, our Vice-Chai rman , as the 
"Medfield Man of the Year" in recognition of his efforts 
during the design and wiring of the Public Access Studio 
in addition to his counsel during the contract negotiation 
phase of several years ago. 

SUBSCRIBER NETWORK 

Cablevision continues to provide an excellent quality 
signal and responsive service to town subscribers. We did 
however, experience our first two price increases (Feb. 1 and 
Oct. 1) since the inception of the contract in 1986. This was 
permitted by the contract which required that the prices remain 
frozen for two years. 

One situation presented itself which the town must be 
vigilant on in the future ( Building Permit Dept. please take 
note ) . A resident on Deerfield Drive requested installation of 
cable service almost 2 years ago and still has not received it 
because the developer will not give Cablevision authorization 
to install the required underground system. I understand that 
this development began before the town had the requirement that- 
all developers must now provide for cable TV as well as the 
other utilities. 

PUBLIC ACCESS NETWORK (CABLE 8) 

Installation of equipment to televise the Selectmen's 
Meeting was accomplished and further improvements are planned 
to give front views of participants from the audience. The 
presentation are becoming quite popular. 

All cables on the roof of the Jr. High School have now 
been put underground, eliminating the concern for damage due to 
snow or ice. 

An underground cable was also run from the studio to the 
athletic field which could be used for live telecasts. 

INSTITUTIONAL NETWORK 

An extensive wiring task has been initiated to wire the 
school system into the institutional network. Bob Gibbs is 



65 



supervising. Material is being provided by funds from the 
public access committee. 

MEDFIELD LOCAL CHANNELS 2.4.5.6 

Use of these channels improved dramatically during the 
past year, when Cablevision discovered that some batteries had 
been overlooked during system installation and this resulted in 
loss of memory after any power outage, necessitating retyping 
of all data. Unexplained outages are still occurring at a 
higher than desired rate but Ca blevision ' s response to these 
outages has been exceptional. 

OTHER 

Meetings are now being scheduled every 2 months (usually 
the 1st Wednesday) unless an urgent issue arises. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William F. Kean, Chairman 

CABLE TV COMMITTEE 




Robert Gibbs and Bay Bancroft receive the Lions' Club "Citizen of the 
Year" Award. 



66 



COMMUNITY CABLE 
ACCESS CORPORATION 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I. INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE 

The Medfield Community Cable Access Corporation is a 
private, nonprofit corporation made up of the residential 
subscribers to the Medfield cable television system. The 
system is owned and operated by Massachusetts Cablevision 
Systems, L.P. ("Cablevision"), under a municipal franchise 
awarded by the Town of Medfield in accordance with federal and 
state law. The Board of Directors is elected by subscribers at 
an Annual Meeting in March of each year. At the present time, 
the Directors are concurrently appointed by the Board of 
Selectmen to serve as a town committee. The Board functions 
simultaneously in both capacities. 

It is the purpose of the Medfield Community Cable Access 
Corporation to provide to the residents of Medfield the 
opportunity to participate in the local origination of cable 
television programming of community interest, utilizing the 
studio and portable facilities provided to the Town by 
Cablevision. 

II. ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY 

In October, 1985, the Board of Selectmen appointed a Cable 
TV Committee to monitor construction and equipping of the 
public access studio facilities by Cablevision and to establish 
an independent corporation to administer the access channel. 
After evaluating how other communities in Massachusetts 
regulate and administer community cable television, the 
committee recommended and the Selectmen approved increasing the 
committee to 8 members and dividing into two separate 
organizations: a 3 member committee to handle license and 
regulatory matters and a 5 member committee to administer the 
access channel. The division occurred in April, 1987, when the 
access channel became operational, and in August, 1987, the 
access committee organized the Medfield Community Cable Access 
Corporation as a nonprofit corporation under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

At the request of the Town Counsel, an inquiry was made to 
the Department of Revenue regarding the legality of funding an 
independent corporation through a municipal contract. The DOR 
has yet to respond formally to this inquiry. The Town has not 
released the access funds to the corporation, pending an 
affirmative response. The Massachusetts CATV Commission has, 
however, supported the legality of such funding, which is 
common throughout the Commonwealth. While thp Board of 
Directors continues to sprve simultaneously as a Town committee 
and to requisition funds through the Town warrant, the Board is 
strongly committed to the concept that community access 



67 



programming should not be regulated by the town government and 
that the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and the terms 
of the cable license mandate that the funds should be turned 
over to the corporation at the earliest opportunity. 

III. CURRENT YEAR'S ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Calendar year 1988 witnessed significant accomplishment in 
the growth of community cable access television in Medfield: 

A. We saw the completion of the Institutional Network and 
its first operation use to televise a community event. 

B. We saw a major modification to the studio control room 
completed by Robert Gibbs. The result is a far more efficient 
and versatile production facility. 

C. We accomplished our first live cablecast, a Big Blue 
basketball game on February 5. 1988. 

D. We granted $500 to the Medfield Coalition for Public 
Education which resulted in two cable programs being produced 
in the schools . 



E. We accomplished our first live telecast of Medfield 



Dav. 



F. We witnessed the initiation of new programming, 
including "Rock Talk" and "One Man's Opinion on Sports". 
Francesca Stirling's "All Around Town" received funding from 
CIBA Corning and was accepted for regional cablecasting on 
Channel 11, over all the Cablevision region. 

G. We achieved tax exempt status with the IRS and 
Massachusetts DOR. We retained the services of Robert Dennehy, 
CPA, as accountant for the corporation. 

H. We were pleased to see Robert Gibbs receive the 
Medfield Lions Club's annual "Citizen of the Year" award, in 
recognition of his many important contributions to the 
establishment of community cable television in Medfield. 
Congratulations, Bob! 

IV. GOALS FOR THE COMING YEAR 

Our goals for 1989 are as follows: 

A. To establish the independence of Medfield Community 
Cable Access Corporation from the Town of Medfield and to 
achieve a transfer of all access funds and funding from the 
Town to the corporation. 

B. To support the development of better training 
workshops and to more effectively bring active volunteers into 
community cable access programming. 

C. To hire a part-time secretary to support the 
dav-to-dav activities of Cable 8. 



68 



D. To support existing programming on Cable 8. 

E. To support the development of new programs on Cable 8. 

F. To support the use of Cable 8 in and through the 
public schools. 

G. To support community and civic activities in Medfield, 
whenever possible, by cablecasting them on Cable 8. 

V. NOMINATIONS AND ELECTIONS 

The Board of Directors of Medfield Community Cable Access 
Corporation is made up of the following individuals, whose 
terms run until the dates set forth below: 



Libby Allison (Treasurer) 
William Pope 

Robert Sawyer (President) 
Francesca Stirling (Clerk) 



July 1 , 1989 

July 1 , 1989 

July 1 , 1990 

July 1 , 1991 



Due to the resignation of Nancy Temple in December, 
a fifth position on the Board is vacant. 



1988, 



The Board of Directors would like to recognize and express 
its gratitude to the following persons for their outstanding 
contributions to community television in Medfield: 

Nancy Temple - whose sound judgement, pleasant nature, 
good humor, efficiency and beautifully written minutes will be 
sorely missed by the rest of the Board. Best of luck on the 
Warrant Committee and thank you for your contributions (both on 
the Board and the screen). 

Jay Fadden - whose continued skill, energy and commitment 
to Cable 8 Medfield are both an inspiration and integral 
element of the continued growth and development of the 
community cable program in Medfield. 



Robert 



Gibbs 



whose manv 



cont ri but ions 



to 



the 



establishment of first rate community cable television in 
Medfield will mean that residents for many years to come will 
have the opportunity to have a greater awareness and 
appreciation of the finer qualities of our town, its 
government, schools and citizens. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert K. Sawyer, Jr. 
President 

COMMUNITY CABLE ACCESS COMMITTEE 



69 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

There have been many changes for the Council on Aging 
during the past year. 

On July 5, 1988, Barbara Connors became our new Director, 
replacing Harry Mitchell, a very popular Director for 
approximately 6 years. 

On August 1 , 1988, we moved the Council office from the 

Town House to the Hannah Adams Pfaff Building in order that all 

the activities for Medfield's seniors could be held in one 
place . 

The HESSCO's (Health and Social Services Consortium, 
Inc.). nutrition program (hot lunch & meals-on-wheels) moved 
from the First Baptist Church to the Pfaff Center. The Council 
on Aging purchased a new stove and refrigerator for the lunch 
program; in addition, the Council on Aging purchased new 
carpeting and new tables and chairs with money received from a 
state grant . 

To accommodate persons in wheelchairs, the Medfield Prison 
Project provided labor to build a ramp and converted the 
restrooms. In addition, they did a lot of repairs and 
painting. Medfield now has a greatly improved facility for a 
senior's drop-in center. 

There are exercise, painting, crafts and line dancing 
classes for the seniors at the Pfaff Center along with a 
monthly health clinic. You are welcome to come to view the new 
facilities. Our Director's telephone number is 359-3665. 

Another important feature at the Pfaff Center is a private 
office for the Director to meet with seniors, or relatives of 
seniors, to discuss personal matters in privacy. 

Millie Kennedy continues to provide transportation for the 
seniors with Medfield's "Bus for Us." 



70 



We want to thank the many new members of the Friend's of 
Seniors, Inc. (F.O.S.l). F. O.S.I. continues to support 
special projects for the Council on Aging, including the cost 
of mailing about 1,000 H.O.P.E. newsletters monthly. We want 
to also thank the personnel and students at the SNCARC school 
for their important help in sending out the newsletter. 

Once again the Lion's Club provided an outstanding summer 
picnic for the seniors. A combination of the American Legion 
and its Auxiliary, the Sportsman Club, and the Lions put on a 
wonderful Christmas party and dinner for over 200 seniors. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Arthur L. Farrar, Chairman 

Carl J. Brewer, Treasurer 

Ben B. Korbly 

Adeline H. Cochrane 

Patricia Whitney 

Annie M. Rogers 

Barbara J. Connors, Director 




Jan Owen and Raymond Dignard enjoying the Hot Lunch Program 



71 



COUNCIL ON ARTS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The year 1988 was a most active and exciting one for the 
Medfield Council on the Arts. Our major accomplishment for the 
year was the creation of a nonprofit public art gallery in 
Medfield. The new art gallery, named the Zullo Gallery, opened 
on October 1, 1988. The council also operated its first booth 
on Medfield Day which provided information about Arts Lottery 
programs and resources available to Medfield residents. These 
achievements would not have been possible without the 
enthusiastic support of the members of the arts council, local 
businesses and, most importantly, the townspeople of Medfield. 

The Council on Arts distributes funds allocated to the 

Town of Medfield through the State Arts Lottery Fund. This 

program supports the arts and humanities in Massachusetts. The 
awards granted in 1988 are as follows: 

SPRING CYCLE - ARTS LOTTERY 

Medfield Council on Arts. $2,300.00. To establish a 
free, public, nonprofit art gallery. 

Marcel Maurice Sarmiento. $650.00. To prepare, produce 
and create a feature dramatic film. 

Rhododendron Needlers Quilt Guild. $500.00. To sponsor a 
"Quilt Day" at the Pfaff Center, aided by the Vermont 
Quilt Festival team. 

Medfield Council on Arts. $400.00. To operate an 
information booth on Medfield Day. 

C.S.A. of Wheelock Primary School. $400.00. To provide 
two performances by a mime for children and their 
families . 

Deborah Louise Weir. $300.00. To photograph American 
Indian tribes of the southwest. 

Neponset Choral Society. $120.00. To help fund a 
production of Gilbert & Sullivan's "Yeomen of the Guard." 

SPRING CYCLE - PERFORMING ARTS STUDENT SERIES: 

Medfield High School. $145.00. 29 students attended the 
National Theater of Performing Arts to see Moliere's 
L Avare. 



72 




Bill Pope hanging the new Zullo Gallery banner 




Arts Council members preparing exhibit at gallery 



73 



ALL CYCLE - ARTS LOTTERY: 

Medfield Arts Lottery Council. $2,000.00. To sustain art 
gallery. 

Wheelock Primary School. $342.00. To transport 200 
children to the Boston Ballet. 

Yankee ingenuity. $130.00. To produce and perform 
Mamet's "The Duck Variations." 

Neponset Choral Society. $120.00. To help fund a 
production of Handel's "Messiah." 

FALL CYCLE - PERFORMING ARTS STUDENT SERIES; 

Wheelock Primary School. $1,000.00. 200 students 
attended the "Nutcracker" by the Boston Ballet. 

Medfield Middle School. $220.00. 46 students attended La 
Compania Folklorica Latina. 

Medfield Middle School. $155.00. 32 students attended 
Moliere's "Tartuffe." 

A 1987 grant awarded to Bonnie Graves Wilder resulted in 
the publication of "The Music Dreaming Man." This historical 
musical celebrates the life of Dr. Lowell Mason, who was born 
in Medfield, and the 150th anniversary of music in public 
schools. The work premiered November 26, 1988, in Chelmsford. 

The Council on Arts wishes to thank the entire community 
for their help in nurturing the vitality of cultural life in 
Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Martha Moon, Co-Chairman 
Marie Z. Nolan, Co-Chairman 

Treasurer 
Marie A. Hatem, Secretary 
Francis Iafolla, PASS Coordinator 
Amy Imber 
Jeffrey Masters 
William Pope 
Timothy Ryan 
Karen Morgan 
Wendy Clarridge Corkhum 
Patricia Cook 
Laura Howick 



74 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

We respectfully submit the report of the Cemetery 
Department for the year ending 1988. 

The year 1988 brought a new era to the Commission in that 
we hired our first full-time superintendent, Lawrence 
Whitestone. In addition, the department was assisted by 
personnel from the Massachusetts Correctional Institute. They 
contributed approximately 2200 man hours in maintaining the 
grounds. The Commission also implemented a tree planting and 
maintenance program, as many trees are getting quite old and 
are in need of pruning, fertilization, and replacement. The 
year brought 47 internments and the sale of 98 lots. 

We again requested the assistance of the Norfolk County 
engineers to map the entire cemetery and to lay out the final 
section that abuts Bridge Street. 

We wish to thank all the departments in town for their 
support, for without their help our job would have been much 
more difficult. We also wish to thank Nancy Franke, our 
secretary, for all of her help. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Eric W. O'Brien, Chairman 
David F. McCue, Clerk 
Walter Revnolds 



75 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Conservation Commission is appointed by the Selectmen, 
and mandated to review all activity within the jurisdiction of 
Chapter 131 » section 40 of the Massachusetts General Laws and 
the Medfield Wetlands Bylaw. All activity within 100 feet of a 
wetland (actual waterbody or specified vegetation) must be 
reviewed by the Conservation Commission and receive a 
determination of applicability or an order of conditions prior 
to commencement. 

During 1988 the conservation commission reviewed the 
following projects, with decisions noted: 

1. Lasell Realty, Grace Drive - residential dwelling denied. 

2. Lueders, Brook Street - above surface storage tank within 
100' buffer approved with conditions. 

3. Ard Righ Estates - residential lots approved with 
conditions. 

4. Basile Tech Park, West Mill Street - industrial park 
denied, negative order of conditions. 

5. Acorn Estates off Hickory Drive - residential dwellings, 
approved order of conditions - special conditions. 

6. Wampatuck Estates off Rt. 109 - residential subdivision, 
approved order of conditions. 

7. Medfield Water & Sewerage Board - Wastewater Treatment 
Plant improvements, approved order of conditions. 

8. Cebrowski, Philip Street - residential dwelling, order of 
conditions issued. 

9. Lakewood Terrace, off Lakewood Drive - residential 
subdivision, order of conditions issued. 

10. Town of Medfield, Harding Street Sewers - order of 
conditions issued. 

11. Tannery Farm, Main Street - order of conditions issued. 

12. Town of Medfield Test Wells - order of conditions issued. 

13« Shell Oil Co. - Installation of test wells for leakage, 
requested by Hazardous Waste Committee - order of 
conditions issued. 



76 



14. Acorn Circle Lot 3, residential dwelling 
conditions issued. 



order of 



15. Mobil Excavating, West Mill Street - order of conditions 
issued . 

The volume of projects continued to increase in number and 
complexity in 1988. The increased requests for public hearings 
lead to several bimonthly meetings to accommodate the influx. 
Many of the hearings were kept open due to outstanding concerns 
or deficiencies in the plans, wetland delineations or need for 
design modifications to minimize adverse environmental impacts. 
Meetings were held on January 7, February 11 and 18th, March 3, 
April 7, and 21st, May 5, and 19th, June 2, July 7, August 4, 
September 8, October 6, November 3, and December 1, 1988. 

The commission added three new members during 1988. This 
helped ease the workload. With the addition of other 
interested citizens as well as the present commission members, 
the Medfield Conservation Commission anticipates activities in 
more non-regulatory activities such as recreation, citizen 
participation activities and conservation type workshops. 

The Conservation Commission welcomes new members. 
Meetings are held on the first Thursday of each month at 7:30 
and at other times when necessary. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Douglas S. Sparrow, Chairman 

Lee Howell, Secretary 

David Morrish, Treasurer 

Robert Kinsman 

Jesse Matuson 

Craig Harwood 

Caroline Standley 

Stephen Bassett, Associate 

Member 
Betty Kaerwer, Associate Member 
John Beale, Associate Member 
Daniel Fritzsche, Associate 

Member 
Theresa Cos, Associate Member 
Hanson Robbins, Associate 

Member 



77 



FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 
STUDY COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Financial Management Study Committee was formed by the 
Selectmen in June, 1988, following adoption of Article 36 of 
the 1988 Annual Town Meeting. Article 36 proposed an amendment 
to the Town Charter to combine the positions of Treasurer and 
Collector and to determine if said positions 3hall be appointed 
or elected. The Article was amended to establish a committee 
to investigate Medfield financial administration and report to 
the 1989 Town Meeting. 

The objectives of the Committee were to: 

1. Determine the feasibility of combining the offices of 
Treasurer and Tax Collector and recommend whether the 
Treasurer-Collector should be elected or appointed; 

2. Review the current financial management organization of 
the Town to determine any operational needs and make 
appropriate recommendations for improvement. 

The Committee reviewed reports of previous Town committees 
which have examined the structure of financial administration, 
as well as recent consultant and study committee reports in 
other communities. Assistance was received from the 
Massachusetts Municipal Association and the Massachusetts 
Department of Revenue. 

We make the following recommendations for improvements to 
the financial management structure of the Town to assure a high 
level of professionalism in fiscal management and investment of 
Town funds. 

1. Treasurer and Tax Collector should be combined into one 
position, appointed for a three year term, subject to 
performance, by a special committee comprised of one member of 
the Board of Selectmen, one member of the Board of Assessors, 
and a cit izen-a t-large knowledgeable in financial management 
selected by the two elected boards. The Treasurer-Collector 
should be selected on the basis of considerable experience and 
education in municipal financial management. The majority of 
the Committee makes this recommendation; however Mr. Earrett 
dissents from the majority recommendation and supports the 
election of a combined Treasurer/Collector. 

2. The Committee also recommends that the Town establish a 
financial management committee, as described in recommendation 
1 above, to nominate candidates for the position of 



78 



Treasurer/Collector; to serve in an advisory capacity to the 
Treasurer/Collector; and from time to time to make 
recommendations to the Board of Selectmen relative to changes 
in the financial management structure of the Town. 

3. The Committee recommends that the Charter be amended so 
that it will be possible for the new position of 
Treasurer/Collector to take effect on October 1, 1980. This 
will require action at the 1989 Annual Town Meeting. 

4. The function of Town Accountant should be separated from 
that of the Town Administrator, who currently serves in both 
positions. A full-time Town Accountant should be appointed 
annually by the Board of Selectmen. The Town Accountant should 
report to and be supervised by the Town Administrator. The 
Town Administrator could take over Accountant's duties in case 
of an emergency for a period of not more than 6 months. This 
change may be implemented by the Board of Selectmen and 
requires no Town Meeting action excepting to provide for 
additional salary. We recommend providing funds in the FY90 
budget for this position. 

5. The following salaries are suggested: 



Treasurer/Collector: 
Minimum 
Mid-range 
Maximum 



$30,000 
36,000 
42,000 



Accountant : 
Minimum 
Mid- range 
Maximum 



$24,000 
30,000 
36,000 



We wish to thank those individuals who have assisted us in 
our study and especially for the insights provided by Treasurer 
Barrett, Tax Collector, Preston, and Town Administrator, 
Sullivan . 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sandra G. Munsey, Chairman 
Walter M. Frank, Vice Chairman 
Nancy J. Preston, Secretary 
Edward F. Barrett, Jr. 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Susan N. Thornton 
Paul J. Williamson 



79 



HAZARDOUS WASTE COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

A . Underground Storage Tanks 

We are pleased to report that the campaign for 
registration of Underground Storage Tanks has uncovered 
noncommercial storage capacity in the town of more than 330>000 
gallons . Our files indicate that twenty-three tanks are still 
unregistered, but records show their existence and age. Typical 
size of private tanks is 2000 gallons. The smallest underground 
tank we know of is 250 gallons and the largest private 
individual one is 6000 gallons. School and State Hospital tanks 
range from 10,000 to 30,000 gallons. 

This confirms the earlier postulate that threats of 

leakage from private sources are not trivial. Moreover, the 

330,000 gallon noncommercial capacity far exceeds the 
commercial fuel storage capacity in Medfield. 

Commercial gasoline stations have an aggregate capacity of 
slightly in excess of 100,000 gallons now (Maider Texaco tanks 
are removed). Combined storage of all types of fuel tanks in 
the town is about 450,000 gallons. 

Two oil leaks occurred at heavy heating oil tanks during 
the year. One, at Medfield State Hospital, totaled 2000 gallons 
and another at the Wheelock school amounted to about 100 
gallons. Clean Harbors Company handled both cleanups. 

A report in the New York Times (p. E5 , December 4, 1988) 
states that thirteen states consider that underground tanks 
are the most important threat to groundwater supplies, ahead of 
any other hazard including septic tanks and landfills. 

B . Other Hazardous Situations 

| i } Shell Oil Company 

Shell Oil Company has installed two monitoring wells near 
their pipeline, along the wetlands near Bridge Street. These 
will serve to give advance notice of any hydrocarbon plume 
emanating from their transport svstem near town wells #1 and 

#2. 



80 



{ ii } Radon 

The advisability of individual Radon testing by homeowners 
was promoted during the year. To date there has not been much 
feedback about results but so far we have not seen anything in 
excess of 3 pico Curies per; a level considered safe in 
existing (not new) construction by the EPA. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John H. Beale, Chairman 
Deborah A. Dumphy 
Jesse L. Matuson 
Donald R. Senger 
David T. Burkitt 



.^«r~" 




Transfer Station and Glass Recycling Bin 



81 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The calendar year of 1988 again showed continuing growth 
in the workload for the Board of Health agents, staff members 
and our contracting agencies. Our agents and staff found 
themselves spending more time supplying information and on 
consulting services. After much consultation with the Town 
Administrative staff and additional-part time staff person has 
joined the Board office in a shared position with the 
inspection department. 

SANITATION 

As agent for the Board of Health, John Keefe RS , made 145 
inspections of food service establishments and retail food 
stores and gave consultation and advice to 37 requests and 
investigated 6 food related complaints. All establishments are 
inspected at least quarterly. While most establishments 
maintain their operations within the guidelines of the State 
Sanitary Code, it continues to be necessary for our agent to 
monitor some closer than others when noncompliance is a 
recurring problem in order that corrective action may be 
addressed. In addition to food service inspections, Mr. Keefe 
also held 27 consultations in various public health issues with 
school, highway, town administrative, police and fire personnel 
throughout the year. 

Under, the provision of Chapter II of the State Sanitary 
Code covering minimum standards for human habitation, Mr. Keefe 
made 20 inspections of dwelling units during the year which 
resulted from complaints and random inspections of rental 
housing. Where violations of the State Sanitary Code were 
found, the owner or occupant was ordered to take corrective 
action and follow-up inspections were made to insure 
compliance. Mr. Keefe also made 126 miscellaneous inspections 
which included the public bathing beach, semi public pools, 
laundromats, gas stations, shopping centers and the landfill 
and the transfer station. 29 regular inspections of school 
cafeterias and nursery schools were carried out. throughout the 
year. Total inspections and consultations during 1988 were 
363. 

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 

As the town continues to experience growth and the number 
of residences grow, the load on our environment increases. 
Recognizing this, the Board of Health has been active in 
cooperation with other Boards and Committees, stressing the 
need for proper management of the town's natural resources, 
particularly, the protection of our water resources. With this 
as a priority, our agent and consulting professional engineer, 
William R. Domey, has provided engineering assistance to the 



82 



town residents and reviewed plans for future development in 
subdivision review and drainage plans for site plan review 
process . 



The following is a list of the number 
inspections and related permits issued: 



of 



reviews and 



On-site soil tests 83 

New plan reviews 79 

Septic system construction permits 23 

Construction inspections 81 

Repair permits issued 11 

Installers' permits issued 25 

Subdivision plan reviews (preliminary & definitive) 6 

Well permits issued 3 

Septage handler & carters' permits issued 16 

Swimming pool reviews 13 

Review of plans for additions & renovations 49 

Sewerage complaints and investigations were conducted 
throughout the year and several compliance orders were issued. 
Approximately 165 site visits, 45 conferences and numerous 
hearings were held to respond to the 509 requests for Mr. 
Domey's services during the year. 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

Karen MacGregor, the town's Animal Inspector since 1980 
continues her dedicated service. The Board of Health 
gratefully acknowledges her very capable assistance in that 
position. Her report is contained separately in this Town 
Report. The Board reminds residents of the need for a permit 
issued annually for the keeping of any animals other than 
household pets. Residents are also reminded that all animal 
bites including those from household pets must be reported 
immediately to the Animal Inspector or the Board of Health of 
the town in which the bite occurs so that the animal may be 
quarantined or if necessary, arrangements made for laboratory 
examination. 

BOARD OF HEALTH PERMITS ISSUED 



Restaurants, counter bars, cafeteria food service 

and vending machines 
Food stores and markets 
Temporary food service permits 
Catering permits 
Bakeries 
Laund roma ts 
Funeral directors 

Horse, animal, farm and stable permits 
Veterinary clinic 
Refuse and offal carters 
Milk licenses 
Mobile food service 

TOTAL 



16 

14 

6 

1 
1 
1 
1 

19 
1 
2 
2 
J_ 

65 



83 



Total permits issued, including disposal works 
construction permits, installers, repairs and septage handlers 
was 1 30 . 

The total revenue from the issuance of permits and the 
review of plans was $35,984 for the calendar year 1988 compared 
to $9,536 for 1987. 

CONTRACTS WITH HUMAN SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEMS 

The South Norfolk County Association for Retarded 
Citizens, Inc. (SNCARC) has, despite essentially level-funded 
programs, been able creatively to manage limited growth and 
expansion in several areas. 

The Early Intervention Program for babies aged to 3 
years continues to carry a waiting list for services but 
inroads have been made towards decreasing the list and SNCARC 
continues to provide an ever-expanding number of families with 
educational services and occupational, physical and speech 
therapies. Referrals come from local physicians, hospitals and 
community and family members. 

The Day Habilitation Program has expanded this year to 
thirty-nine clients. Through their ongoing training program 
and by assembling mailings for civic organizations, etc. 
Norfolk Community Enterprises is fully embarked on a new food 
preparation program providing healthful food for Norfolk 
Industrial Services. Their janitorial program now encompasses 
such sites as the Needham YMCA. 

Norfolk Industrial Services has increased the number of 
their supported and competitive employment sites to include 
Burger King, Alimed, Fire Control Instruments, and Building 
#19, enabling many of the handicapped men and women whom SNCARC 
serves to become more independent as they enter the competitive 
work force. 

The residential programs are now well integrated into the 
various towns and SNCARC takes pride in the sense of 
participation in the community which has developed as a result 
of the efforts of the well-trained and dedicated staff. 

Family Support is a new program this year and it is 
designed to support the families who have a disabled family 
member in the most appropriate way. Specific programs to aid 
with transportation or with advocacy and other needs will be 
developed during this coming year. 

Respite Care and Social and Recreational Programs offer 
help to individuals and their families in the South Norfolk 
Area. Without the help from local towns SNCARC could not offer 
such an array of services for our neighbors who have a 
handicapped family member. 



84 



SNCARC 1988 SERVICE REPORT 



Program 



Clients Se rved 



Day Habilitation Program 

(serving the most severely handicapped adults) 
Vocational Training Services 

(Norfolk Industrial Services) 
Early Intervention Program 

(infants birth to age 3) 
Family Support/ reha bili tat ive 

Therapies/Clinical Services 
Respite Care Emergency Services 
Social- recreational/Transportation 

Citizen Advocacv Services 

v i 



1 

6 

16 

7 

16 

1 1 



Norfolk Mental Health Association, is a private nonprofit 
corporation governed by a citizen Board of Directors who 
represent each of the 12 towns it serves, including the Town of 
Medf ield . 



The major 
residents are : 



programs of the NMHA available to Medfield 



Cutler Counseling Center has a fully licensed staff of 
social workers, psychologists and psychiatrists bringing a wide 
range of services to children, adolescents and adults of all 
ages. In order to be most responsive to individual needs and 
community concerns, Cutler Center is organized into specialized 
programs offering services in the following areas: 

Intake and Emergency Adult 

Family and Children Senior Care 

Alcohol and Substance Abuse Chronic Care 

Psychiatry 

Psychological Testing, and Community services, such as the 
Parent-Toddler Program, an educational and supportive program 
for children from birth to age 3, and the Gym program, for 
children between the ages of 5 and 15« Other programs and 
groups include the Widowed Lifeline; Assert iveness Training; 
Separation and Divorce; and Families of Substance Abusers. An 
affiliation with the NORCAP Center provides a comprehensive 
approach in the Alcohol and Substance Abuse Program. 

Project Hire, a sheltered vocational rehabilitation 
facility for people with emotional, developmental or physical 
handicapped. Programs include diagnostic evaluations, 
electronic skill training, work adjustment training and 
counseling, sheltered long-term employment, and transitional 
employment and job placement. 

Parent-Aid Program, offering trained and supervised 
volunteer aides who provide one-to-one help to clients in the 
community, families and individuals in crisis, victims of 
domestic violence, parents at risk of abusing and neglecting 
their children. 

Community Education Programs: The staff of Cutler Center 
are available to provide talks, workshops and consultation on a 



85 



wide variety of mental health related topics. These services 
are available to community agencies, civic organizations, 
business and industry, schools and the Court system. In 
addition, community education programs on such topics as stress 
management, assert iveness training and clinical issues are held 
periodically throughout the year. 

During the fiscal year 1988, Cutler Counseling Center 
provided direct services to approximately 172 people from 
Medfield. The Town of Medfield donated $5,000 to the Center to 
help deploy services. In the past year people from Medfield 
were often referred by friends, neighbors, family, clergy, 
school, physicians, or community agencies. The most common 
request for help concerned such problems as depression and 
anxiety . 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

1988 was another year of challenge and change as the 
Walpole Area Visiting Nurse Association responded to its prior 
year's losses, the first in the 79 year history of the agency. 
Several changes were implemented organizationally and 
operationally in an effort to cut costs and improve efficiency. 
Those changes, along with a significant rate change in Medicaid 
reimbursement have been critical to the Visiting Nurse 
Association's recovery. 

New programs started in 1988 included prenatal and 
postpartum exercise programs and a home safety program. The 
Walpole Area Visiting Nurse Association continues to provide 
programs in health promotion to all age groups in addition to 
the traditional home health services. 

Programs offered to the citizens of Medfield include Home 
Health, Ambulatory Care, Health Promotion and Health Education. 

Home Health includes traditional skilled services 
including nursing, home health aide, physical therapy, 
occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, medical social 
work and nutritional consultation. 

Ambulatory Care consists of outpatient services including 
office nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy and 
speech-language pathology. 

Health Promotion covers preventive services including home 
visits, office nursing and clinics and screenings funded by 
Boards of Health in the Towns of Dover, Medfield, Norfolk and 
Walpole . 

Health Education classes for the general community such as 
childbirth education, parenting, aerobics, senior exercise and 
home safety assessments are offered. 

Of these programs, the Town of Medfield funds are 
allocated to the Health Promotion Program. This program is the 
second largest offered by the Visiting Nurse Association in 
terms of clients served and numbers of services; however, due 



86 



to its' low cost, Health Promotion represents only 5% of the 
Visiting Nurse Association's total corporate budget. The four 
major components of the Health Promotion Program are Health 
Maintenance for the Elderly, Maternal-Child Health, 
Communicable Disease and Public Health. 



Health Mai 
health and maxim 
of age . Elderly 
chronic illness 
care in the Horn 
in-home, by a n 
Ambulatory elde 
physical assess 
health clinics h 
Pfaff Center a 
Village . 



ntenance for the Elderly, promotion of good 
um functioning for all residents over 60 years 
residents who are homebound, and have multiple 
es/condi t ions , but do not qualify for skilled 
e Health Program are seen on a periodic basis, 
urse to prevent further breakdown and illness, 
rly residents are seen at the office for 
merit and counseling, or at the senior citizen 
eld on the first Tuesday of every month at the 
nd the third Tuesdav of everv month at Tilden 



Maternal-Child Health, promotion of the health and 
stability of the family during the periods of reproductive 
maturation, pregnancy childbirth, postpartum period and 
child- rea ring years. Services are provided by a maternal-child 
health nurse specialist through home visits. Infant car seats 
are available for rental. 

Communicable Disease, prevention and control of 

communicable disease through casefinding and education, and 

provision of follow-up care consistent with Public Health 

practice. In addition to following up on reportable diseases 
through home visits or telephone consultation, the Visiting 

Nurse Association provides vaccinations and various tests 
during office hours. 

Public Health, promotion of "good health" awareness for 
the prevention of serious illness. Periodic cholesterol, 
hypertension and diabetes screenings are held, in addition to 
regular testing during office visits. In 1988 the Visiting 
Nurse Association conducted cholesterol screening during 
Medfield Day, at the office during Visiting Nurse Association 
Week in May and again in November. The annual flu clinic was 
held in November. 



The Town of Medfield Public Health Statistics for 1988 are 
follows : 



as 



SERVICE 

Home Visits 

Health Maintenance for Elderly 

Maternal-Child Health 
Communicable Disease Follow-up 
Office Visits 
Senior Citizen Health Clinics 

Medfield Day Cholesterol Screening 

Medfield Schoo] Cholesterol Screening 

Flu Clinic 
Mantoux Tests 



VISITS 


PATIENTS 


280 


56 


38 


38 


10 


10 


25 


1 1 1 


352 


104 


82 


82 


97 


97 


1 69 


1 69 


10 


5 



87 



YOUTH OUTREACH 

The Medfield Youth Outreach program, administered by the 
Board of Health, continues to be a program supported by the 
town. The focus of the Outreach position has traditionally 
been and remains crisis intervention, short and some long-term 
counseling, information and referrals, community and client 
liaison, advocacy, and the Peer Counseling/Leadership program. 
The confidential services are offered f ree-of-charge to 
Medfield youth and their families. Mary P. Conant continues in 
her third year as the director of the program. 

Clients are referred to the Outreach office by the 
schools, state agencies, courts, local professionals, self, 
parents, and local organizations. In most cases concerning 
minor children, parents or other family members may become 
involved in consultation. Meeting with teachers, guidance, 
staff and school administrators may also occur. Major issues 
dealt with throughout the calendar year included: 

divorce homelessness 

pregnancy depression 

sexual abuse family crisis 

school related issues suicide 



Sixt 
peri 
skil 
foil 
year 
Educ 
grou 
spon 
Lead 
Fram 
sele 
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Two Pe 
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ipated 
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he Pe 
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e a 
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list 
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uarv. 



The Outreach worker continues to participate in a number 
of organizations on a regular basis including: Youth Advisory 
Committee, Association of Municipal Administrators of Youth and 
Family Service ( A .M . A . T . F . S . ) , Department of Social Service 
Norwood Area Board, AIDS Awareness Committee, and the Governors 
Alliance Against Drugs Task Force. Clinical supervision is 
provided bimonthly by Greater Boston Family Services in 
Needham, Catherine Spear, L.I.C.S.W. 



88 



Conferences attended include two on Peer Leadership programs 
and the A.M.A.Y.F.S. annual conference. 

The Outreach office is located on the second floor of the 
Town Hall. The telephone number is 359-7121 where messages may 
be left 24 hours a day. Informational brochures on a variety 
of issues are available in the office. 

The Board of Health holds its meetings on the second 
Tuesday evening at 6:30 P.M. and fourth Wednesday evening at 
7:30 P.M. at the Town Hall. These meetings are open to the 
public and citizens are invited to attend and participate. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward J. Toomey, Chairman 
William Tosches MD, Clerk 
Neil MacKenzie 










Ruth Chick selling refreshments at Annual Peak House Sale 



89 




: ■:.--. ■■ ■■ ■ ■ .■ 

:''::■.:■■: . '.■; ■ ■'■■■ ' ■■ ■ .' . .-.; ■. :■ ' . ■ • 




fir . -V 






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The Raising of the First Parish Church Steeple 



90 











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1/ 





"» • np 



91 



INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is our annual report for the year ending 
December 31 , 1 988: 

DEPARTMENT PERMITS INSPECTIONS INCOME EXPENSES 

1988 1987 1988 1987 1988 1987 1988 1987 

BUILDING 273 259 1340 1055 $43,929 $25,462 $20,597 $15,087 

PLUMBING 324 162 314 180 6,972 6,082 3,747 2,660 

GAS 95 122 142 73 2,621 2,139 2,697 1,033 

WIRING 298 295 617 643 11,285 9,536 9^75 9,883 

Total revenue from the issuance of permits and fees for 
inspections for the calendar year 1988 was $64,807.00 as 
compared to $43,219.00 in 1987. Expenses for 1988 were 
$36,916.00 as compared to $28,663-00 in 1987. 

BUILDING INSPECTION 

A breakdown of building permits issued is listed below: 

New single family dwellings 34 

Additions to private dwellings 90 

Renovations to private dwellings 43 

Additions to business & industrial buildings 7 

Renovation to business & industrial buildings 6 

New industrial/business buildings 1 

Reshingling roof & installation of new 3idewalls 22 

Private swimming pools 17 

Accessory buildings 8 

Residential garages 8 

Demolitions 5 

Tents (temporary) 5 

Signs 5 

Stoves (solid fuel burning/chimneys) 16 
Multifamily dwellings (includes single owner 

townhouses with total of 27 dwelling units) 4 

Foundations 3_ 

TOTAL 273 

Occupancy certificates were issued for 41 new residences in 
1988 as compared to 42 in 1987. 

Inspections for certification of business, schools, multifamily 
dwellings, nursing homes and nursery schools amounted to 27 
inspections for 1988. 



92 



Estimated construction costs on permits issued: 

1988 



New Dwellings 

Renovations & additions, pools, 

shingling, sidewalls, etc. on 

residential 
New construction Dusiness and 

indust ry 
Renovations & additions business 

and industry 
Multifamily buildings (includes 27 

single owner townhouse dwellings) 



$5,470,000 

2,904,000 

759,000 

3,761 ,000 

2,817,200 



1987 
$7,525,000 

2,447,454 

1 ,744,000 

74,000 





Enforcement of the State Building Code continues to be the 
responsibility of the local building inspectors. Section 
109.1.1 of that code requires all permit applicants to have 
State Construction Supervisor's licenses unless they are the 
property owner. The office of the Inspection Department must 
keep an accurate registration of license holders in order to 
assure compliance with Section 1 09 • 1 • 1 The building inspectors 
continue the enforcement of the code by making annual 
inspections of schools, churches and rest homes as well as 
other places of assembly. 



effe 

part 

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Buil 

f ocu 

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The 

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In 
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To 
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The 
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courses 
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and occ 
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nalvsis 



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State 
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loads 
using 



The Inspector of Buildings also serves the town in the 
capacity of Enforcing Officer for Zoning and as such devotes 
many hours to investigation and enforcement of the Zoning Bylaw 
of the Town. 

The assistance and .cooperation of Fire Chief Ryan in the 
inspection of smoke detectors in new construction and additions 
and renovations was greatly appreciated. The Chief and the 
Inspectors continue to inspect the installation of solid fuel 
burning appliances with an ever continuing number of residents 
placing them into their homes. The residents are again 
reminded of the importance of having their wood stove 
installations inspected and certified in accordance with 
requirements of the Massachusetts State Building Code. 



93 



PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTION 



numb 

enf o 

CMR 

Fuel 

gas 

rela 

refe 

Fitt 

Mass 

for 

insu 

the 



As in 

er we r 

rcement 

2.00 th 

Gas C 

inspec 
tion t 
rrals 
ers. 
achuset 

plumbi 
ranee 
Inspect 



pa 
e c 

in 
e Un 
ode 
tors 
o v 
to t 
The 
ts 
ng 
has 
ion 



st y 
once 
conn 
ifor 
is t 

• 

iola 

he S 

amen 

Gene 

or 

been 

Depa 



ears, of the above listed inspections, a 
rned with investigation, administration or 
ection with violations. Enforcement of 248 
m State Plumbing Code and the Massachusetts 
he responsibility of the local plumbing and 
Letters and telephone calls were made in 
tions of these state codes as well as 
tate Boards of Examiners of Plumbers and Gas 
dment of Section 21A of Chapter 142 of the 
ral Laws, requiring no permit to be Issued 
gasfitting work unless proof of liability 
filed with the town, is being enforced by 
rtment staff. 



WIRING INSPECTION 

The Wiring Inspector continues to enforce the 
Massachusetts Electric Code as well as the National Electric 
Code in his inspections of electric installations for which 
permits are issued. The 1987 ATM Bylaw requiring all new 
utility installations to be underground has added to the number 
of inspections under the jurisdiction of the Wiring Inspector 
for each new construction. The assistance of Tauno Aalto and 
James Leonard during the periodic absences of the Wiring 
Inspector was greatly appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John P. O'Toole, Inspector of Buildings 
Anthony Calo, Local Insp. of Buildings 
Joseph F. Erskine, Wiring Inspector 
John A. Rose, Jr., Plumbing Inspector 
Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 



94 



MEDFIELD HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Historical Commission submits herewith its 
sixteenth Annual Report for the calendar year 1988. 

The Medfield Historical Commission, appointed by the Board 
of Selectmen, is a legislated body mandated under state law. 
The primary duty of the Commission is to oversee the 
preservation, conservation, and restoration of all properties 
of historic significance. 

The Commission has grown in size over the past year. 
Recommendations were made to the Board of Selectmen for the 
appointment of one full member and five associate members to 
the Commission and appointments were confirmed and approved by 
the Selec tmen . 

The Commission has been, and is currently involved in many 
ongoing projects which include consulting with residents and 
developers on various historic restoration and construction 
projects. Many other projects in which the Commission is 
involved are educational in nature. Some projects which the 
commission has anticipated for completion for 1988 are still in 
progress. Because of stringent completion schedules, the 
commission always gives developments and restoration projects 
the highest priority. Unfortunately this places all other 
projects on hold. The following include the development and 
restoration projects in which the commission has been or is 
still involved . 

1 . HISTORIC PRESERVATION AWARD PROGRAM 

William R. Nutile was awarded the 1987 Medfield Historical 
Commission Historic Preservation Award for the preservation and 
restoration of the 1872 Oliver H. Clifford House, 5-7 Spring 
Street. The award was presented to William Nutile at a 
Selectman's Meeting. 

2 . HISTORIC PROPERTY INVENTORY PROGRAM 

This program continues to be an ongoing effort to create a 
detailed record of the historical properties in Medfield. The 
commission maintains on file, and continues to update, this 
listing of historical properties. The inventory includes 
houses and commercial properties built prior to 1900. So far, 
180 properties have been completed with 180 to be completed. 



95 



3. THE HISTORIC SIGNS PROGRAM 



This is p 
Commission prog 
town residents 
applications of 
property . Once 
date of the 
occupations , a re 
d isplay on the 
become quite p 
applications at 
The Commission 
owners to partic 
and aid the his 
the Commission 
Research and Dat 
available free 
merchants . The 
represents and 
dating process 
past year, the 
signs for hist 
1730-1881 . 



ro ba bly one of 
rams which histor 

can appreciate . 
individuals wi 
verified, signs n 
prope rty , and 

prepared on a co 
outside of the 
opular with num 
the commission' 
would like to enc 
ipate in this pro 
toric researching 

is working on a 
e you r Historic P 

at the Memorial 

Commission is al 
graphically illus 
in conjunction wi 
Commission has co 
oric residential 



the more visible Historical 
ic property owners and other 
This program researches 
th historically significant 
oting the original owner, the 
often the original owner's 
st basis ($35.00 per sign) for 
property. This program has 
erous individuals requesting 
s booth during Medfield Day. 
ourage more historic property 
gram. In an effort to educate 
process for property owners, 
pamphlet in 1989 on "How to 
roperty" which would be made 
Public Library and from town 
so organizing an exhibit that 
t rates the historic property 
th the Public Library. This 
mpleted four additional dated 
properties dating from C. 



4. HISTORIC TRAIL BROCHURE 



This His 
the public . 
demolition o 
updating and 
brochure is 
heritage of 
century Engl 
Elijah Thaye 
Revival, Vi 
structures . 
are not open 
held in eac 
brochure are 
Memorial Pub 
Medfield Day. 
Junior and Se 



toric T 
Howe 
f the 
plans t 

a wal 

the t 
ish Ye 
r bloc 
ctorian 

Most o 
to the 
h of t 

a vai la 

lie Lib 

They 

nior Hi 



rail 
ver , 

Dan 
o pu 
king 
own 
oman 
k, 

an 
f th 
publ 
he c 
ble 
ra ry 

a re 
gh S 



Brochure 
it has 
iel Curtis 
blish a re 

tour and 
center. 

style Pea 
pointing o 
d High V 
e propert i 
ic . Howev 
hurches on 
free of ch 

and at th 

also used 
chools . 



cont 
bee 
Hou 
vise 
guid 
It t 
k Ho 
ut C 
icto 
es a 
er, 

the 
arge 
e Co 
bv 



mue 
orae 
se . 
d br 
e t 
akes 
use 
olon 
rian 
re p 
Sund 
to 
at 
mmis 
clas 



s to 

out 

Th 

ochu 

o t 
you 

to t 

ial , 
I 

ri va 

ay s 

u r . 

the 

sion 

ses 



be a 
dated 
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re in 
he a 

fro 
he 1 

Fed 
talia 
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ervic 

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Town 
's b 
in th 



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1989. 
rchite 
m the 
9th C 
eral , 
nate 
sidenc 
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House 
ooth 
e Whe 



le to 

e the 

on is 

The 

ctural 

17th 

entury 

Greek 

style 

es and 

still 

f the 

, the 

during 

elock. 



5 . HISTORIC SLIDE PROGRAM 

The Commission's slide program on the "History of 
Medfield" continues to be made available to the public. The 
150-slide presentation shows the history of the town from 1649 
to the present and is available to any individual, group or 
organization in the Town of Medfield. In addition, the slide 
program has been duplicated and donated to the Medfield Public 
School system. The slide program is currently being shown in 
the schools as part of the social studies curriculum. The 
program is also in the process of being updated. 



96 



6. HISTORIC PRESERVATION REFERENCE MATERIALS 

Through its membership in the National Historic Trust, the 
Commission is kept aware of all current publications in the 
field of historic preservation. By special arrangement with 
the Medfield Memorial Public Library, all copies of sample 
items received by the Commission are put on deposit with the 
Public Library and are available for us by the public. 

7. HISTORIC ARTISTS SLIDE PROGRAM 



The Commission has prepared a slide program, "Me 
Painted by Her Artists, 1860-1930," which was presen 
past year before the Catholic Daughters of St. Edwar 
slide show focuses on the prominent American artists 
Barbizon and impressionist schools who painted u 
guidance of George Inness when he lived in Medfield. 
are artists and musicians who were summer residents 
Sewall's Boarding House on Main Street and the art ac 
Spring Street. This program will be shown again in 19 
public and is also available to individuals, gr 
organizations in the Town of Medfield. 



d field as 

ted this 

ds. The 

of the 

nder the 

Included 

of Mrs. 

ademy on 

89 to the 

oups and 



8. MEDFIELD DAY EXHIBIT 



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SPECIAL PROJECTS 

1 . UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST HOUSE (THE PARSONAGE) 

The Commission worked in conjunction with developer Walter 
Reynolds providing him with guidelines in order to help 
preserve the historical integrity of the Parsonage which he 
moved from Main Street to its current location on Brook Street. 
The house was converted to commercial office space and a new 
wing was added. The completed property today has retained its 
historic flavor and architectural style and is an example of 
the successful blending of the old with the new. 

2. TANNERY FARM PROPERTY 



The Commission has worked very closely with the DAVNA 
Development Corporation and their architectural firm providing 
guidance in preserving the C. 1798 Tannery Farm 



them with 



97 



House. The Commission has worked in hel 
architectural designs of the 13 homes which are 
on the historic Tannery property. It is import 
homes maintain the flavor of and be compa 
gracious Tannery house and the historic area o 
it is located. In addition, the Commission was 
helping to preserve one of the "older" sectio 
which was slated for demolition. DAVNA Corpo 
historic preservation consultant at the r 
Commission to also aid in planning the p 
addition of old and new properties on the site 
Farm House is going to be moved back to its or 
on the property. The Commission, with the a 
Historic District Study Committee, was i 
convincing DAVNA Corporation to include the Tan 
in the proposed Medfield Historic District 
section. The Historic District is being propos 
at Town Meeting in April 1989* 



ping plan the 
being developed 
ant that the new 
tible with the 
f town in which 
instrumental in 
ns of the house 
ration hired an 
equest of the 
reservation and 
The Tannery 
iginal location 
id of the Local 
nstrumental in 
nery Farm House 
--John Metcalf 
ed as an article 



3- MEDFIELD CROSSING PROJECT 

The Commission met with the developer of Medfield Crossing 
Corporation and their architectural firm and has provided 
guidelines for restoring and preserving the 1652 Joshua Fisher 
House and recommendations for the new condominiums which are 
being developed adjacent to the Joshua Fisher House. Together, 
these structures comprise the Medfield Crossing development at 
435 Main Street. The Joshua Fisher house is being converted 
from a multifamily rental property to condominium units. 

4. PRENTISS PLACE PROJECT 

The Commission worked in conjunction with Prentiss Place 
Realty Trust in an effort to preserve the two historic homes 
located on the property. The Prentiss Place residential 
condominium community has retained the historical period 
styling of the C. 1750 Dr. Thomas Prentiss Parsonage and the C. 
1745 Lowell Mason Tavern which are the two historic properties 
included in the development. Prentiss Place is located on 
North Street and has 24 residential units in phase 1 of the 
two-phase project. 

5. GRIST MILL QUARRY SITE 

The Commission was instrumental in helping preserve and 
protect a grist mill stone quarry site discovered off Lakewood 
Terrace. The site was slated for a housing development and the 
Commission brought the importance of preserving the site to the 
attention of Jack Copeland of Copeland Associates, Boston. The 
mill stone site is located on an 8-acre parcel of land which 
was proposed as a four-house development. Mr. Copeland 
recognized the importance of preserving the site and has 
donated to the town the section of the land on which the mill 
stones stand. The Commission has also inventoried the site for 
submission to the Massachusetts Historical Commission. 



98 



6. LOCAL HISTORIC DISTRICT PROJECT 

The Commission recommended six qualified individuals who 
meet the criteria mandated by the Historic District Act, 
Chapter 40C of the General Laws as part of the Historic 
District Legislation in Massachusetts to the Board of Selectmen 
for appointment to the Local Historic District Study Committee. 

The study committee nominees were approved and have 
completed a preliminary report of the proposed Medfield 
Historic District-- John Metcalf section. The proposed district 
is being submitted as an article to be voted on at the Town 
Meeting, April 1989. If the article passes by a two-thirds 
majority vote at Town Meeting, the Historic District will be 
adopted and an Historic District Commission will be appointed. 
Members of the Historic District Study Committee are: Robert 
M. Mannino, Jr., Chairman; Carol Thompson, Robert Blair, David 
Lodge, Donald MacDonald, and John Hooper. 

7. TOWN LIBRARY DISPLAY 

The Commission is currently organizing a display which 
will exhibit the Historic Sign Program and the Preservation 
Award Program to the public. To be set up at the Public 
Library, the display will also feature publications and 
information available to residents interested in the research 
and preservation of historic properties. Display cases for the 
exhibit were donated by Medfield resident Robert DeVita of 
Underground Camera in Foxborough. 

8. MEDFIELD TOWN HOUSE RESTORATION 



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9. PUBLIC RELATIONS 

The local press has given the Commission and its projects 
a healthy amount of space this past year and the Commission 
feels that this is a most effective way to raise the public's 
awareness level. The Commission has made concerted efforts to 
keep the media well informed of local issues and human interest 
events that are historically relevant to the Town and its 
residents . 



99 



Historical Commission would like to thank all those 
residents who generously offered their support, 
and consideration this past year to Commission 
is essential that preservation be given a top 
issues of development arise. The Commission, 
from Town Administration and residents, is 
upholding and preserving Medfield's historical 
character and integrity in order that future generations may 
enjoy the beauty of our town as we know it. 



The 
Medf ield 
dona t ions 
projects, 
priority 
with support 
committed to 



It 
when 



Respectfully submitted, 

Robert M. Mannino, Jr., Chairman 

David Wilmarth, Secretary 

Paul Nyren, Treasurer 

Eleanor Anes 

Donald J. MacDonald 

Ann Mentzer 

Electa Tritsch 

Richard P. DeSorgher, Associate Member 

Patricia Fontecchio, Associate Member 

Joyce Goodwin, Associate Member 

John Hooper, Associate Member 

Robert Blair, Associate Member 

David Temple, Associate Member 

Robert Dellaselva, Associate Member 




Historic Millstone discovered offLakewood Terrace 



100 




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101 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Housing Authority is pleased to submit its 
Annual Report for 1988. 

The Authority is authorized by and operates under the 
provisions of Chapter 121B of the Massachusetts General Laws. 
It is entirely funded through the Executive Office of 
Communities and Development of the Commonwealth of MA. and is 
responsible to EOCD for the management of Tilden Village. 
Modernization funds were received and utilized toward property 
improvement. Accomplishments included exterior and interior 
painting of common areas, caulking of windows, and painting of 
individual units. Hopefully, the remaining work will be 
completed early in 1989* 



dection, the Authority was fortunate 
:ted Richard M. Denton to a five year t< 



In the March election, the Authority was fortunate that 
the Town reelected Richard M. Denton to a five year term. 



The Commissioners and Executive Director have attended 
workshops and conferences throughout the year. Commissioner 
Richard Denton represented the Authority on the Medfield 
Housing Partnership Committee. This Committee continues to 
pursue affordable subsidized rental housing and affordable 
homeownership . The Town approved a proposal that allowed for 
the transfer of a parcel of Town land to be utilized for this 
purpose . 

The Medfield Housing Authority encourages interested 
applicants to take advantage of the opportunity to apply for 
housing at Tilden Village. Please contact the Executive 
Director, Marie K. Roberts, at 359-6454 Monday through Thursday 
mornings for an application. Some of the eligibility 
requirements are as follows: minimum age is 62 years, maximum 
net income for one person is $18,144 and total assets may not 
exceed $15,000. Qualified Medfield residents and members of 
minority groups will be given preference in placement. 
Questions pertaining to this housing should be directed to Mrs. 
Roberts at her office at Tilden Village. 



102 



The Medfield Housing Authority meets on the third Monday 
of each month at 7:30 P.M. in the office at 30 Pound Street. 
The general public is welcome to attend these meetings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Diane Nightingale, Chairman 

Ralph K. Maider, Jr., Vice Chairman 

Richard M. Denton, Treasurer 

Arthur L. Farrar, Assistant Treasurer 

Cecilia M. Haney, Secretary 




Arthur Farrar wearing one of his many hats. Here he oversees the 
Barbecue for the Booster Club at Medfield Day. 



103 



MEDFIELD-NORFOLK PRISON 
PROJECT SCREENING COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

It is with great pleasure I submit my report for the 
Medfield Prison Project, this year. 

Due to a moratorium imposed by the Department of Mental 
Health, we experienced a decline in inmate count from maximum 
of 36 to 12. 

Fortunately, a new agreement has been signed and we have 
begun to interview to bring the count back to maximum. 

The new agreement has an article that states; three to 
five inmates shall perform civic work for the Town of Medfield 
at a minimum of one eight-hour day per week. For our town this 
is an asset. We shall endeavor to recruit for talent that is 
needed to benefit, town projects. 

The civic crew this year completed many projects to 
benefit the town. This list includes: painting at the High 
School, painted exterior of the Library, painted interior 
offices in the Town Hall, stained salt shed for the Highway 
Department, painted and repaired fences and posts on roadsides, 
worked at Pfaff Center painting, planting shrubs, building 
ramps and doorways, and toilets for the handicapped. They 
repaired Little League dugouts and playing fields and worked at 
the Hinkley Swim Pond. 

With the decline in population . to a minimum, the Selectmen 
allowed a second crew from Bay State Correctional Center in 
Norfolk to work in town. 

We were indeed fortunate to obtain this additional help. 
This group worked steady for seven months at the cemetery. One 
only has to visit to see what they've accomplished there. 
Since cold weather this crew prepared and painted the interior 
of the Sewerage Treatment Plant and are now painting at the 
highway department. 



104 



We owe a large vote of thanks to Superintendent George 

Grigas for allowing this crew to work in Medfield. The men 

look forward to the future in hope of contributing to the town 

in whatever way we may need them. The thrust of the program 

has changed with the new contract. Inmates will no longer be 

working in wards with contact with patients. They will perform 
maintenance and ianitorial duties. 



The Town Advisory Committee met several times to discuss 
issues during the year. This communication does much to 
understnad and correct problems on both sides. The openness 
between Corrections and the Town has benefited all concerned. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Arthur L . Fa rra r 
Town Representative 

MEDFIELD PRISON PROJECT 
SCREENING COMMITTEE 




sS 4 

- 

Matthew and Debra Gaines sell baked goods at Peak House Sale 



105 



TRUSTEES OF THE MEMORIAL 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Board of Trustees of the Memorial Public Library is 
pleased to submit its annual report for year 1988. The 
Trustees thank Library Director Jane Archer and her able staff 
for another year of quality materials selection, interesting 
programs, and friendly, professional service. Everyone from 
the library director to high school library assistants is to be 
commended for their willingness to go that extra step to help 
patrons. Book selection, use of the reference collection, 
meeting and reading rooms has increased, as has participation 
in the various programs offered. The Trustees feel that these 
increases are a reflection of the outstanding work of our 
staff. 

1988 was a year of continuing growth and change for 
Memorial Public Library. After much study and fund-raising, 
Medfield signed a contract to join the Minuteman Library 
Network which will provide the citizens of Medfield access to 
over 500,000 book titles and enhanced library services. This 
enormous undertaking could not have taken place without the 
support and encouragement of the residents of Medfield and 
various Town Boards, notably the Selectmen, Capital Budget 
Committee, and Warrant Committee. The Trustees would also like 
to thank the Friends of the Library and our local business 
community, whose generous contributions have funded 20/6 of this 
project . 

Memorial Public Library is truly a community resource. By 
working within our allocated budget, using donations, and 
applying for state and Federal grants, the library has been 
able to provide a wide variety of materials, services, and 
programs for all the citizens of Medfield. An updated 
reference collection, a cooperative Books-on-Tape grant, the 
beginning of a compact disc collection, the Friends of the 
Library "Wish Book", and, most importantly, new books have all 
increased materials available in all mediums to residents of 
all ages. Interlibrary loans, museum passes, and the new 
public typewriter courtesy of the Friends of the Library are a 
few examples of the myriad of services offered. Programs for 
all ages and interests, on topics as diverse as "An Evening 
with Medfield Authors" to ribbon wreaths, from Toddler Time to 
a tax program with the IRS, were all sponsored by the library 
staff and the Friends of the Library. 

The Trustees, with Jane Archer's assistance, have started 
to update and revise existing policies to reflect the changes 
in our library. Undergoing change in the past year were the 
book selection policy, employee development policy and the 
trustee manual. Job descriptions have been updated to reflect 
additional duties as well as the necessary computer expertise 



106 



needed to work in our library. It is also hoped that the 
position of Senior Library Assistant will soon be upgraded to 
reflect the importance of the position. 



comple 
Medf ie 
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Respectfully submitted, 

Maura McNicholas, Chairman 
Ann Williams, Secretary 
David Allan, Bill Signer 
Richard Fitzpatrick 
Michael Howard 




Barbara Monaghan, L.W.V. presents "Know Your Town" to library aides 



107 



MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

1988 will be remembered as the year that our library 
entered the Electronic Age. Thanks to the support of your 
Board, the Capital Budget Committee, Friends of the Library, 
and local businesses, funding was made available to join the 
Minuteman Library Network, an automated resource sharing 
cooperative consisting of 22 libraries in our geographic area. 
The collections of these libraries, totaling over 1/2 million 
different titles, will be able to be accessed by our residents 
through the use of computers in our library. This important 
step was taken because the reality is that no library can 
provide all of the materials needed by its citizens. Through 
the use of an electronic reserve system, the Network will 
enable a hold to be placed on needed materials owned by another 
library which can then quickly be delivered by one of the 
Eastern Massachusetts Regional Library vans at no charge. 

Our staff has received the necessary training to input 
M.edfield's books into the system and is currently working on 
this project. Since the Network requires that this task be 
completed before a library can go on-line, it is anticipated 
that Medfield will become operational in late 1 989 » We look 
forward to this quantum leap in the provision of informational 
services to the community. 

Over the past two years, there has been a significant 
growth in circulation statistics even though Medfield's 
population has remained relatively stable. We believe the 7% 
increase in 1987 and the 8% increase in 1988 is due to several 
factors: the greater than usual number of new books added to 
our collection thanks to a special state grant of $10,000; the 
addition of popular non-print materials such as videos and 
books on tape; and a growth in the preschool population which 
has led to increased circulation by the parents of this age 
group who believe in the importance of sharing books with their 
children at an early age. 

The books on tape collection mentioned above was a new 
addition to our collection in 1988 and has been extremely 
popular especially with those who commute to work by car. 
Because the collection of over 300 titles was purchased 
cooperatively with the public libraries in Westwood, Walpole, 
and Norwood, it is shared equally on a rotating basis. Titles 
include popular novels, classics, old time radio, business, 
self-help and other nonfiction tapes. 



108 



Major purchases were made during the year in literature 
and biographical reference materials which are subject areas 
used heavily by students. We are also pleased to report that 
1988 was the first year that professional reference service was 
provided all the hours the library is open. Our budget allowed 
us to hire several part-time reference librarians who work 
evenings, and weekends, thus ensuring that people who come in 
during these hours receive the same high quality service 
daytime users receive. 



as 



The library staff and Friends of the Library continue to 
offer a variety of programs for the community. The most 
acclaimed was a "Meet Medfield's Authors" program which offered 
the opportunity to hear seven published writers tell about 
their books . 

Activity in the Children's Room reached an all time high 
in 1988 with over 25,000 books and other materials borrowed 
during the year. This represents a 10$ increase over 1987 
circulations figures. The growth in the preschool population 
necessitated adding several sessions of Toddler Time and Story 
Hour to meet the demand. 

The Friends of the Library worked hard to provide strong 
support to the library by (l) sponsoring numerous programs for 
adults and children; (2) offering special services such as 
passes to museums, the best seller rental collection, a 
scholarship award; and (}) undertaking fund-raising projects. 
Their fund-raising efforts have been so successful that they 
were able to contribute $10,000 this year to help underwrite 
the start-up costs of joining the Minuteman Network. A 
heartfelt thanks is offered to the officers and volunteers who 
contributed to a very successful year. 

A significant number of monetary contributions have been 
made to the library during the year be townspeople, 
organizations, and businesses to help support the quality and 
quantity of materials and services we can offer to the 
community. It is not possible to name each of them in this 
report, but I do wish to, single out four businesses who made 
major contributions to our Minuteman Library Network 
fund-raising campaign. They are Arrow Business Forms, Childs 
Engineering, FDC Packaging, and Bank of Boston. A very special 
thanks to these businesses and to all who supported the library 
in 1988. 



109 



I would also like to express my appreciation to the Board 
of Trustees who continue to provide direction and support in 
the pursuit of providing excellence in library services. 
Finally, I would like to thank the library staff who all do an 
outstanding job. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Jane B. Archer, 
Library Director 



STATISTICS FOR 1988 



Circulation 

Adult 
Juvenile 

Materials Purchased 
Adult 
Juvenile 

Total Materials Owned 
New Borrowers 



61 
25 


,419 
,426 


1 


,408 
573 


34 


,509 
976 



110 



NORFOLK CO. MOSQUITO 
CONTROL PROJECT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Operational Project Program integrates all proven 
technologies into a system of mosquito control that is 
rational, safe, effective, and economically feasible. 

All mosquito eggs need water to hatch to sustain larval 
growth . 

SOURCE REDUCTION WORK: Our primary efforts are 
concentrated on the drainage of shallow, standing, stagnant 
water, and the maintenance of existing flow systems which 
contribute to mosquito breeding sources. 

Drainage ditches cleaned 210 feet 

Brush obstructing drainage cut 2,012 feet 

Drainage construction by wide-track backhoe 5,380 feet 

LARVICIDING: Treatment of mosquito larvae during aquatic 
development is the next most effective control effort. 

Larvicide by backpack and mistblowers 160 

ac res 

Catch basin larvicide application 430 

count 

ADULTICIDING : The suppression of flying adult mosquitoes 
become necessary when they are numerous, annoying, or 
threatening to residents. 

Adulticide with mistblowers 503 

ac res 

Adulticide U.L.V. from trucks 16,320 

acres 

Surveys, inspections, and monitoring in support of our program 
include locating and mapping breeding areas, larval and adult 
collections, and field work evaluations leading to better 
d rainage . 

The Project received 311 calls from residents for information 
and assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John J . Smith, 
Supe rintendent 



111 



OPEN SPACE PLANNING COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Open Space Planning Committee hereby submits its 
annual report for 1988. 

Following through on a project begun in 1987 with a grant 
from the Bay Circuit Program (within the Massachusetts 
Department of Environmental Management), the committee 
completed a new long-range plan for open space and recreation 
in Medfield, and also brought up to date the master plan for 
drainage. 

The planning study was undertaken with the help of Wagner 
Associates, a Framingham land use consultant, and was carried 
out by an active committee of residents representing several 
Town Boards and other interests. The County Engineers made a 
significant contribution to the drainage study, as did the Town 
Highway Department. 

The committee's work culminated in a forum for 
consideration of the recommended five-year "Action Program" at 
the wonderful old warming lodge at Rocky Woods, kindness of 
Steve Bassett and the Trustees of Reservations. Many attended 
and offered ideas and encouragement for putting the plan into 
action . 

The five-year plan is based on five major goals for open 
space and two for recreation, with specific objectives and 
actions recommended for each goal on a five-year timetable. 
The goals of the open space plan, the "heart" of the study, are 
as follows : 

1. Protect natural and historic resources 

2. Link existing open space areas 

3. Foster use of existing open space 

4. Manage and improve open lands 

5. Forecast needs for additional public land 



112 



The committee was pleased to see quick action by the town 
in carrying out some of its aquifer protection recommendations 
immediately as they were proposed. We are hopeful that many of 
the other elements of the plan will generate the same kind of 
work and enthusiasm. It will require both if we are to 
continue preserving and wisely using our open lands and our 
precious natural and historic resources. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Margaret E. Bancroft, Chairman 

Kenneth P. Feeney 

Jesse L. Matuson 

Eric W. ' Brien 

Hanson C. Robbins 

Martha L . Smick 

Michael J. Sullivan 




Meeting House Pond 



113 



PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The refurbishing of Park and Recreation facilities has 
continued this year with the total refurbishing of the interior 
and exterior of the Pond House at Hinkley Park. The interior 
was paneled, a new ceiling, new lighting, refrigeration, and 
electrical work was done. The exterior was repainted a Cape 
Cod Gray to make it more New England in appearance. 

The Commission made arrangements with the Council on Aging 
for the usage of the Pfaff Center for its programs. The 
Commission leased one room to the Council plus other usage of 
areas during the daytime hours for their hot lunch program and 
activity classes. In addition, it has allowed them to have 
Monday thru Friday daytime office space at the Center for their 
Director; this has allowed all senior activities to be operated 
out of the Pfaff Center for the first time. 

The Commission's tot and young people's programs during 
the daytime hours at the Center under the direction of Marge 
Monahan have provided activities for 200-300 young people this 
past year and are well received by the community. 

Our ski program under the direction of Commissioner 
Margaret Maider were successful again this year. A new 
dimension was added with the help of Bill Miner (Miner's 
Sportworld). He has arranged several ski trips to various ski 
resorts for youth this past year with a large number of youth 
pa rticipating . 

The programs at Hinkley Pond under the direction of 
Commissioner William "Jack" Heller and Pond Director, Peter 
Panciocco were again successful. Our swim team in the Suburban 
Swim League, placed second, and won a runner-up trophy. The 
Pond water was tested by an outside agency and was found to be 
like tap water, and received high rating for its cleanliness. 

The Park Commission has requested that when the Kingsbury 
Pond area is purchased by the Town, that it be given 
jurisdiction over the area to operate a skating program and 
other recreational programs. 

The Youth Baseball Program (Little League, Babe Ruth) in 
Medfield, should be commended for its outstanding efforts in 
restoring all the baseball diamonds in Medfield. Through their 
fund raising efforts they have restored all the High School 
fields, Capers field, Memorial Little League field and High 
School softball fields. 



114 



The Youth Activities Commission under the Advisory 
Commissioners Jack Heller and Mary Gillis, had a full agenda, 
and their report is included in this years Annual Town Report. 

The tennis instructional program under the Director, Beth 
Eby, had its largest number of participants to date. The 
Commission this year reorganized the policies and procedures 
for the usage of the public courts to allow more time for youth 
and public usage by reducing school and group reservation time. 

The Park and Recreation on October 30, 1988, dedicated the 
large activities room at the Hannah Adams Pfaff Community 
Center in Memory of Shannon D. McCormack, a young woman who had 
died of cancer. Shannon was the type of exemplary youth, an 
outstanding athlete, scholar and citizen of Medfield. In her 
memory her family raised funds to provide housing for parents 
who need to be with their young people during the periods of 
cancer treatment at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. 
We were pleased to be a part of this. 

The Commission sponsored programs were all successful 
thanks to the hundred of volunteers who provided their time and 
resource . 



( a ) Little League 

(b) Babe Ruth League 

(c) Medfield Youth Hockey 

( d ) Youth Soccer 

(e) Youth Tennis 

(f) Youth Swimming 

(g) Youth Bowling 
(h) C.Y.O. Basketball 
(i) Girl's summer softball 
(j) Youth Skiing 

(t) 
(u) 
(v) 



(k) Pop Warner football 

(l) Skating program 

(m) American Legion 

(n) Men's softball 

(o) M.O.T.H. softball 

(p) Adult Soccer program 

(q) Adult Volleyball 

Base ball 

(r) Adult Basketball 

(s) Ultimate Frisbee 

Karate 

Summer Baseball program 

Youth/Tots programs 



The Park and Recreation Commission will continue the 
upgrading of all its facilities and would like to express its 
appreciation to the Bay State prison and Medfield Prison 
program for providing the needed manpower to help accomplish 
these goals and objectives. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert W. Miller, Chairman 
William Heller, Vice Chairman 
Margaret Maider, Secretary 
Mary V. Gillis, Commissioner 
Scott Dube', Commissioner 



115 





Proud and enthusiastic volunteers at "Clean Up Medfield Day" and 
Selectman Thompson passin3 out certificates to volunteers. 



116 



TREE AND INSECT PEST 
CONTROL DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report is for the calendar year ending December 31, 
1 988. 

Along with regular maintenance of trees, thirty new trees 
were planted throughout the town. They were sugar maple, red 
oak, cherry, skyline honeylocust, and little leaf linden. They 
replaced trees which had to be removed either from disease or 
new construction. We also planted thirty white pine trees at 
the Waste Water Treatment Plant to screen the Treatment Plant 
from the road and houses. 

The stump removal program is progressing this year as we 
recently removed fifteen stumps throughout the town. 

Residents are reminded that if they DO NOT wish spraying 
to be done on their property, prior notice must be given no 
later than March 1 to the Town Clerk by registered mail. This 
notice must be given each year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward M. Hinkley 
TREE WARDEN 

DIRECTOR OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 



117 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is my annual report for the fiscal year of 
1988. 

The following scales, weights, liquid measuring meters and 
linear measures were sealed. 

Scales: 10 lbs. - 100 lbs. 17 

Liquid Meters: Gasoline 43 

Linear Measures: Yardsticks 4 

Miscellaneous inspections: 8 

The inspection fees totaled for this fiscal year $1,988.80 

Respectfully submitted, 

Patricia A. Rioux 

SEALER OF WEIGHT AND MEASSURES 



118 



TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL TECHNICAL 
VOCATIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In July 1988, the School Committee reorganized and the 
elected officers are: 

Melvin Long (Norfolk) Chairman 

Charles Mucciarone (Franklin) Vice-Chairman 

Ernest Sandland (North Attleboro) Secretary 

The School Committee conducts its regularly scheduled 
meetings on the first and third Wednesday of each month at 8:00 
P.M. in the Committee Meeting Room at the school. From the 
beginning of November until the end of February, the Committee 
meets on the second and fourth Wednesdays specifically for the 
purpose of budget development. Subcommittee meetings are 
scheduled as needed. 

GRADUATION 

On June 5, 1988, 186 students were graduated in an 
impressive afternoon ceremony. Chairman Robert Rappa delivered 
the Address of Welcome to more than one thousand guests. Music 
was provided by the Southeastern Massachusetts Community Band. 

Peter Rickard, Director of Guidance and Special Needs, 
presented scholarships and awards totaling more than $25,000 to 
deserving seniors. Four students received Commonwealth 
Scholarships for outstanding achievement: Daryl Densmore, 
Elizabeth Mazzeo, and Paul Young of Franklin and Jamie Miller 
from Walpole. 

Medfield organizations that provided scholarship awards 
were Hannah Adams Women's Club to Gerald Muccaccio and Medfield 
Employers and Merchants Organization to James Abrams and Gerald 
Muccaccio. 

GUIDANCE AND SPECIAL EDUCATION 

During the 1987-88 school year, Tri-County hosted its 
first College Fair where representatives from 18 pos t -s e r nnda ry 
schools came to Tri-County to share information with college 
bound seniors enrolled at Tri-County. 

In September 1988 with the start of a new school year, 
Tri-County also began an expansion of our ninth grade 
exploratory program which now will allow our freshmen to try 
out nine different areas of interest. This program which truly 
is the best vocational evaluation known, also will require 



119 



students to explore areas which are non-traditional by gender. 
It is hoped that more students will select non-traditional 
areas and that any stigma which may exist for those who do will 
be lessened by this experience. 

During the past year Tri-County was selected as a 
demonstration site for a commercial computer-operated career 
guidance system. This program operates on a video laser disk 
and computer which together allow students to assess their 
interests and abilities and match these with careers. A great 
deal of information is available through this system regarding 
secondary and post-secondary programs. A complete college 
search program is included with this including financial aid 
info rma t ion . 

GOVERNOR'S ALLIANCE AGAINST DRUGS 

A grant from the Governor's Alliance Against Drugs has 
allowed Tri-County to offer a health program for all 9th grade 
students. The school also provided to its students a three 
screened presentation on decision making which was made 
possible through the Consortium for the Prevention of Substance 
Abuse . 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 



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In the continuing effort of Tri-County to provide its 
students with the best possible preparation for work and 
college, this year saw the initial preparations for the 
incorporation of an Applied Physics program. This up-to-date 
offering will allow students to develop an understanding of the 
physical laws of science through their application. Later this 
school year the Math Department will be instituting a math lab. 
This developmental program will provide teachers and students 
with a powerful new teaching and learning tool. 

Tri-County's newest academic advancement has it greatest 
impact on you, Tri-County's adult constituency. Massachusetts 
Bay Community College is offering evening classes to all area 
adults. These credit-granting courses will be offered at 
Tri-County two nights a week and permit adults to pursue an 
associate degree program or to simply partake in enrichment 
of f e rings . 



120 



This year and in the years to come Tri-County will 
continue to offer its students the best and most relevant 
preparation for work or college. 

VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS 

We continue to give priority to upgrading curricula and 
equipment in an effort to stay abreast of technological 
advances in the machine, automotive and building trades. 

The Sun Interrogator, the latest diagnostic tester, and 
the Under 4-Wheel Aligning Machine are used to train our upper 
class Auto Repair students. Job placement is high and small 
business ventures are showing up in our early graduates. 

The curriculum of oxy-acetylene , arc, and mig/tig welding 
has adapted new dimensions. There are new incentives since 
training for certification programs have been added. 
Tri-County students will now receive training for "Limited 
Thickness Certification", "Unlimited Certification", and "Pipe 
Welding Certification". Many students will acquire all three 
certifications by the time they reach their senior year. All 
certification standards are set by the American Welding Society 
Code. Our graduates are in demand as jobs are plentiful. 

Solid State/Motor Control curriculum have been developed 
and becomes a part of the uppergrade programs. Grade 11 and 
Grade 12 students, with their instructors, are providing a 
completely new wiring system with fixtures and including a new 
service installation for the Medway Fire Station No. 2. Job 
opportunities and self employment rank high in the Electrical 
Program . 

TECHNICAL PROGRAMS 

Distributive Education continues to expand their program 
by offering students instruction in the areas of legal and 
medical secretarial office skills. Along with Retailing and 
Banking instruction, the students are mastering skills in 
Computerized Accounting, Data Base Management and Lotus 1-2-3. 

The Culinary Arts Shop has accommodated a student teacher 
from Johnson <& Wales College and his expertise in cake 
decorating is adding a new dimension to the program. 

Commercial Art has received their new Desk Top Publishing 
equipment and instructors are preparing students for their new 
learning experience. 

The Child Care Shop continues to attract large numbers of 
toddlers and preschoolers into their program from area towns 
and a waiting list is maintained. 



121 



Cosmetology has a new look this year 
reconditioned chairs and newly painted walls, 
manicuring along with hair care continues to 
popular program for area residents. The clinic 
members of the community during the school year. 



with their 

Facial and 

make this a 

is open to 



Drafting, Electronics and Graphic Arts Departments 
continue to up-grade their software programs which provide 
valuable skills for today's changing job market. 

EVENING SCHOOL 

Approximately 450 adults are enrolled in our Evening 
School programs. Air Conditioning and Refrigeration, Baking 
and Cake Decorating, Word Processing, and Manicuring are new 
programs due to increased interest in these skilled areas. The 
Mandatory Code Review Course for Licensed Electricians 
continues to be held on assigned Saturdays during the school 
year. 

ATHLETICS 

"Athletics" at Tri-County this year has been looked at as 
"Building for the Future" as a strong group of freshmen and 
sophomore athletes have emerged to play a major role in the 
interscholast ic sports programs of fall and winter. 

Taking the place of retired Athletic Director Bill 
Doucette is Cliff Wilson, who brings a fresh new outsider's 
view of things and is the mover behind the phase of "Building 
for the Future". 

With new emphasis on upgrading coaches' awareness, 
creating better athletic facilities, getting new equipment, and 
working on school recruitment, it is hoped a new 
competitiveness can emerge on all sport teams resulting in a 
much stronger athletic program. 

This year the sports being offered for the fall and winter 
months are football, volleyball, soccer, and basketball for 
boys and girls, and wrestling. During the spring baseball, 
softball and track will be offered. 

During the fall, one of our coaches, Brian McDonough, 
received Coach of the Year for football in the Mayflower 
League. Also receiving all-league honors for football was Dave 
Wallace (Millis). 

Our volleyball team was led this year by two all-league 
players, Karen Smutek (Seekonk) and Courtney Cerce (North 
Attleboro), who both return next year with the rest of this 
vea r ' s team. 



122 



Soccer looks forward to returning ten freshmen and doing 
more recruitment. All-league forward John Marshall (Seekonk) 
will be missed . 

All of our winter teams have gotten off to a fast start 
and with the nucleus of each of the three teams returning, 
continued improvement is seen. 

It is the goal of the athletic program to continue to 
upgrade and recruit and to provide the best programs possible 
in each sport . 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Tri-County offers many activities for students to 
participate in either during school or after school. There are 
two ongoing vocational student organizations, VICA and DECA. 
The Vocational Industrial Clubs of America sponsors contests in 
over forty skill areas nationwide, while the Distributive 
Education Clubs of American sponsor contests in all aspects of 
retail marketing. 

Tri-County started a cultural exchange program two years 
ago which is open to all students in all grade levels. The 
first year students visited the Eskimo village of Kipmuk in 
Alaska and the village of Tuntihuliak the following year. In 
the Spring of 1989 Tri-County students will participate in an 
exchange with the Soviet Union and American Indians in Phoenix, 
Arizona . 

Tri-County's Student Council has been very active this 
year attending meetings at the Central Regional Office of the 
State Department of Education to discuss statewide legislation 
in regard to student issues. The Student Council also raised 
over $1,000 for the WEEI FM 59 Fund. 

Tri-County offers students many opportunities to 

participate in programs that promote vocational and academic 

excellence as well as training in leadership essential to 
future success . 

SUMMARY 

As we move into 1989 and continue to provide the best in 
educational needs to our students, we thank the district 
residents for their support and cooperation. We intend to 
maintain in the future the high educational standards that have 
earned us that support in the past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Melvin C. Long, Chairman 
Albert C. Chouinard, Medfield 



123 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is a breakdown of service and assistance 
rendered Medfield Veterans and their dependents as authorized 
by the Commissioner of Veterans' Services for the period ending 
December 31 » 1988. The state reimburses the town seventy-five 
percent of the benefits. 

This assistance includes fuel, clothing, food, housing, 
and medical expenses for Veterans and their families. 

VETERANS' SERVICES 

Hospitalization 2 

Education 1 

Burial Allowance 16 

Social Security 21 

Pension Assistance 32 

VETERANS' BENEFITS 

Application for Ordinary Assistance 8 

Benefits Administered 3 

I wish to thank Town Officials for their assistance during 
the yea r. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul F . Curran , 
VETERANS' AGENT 



124 




Frank Mayer, V.F. W. placing Memorial Wreath at Town House 




Memorial Day Parade 
125 



YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Commission this year 1988-89 consists of the 
following: 

Joseph DiGiovanni, President 

Robert Wallace, Vice President 

Jeff DiGiovanni, Secretary 

Gerry ' Leary 

Brian Hajjar 

David Hajjar 

David Lagsden 

Michael Sweeney 

Daniel Sweeney 

Paul Robinson 

Simon Towers 

John Livingston 

Mary Conant, Outreach Worker 

Mary V. Gillis, Park & Recreation Commissioner 

Jack Heller, Park & Recreation Commissioner 

Gay D'Amaro, School Committee 

Thomas LaPlante, Police Department 

The Commission has set a few goals this year; 

1. Helping the Senior Citizens with shoveling, gardening 
etc.; 

2. A Boston Harbor Cruise for students under 21 years of 
age in the Spring; 

3. A dance on Cable T.V. for the Middle School students. 

Gerry O'Leary will be running for a second term in the 
Massachusetts Association of Student Council which will be held 
in Hyannis, MA this year. 

The Commission has a lot of ideas to plan around, and are 
doing an excellent job. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary V. Gillis 

Park and Recreation Commission 

Youth Advisory Commission 



126 



PUBLIC SCHOOL REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1988 



127 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Through the efforts of the administration and teaching staff, the year 
ending December 31, 1988 saw our school system continue to provide a qual- 
ity education to the young people of Medfield. Below are some of the major 
events of the year and some of the areas of concern to the School Commit- 
tee . 

Town elections in March brought a new member to the Committee. Teresa 
Fannin was elected to the position formerly held by Barbara Tupper who de- 
cided not to seek re-election. Mrs. Tupper had been a very valuable member 
of the School Committee for over 10 years, and had served as chairman for 
two years. Her support of education, her experience, and her insight into 
school issues will be missed by the Committee and the Town of Medfield. 

Negotiations with the Medfield Teachers Association occupied the Com- 
mittee for most of the year. Contract talks began in January and were fi- 
nally concluded in October when agreement was reached on a three year con- 
tract. The contract will expire after the 1990-91 school year. 

During the negotiations, both sides recognized that Medfield teacher 
salaries were behind those of many area towns and an attempt was made to 
address this concern. The contract calls for salaries to increase in the 
first year by 7%, in the second year by 6% in the first half and then by 2% 
in the second half, and in the third year by 5% in the first half and 3% in 
the second half. 

The amount of the salary increase will require the School Committee to 
look very closely at the budget for the coming year for areas of savings. 
It is hoped that the townspeople will recognize the need to adequately com- 
pensate our teachers and continue to support the school budget. 

The Medfield Schools underwent a major reorganization in 1985 which 
was expected to last for five years. In 1988 however, due to increases in 
enrollment at the primary level, an adjustment to the reorganization plan 
became necessary. A Reorganization Committee was formed to study the mat- 
ter and after considering several options recommended that kindergarten be 
moved from the Wheelock School to Memorial School thus making more space 
available at Wheelock to house grades one through three. Memorial had been 
closed as a school after the 1985 reorganization and leased to the South 
Norfolk County Association for Retarded Citizens (SNCARC). In September 
1989, a portion of the building will be reclaimed by the school department 
with the remainder continuing to be leased. 

Budgetary considerations continue to present a major challenge to the 
Committee. The school budget must compete with all of the other needs of 
the town for the limited amount of money available, and it has become in- 
creasingly difficult to make ends meet and still provide the educational 
programs that people in Medfield have come to expect. 



128 



Non educational requirements took an unexpectedly large amount of 
money from the budget this year. A leaking underground oil tank at the 
Dale Street School had to be replaced at a cost of over $90,000. Also, at 
the Middle School, replacement of the hot water tank for the building cost 
the school department over $50,000. Expenses such as these are unfortu- 
nately becoming more common which take away from more direct educational 
needs. 



The Committee's plan to add more athletic fields and to upgrade the 
condition of our existing fields has not progressed to the extent hoped for 
due to a lack of funding. In the fall of 1988 however, the Medfield Youth 
Baseball Association generously came forward and funded much needed im- 
provements to all the baseball fields under school jurisdiction. This ges- 
ture was much appreciated by the School Committee and will result in more 
favorable and safer playing conditions for both school and other youth 
teams . 

The success of our educational program is due in no small part to the 
efforts of many volunteers. The School Committee would like to thank all 
of the individuals and groups who have, done so much for the school system. 
Without them our programs would be severely restricted and would not have 
the quality that they now have. Groups such as the School Boosters, the 
Music Boosters, Community School Association, the Coalition for Public 
Education, the Lions Club, the League of Women Voters and many others all 
deserve a vote of thanks from the community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William A. Hajjar, Chairman 
F. Paul Quatromoni 
Robert A. Kinsman 
Gay W. D'Amaro 
Teresa Fannin 



129 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 

OF SCHOOLS 



To the Citizens of Medfield: 



Medfield has a long tradition of providing quality education for its 
children. The year 1988 was no exception to that tradition. The major 
reasons that Medfield is able to provide quality education is because of 
the dedication and professionalism of its administrators and teachers, the 
confidence of the public in providing sufficient funds, and the tremendous 
spirit of cooperation and level of participation of the parents. It is 
only with this type of support that we will be able to continue to maintain 
this tradition of excellence in our schools. 

The education of our young people continues with the revision of ex- 
isting programs and, as appropriate, the addition of new programs (AIDS 
education, etc.). These adjustments are necessary if we are to meet the 
demands of both the present and the future. 

As we review the past year, we note the following: 

ENROLLMENT: 

School began on September 8, 1987 with an enrollment of 1,767 stu- 
dents. This is a decrease of thirty-six (36) students from the previous 
year. Despite the overall decrease in students systemwide the enrollment 
at the elementary level has increased slightly. Long-range enrollment pro- 
jections show a gradual rise to approximately 1,968 students in the year 
1993-1994. 

SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY: 

The team concept at our schools provides unique opportunities for par- 
ents and teachers to maintain close communication regarding the performance 
and behavior of the students. All lines of communication are kept open as 
we constantly strive through team/parent/teacher meetings to keep parents 
informed. 

CURRICULUM MATRIX: 

After almost four years of study, a ten year curriculum review process 
was put in place this year. This will ensure that all curriculum areas un- 
dergo constant review for possible revision. The goal, of course, remains 
the same: To provide rigorous, systematic, up-to-date instruction for the 
students of the Medfield Public Schools. 



130 



ACCREDITATION: 

The Ralph Wheelock and the Dale Street Schools completed their ac- 
creditation process this year with a three day visit from a committee from 
the New England Association of Schools & Colleges. Staff members at the 
Middle School and the High School are currently conducting their 
self-evaluations which will culminate in a visit from an outside evaluation 
group in 1989 (High School) and 1990 (Middle School). The process is te- 
dious and time consuming but offers a rich reward in instructional improve- 
ment. 

LONG-RANGE PLANNING: 

In addition to curriculum (mentioned above) we have completed 
long-range plans for maintenance, field improvements, facilities use and 
personnel. 

CHAPTER 188 EDUCATIONAL REFORM: 

Funding continues in the following areas: 

1. School Improvement Councils: School Improvement Councils received 
funding as follows: 

a) High School $5,870. 

b) Middle School 3,501. 

c) Dale Street 2,711. 

d) Ralph Wheelock 5,551. 

A total of $17,633 was received. 

2. Horace Mann Grants: Grants up to $2,500 maximum are awarded to 
teachers for specific projects. There were thirty (30) awards made this 
year. These awards range from $215.00 to $2,500.00. These grants in- 
cluded work in writing, community service, study skills, science and other 
areas. A total of $15,363.50 was received. 

3. State Testing: Testing and review of test results in both the Ba- 
sic Skills (reading, writing, math) and Assessment Testing (reading, math, 
science, social studies) continues. As in the past we did extremely well 
in all areas. Of particular note was our Grade VI II first place finish in 
the statewide Social Studies Assessment Test. 

4. Early Childhood: As a result of a grant we have created an inte- 
grated (special needs and regular education) pre-school program. This 
class is conducted at the Memorial School. 

RETIREMENT: 

After thirty-one (31) years in Medfield Madelyn Greene retired in June 
1988. Madelyn served as a Grade IV, Grade VI, and as a Middle School En- 
glish teacher. Madelyn was a dedicated, resourceful loving professional who 
possessed great stamina. She continues to exhibit these same qualities in 
retirement. 



131 



RESOLVE: 

We will continue in our determination that all of our students will be 
prepared for the challenges that await them. 



Respectfully submitted, • 

Thomas M. Reis 
Superintendent of Schools 




First day of School 



132 





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141 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



NEW PERSONNEL AND EFFECTIVE DATE 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
♦Cohen, Wendy 
*Steinkeler, Susan 

DALE STREET SCHOOL 
Frost, Dianne 
Mclnerney, Debra 



September 
September 



September 
September 



SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENT AIDE 

Blair, Carol September 

COMPUTER AIDE 

Lynch, Sara September 

CHAPTER I AIDE 

Edgar, Laura October 

GRADE I AIDE 

McConnell, Ellen October 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE CLERK 

Bunker, Susan June 

PUPIL SERVICES 

Frukuska-Heeren, Phyllis September 

*Robinson, Judith September 

*Corcoran, Marie April 

*McMahon, Veronica May 

Allessio, Darlene September 



NIPPLE SCHOOL 

*Kryzanek, Carol September 



WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

Bertram, Barbara September 



LEARNING CENTER AIDE 
Bullock, Kathryn October 
Mullen, Bernice April 



SECRETARIAL 
Davidson, Sandra 
Giessler, Jane 



FOOD SERVICES 
Jennette, Joan 
Jones, Christina 
LaPlante, Laurie 
Marcel, Elizabeth 
Nelson, Carol 
Priante, Marianne 
Rad, Gale 

CUSTODIANS 
Curley , Stephen 
Kelly, John 
King, Dana 
Mendall, Ralph 
Puzas, John 
Smith, Alexander 
Tullock, Stephen 



September 
September 



September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
September 
September 



March 
February 
January 
December 
July 
December 
April 



Nelson, Laura 
Reardon, Joan 
Scobbo, Mary 



LEAVES OF ABSENCE 
Dale Street School 
Wheelock School 
Wheelock School 



September 
September 
September 



♦Part-time Employee 



142 



TERMINATIONS 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 




Block, Robin 


June 


Elis, Janet 


June 


Grayson, Maceon 


June 


Morgan, Byron 


June 


McLaughlin, James 




(Retired) 


Janu 



DALE STREET SCHOOL 



LEARNING CENTER AIDE 

Mullen, Bernice 



FOOD SERVICES 



June 



Davidson, Sandra 


June 


DeVasto, Clara 


June 


Grover, Mildred 




(Retired) 


August 


Howard, Ruth 


May 


Jones, Christina 


June 


Oglesby, Loretta 


May 


Putney, Joan 


August 


SECRETARIAL 




Temming, Kathleen 


June 


Wiley, Kaye 


June 



MIDDLE SCHOOL 




Greene, Madelyn 




(Retired) 


June 


Ivers, Jean 


June 


McElroy, Patricia 


June 


McVicar, Constance 


June 


WHEELOCK SCHOOL 




Kinsey, Marianne 


June 


PUPIL SERVICES 




*Corcoran, Marie 


June 


*McMahon, Veronica 


June 


CUSTODIANS 




Barchiesi, Leo 


April 


Bassett, Elton 


September 


Bourget, Frank 


January 


Kelly, John 


August 


Nesbitt, James 


January 


Tulloch, Stephen 


November 



*Part-time Employee 



143 



REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT 

SUPERINTENDENT FOR 

BUSINESS AFFAIRS 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with continuing pleasure that I submit to you my report for the 
year 1988 for the Business Office. We continue to enjoy the support of an 
excellent staff in the areas of bookkeeping/accounting, food services, 
maintenance/custodial services and transportation. I wish to commend my 
secretary, Kathie Leader, in particular, for her quick, efficient, ex- 
tremely helpful and positive attitude in the operations of the office. 

Our new Director of Buildings and Grounds, John Puzas, joined us in 
July. He has contributed to the maintenance and custodial services enjoyed 
by our staff and students. We all enjoy well-kept and pleasant surround- 
ings thanks to John and his staff - every one of whom I have enjoyed work- 
ing with. 

We have concentrated this year on energy conservation. The project of 
changing outside security lights around all buildings has been completed, 
and through a rebate which was returned to the Town and lower energy costs, 
we have already begun to realize savings. Boston Edison's program to re- 
duce consumption of electricity enabled us to change all lights in the Dale 
Street School and the Middle School to low wattage ballasts and fluorescent 
lights, which will continue to reduce electric consumption. During the 
summer months, we concentrated on the annual intensive cleaning and recon- 
ditioning of the buildings and on our care of 48 acres of fields and 
grounds. While our fields will require extensive work soon, this project 
is in the works and should the Town see fit to appropriate certain monies 
requested in the 1989-1990 budget, we should be able to achieve the first 
project in the upgrading of playing fields by developing new fields behind 
the high school in order to begin rotating use of existing fields, and al- 
lowing necessary resting between their years of use. We are presently 
working on several major projects: putting new windows on the older part 
of the Dale Street School (built in the early 1940's); connecting the Ralph 
Wheelock School to Town sewage; major repair to the chimney of the Middle 
School and providing necessary alterations for the re-occupation of Memo- 
rial School. 



144 



Food Services experienced major personnel changes resulting from re- 
tirements and resignations, and we began the school year in September 1988 
with some personnel needs. These have been filled and in general, our food 
services remain at a high level. Participation in the lunch program is 
high; and some of the changes made at the High School at the request and 
suggestion of the staff and students have increased the variety, efficiency 
and participation at that school. We will continue to try to maintain this 
high quality in the face of continuing reduction in reimbursements and the 
availability of federal commodity items. 

Regarding transportation, we have maintained the safe transport of 
over 1600 students, making approximately 100 bus runs each day. We have 
also continued our efforts to cite vehicles passing stopped school buses in 
the Town of Medfield and have enjoyed the cooperation of the Massachusetts 
Registry of Motor Vehicles in this regard. Their response to our letters 
reporting incidents has been excellent. Our bus routes are getting longer 
and the need for four double runs at the secondary level has continued this 
year. There is every indication that double runs may have to be increased 
in the near future. Wheelock has also increased in numbers and in bus re- 
quirements; however, we are expecting the elementary bus runs to level out 
somewhat with the movement of the Kindergarten to Memorial School in Sep- 
tember of 1989, when their schedule will coincide with the Dale Street 
School. We presented a program of "Assertive Discipline" for all bus driv- 
ers^, which was well received; and we certainly congratulate our drivers for 
their knowledge of the Town, for their efforts toward safety, and their 
continued high concern for children. When your children board our school 
buses, you may be sure they are being well cared for by excellent people. 

Our budget for the fiscal year 1988-89 was passed at the extremely low 
increase of 2.7% - far below communities comparing with Medfield. This low 
percentage brought the average increase of our school budgets for the past 
five years to a low of 4.8% per year. It should be obvious that the levels 
of service which the people of Medfield expect of us cannot be maintained 
at this level - which is BELOW the level of normal inflation for the pe- 
riod! We still feel the strong support of our citizens toward education, 
and count on that support. 

It was my pleasure in November of 1988 to participate in a Forum on 
Town Finance which was sponsored by the Coalition for Medfield Public 
Education which made some kind of history; for the first time in my memory, 
the Coalition brought together Town administrators, Warrant Committee mem- 
bers, Capital Outlay Committee members, the School Committee, Superinten- 
dent and Assistant Superintendent of Schools in an open forum to present to 
the general public the problems we are facing in finance. It is my per- 
sonal hope that this sort of forum continue into the future. 

In purchasing, we have initiated the first of a system of quotation 
requests for office supplies, art supplies, computer supplies, physical 
education/athletic supplies and custodial supplies which hopefully will get 
the best price for the best materials available. 

One of the most rewarding projects with which I have been associated 
in the past year has been the training of our school secretarial staffs in 
the use of computers in the school offices. We have been dedicating 
in-service days for this staff to further their training in Smart Inte- 
grated Software, which we are using for data management and accounting, as 



145 



well as word processing. There is a great deal to do before we will reach 
the possibilities offered by this system; but the enthusiasm of the secre- 
taries, and their dedication, have made this a pleasure for me. 

A missing ingredient in the conduct of the Business Office has been 
the lack of input from our public - the staff, students and parents of the 
community. Although we are responsible for those areas which determine the 
well-being of all, mine is the only administrative position for which an 
advisory council is not required. In order to benefit from first-hand in- 
put from this public, I have been establishing in each school a council 
composed of parents and staff and in the upper schools, of students as 
well. We have begun to meet and establish our guidelines and the impact of 
these meetings has already been felt. I look forward to talking with these 
people who will help me bring a different point of observation to my job. 

In closing, this is my 28th year in the Medfield Schools. In all that 
time, I have sympathized with my colleagues in education who do not live in 
Medfield and who are not fortunate enough to work in schools like Medfield. 
They have been fulfilling years; sometimes frustrating, sometimes uplift- 
ing, sometimes difficult; but never boring and never lacking in both pro- 
fessional and public support. There are few in Massachusetts today who can 
make that observation about the schools in which they work and I wish to 
thank my educational colleagues and the public in Medfield who have made 
this possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Daniel E. Hogan 

Assistant Superintendent for 

Business Affairs 

REPORT OF THE AMOS CLARK 
KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of Medfield High School, I respectfully submit our Annual 
Report for the school year ending December 31, 1988. 

The official enrollment of the High School for the 1988-8S school year 
is 479. There were 175 students who graduated in the Class of 1988. Of 
these, 77.1% went on to a four-year college; 15.5% to a two-year college; 
3.4% attended a non-college educational institution; .6% enlisted in the 
Armed Services and 3.4% entered the world of work. 

The year was marked by outstanding academic achievement on the part of 
many students. Among it's graduates 16% of the Class of 1988 were members 
of the National Honor Society. Heather Daniels and Michelle Couture were 
the class' Valedictorian and Salutatorian, respectively. Several students 
were honored for Academic Excellence by the National Merit Scholarship Cor- 
poration, including Matthew Berg who was identified as a semifinalist and 
ten student scholars who received letters of commendation from this presti- 
gious scholarship program. 



146 



Over 97% of our graduating seniors took the College Board Examina- 
tions. Our SAT and Achievement scores are well above the state and local 
averages. We are pleased to announce that their verbal mean score was 480 
and their math mean score was 513. Thirteen students participated in the 
Advanced Placement Examination Program in Chemistry, Physics and Calculus 
and it should be noted that all were certified. 

Our senior graduates scored extremely well in the statewide assessment 
test. In most all categories their scores were higher than those of stu- 
dents who attend high schools in communities similar to Medfield. 

Medfield High School students not only excelled in the classroom, but 
also in the areas of extracurricular activities. Sixty-four percent of the 
student body participated in our interscholastic athletic programs. Many 
students became involved in such activities as the Harvard Model Congress, 
the Academic Decathlon, our Peer Leadership and Peer Education Programs, 
Boys and Girls State, our S.A.D.D. Program, as well as many other clubs and 
organizations which are available to them. Over 500 student athletes and 
their parents attended our annual, "Warriors' Call to Excellence" evening, 
a program focusing upon decision-making, as well as drug and alcohol aware- 
ness which was sponsored by our health and athletic departments. 

The High School administration introduced for the first time an 
orientation/transition session for Grade 8 parents. The program was well 
attended and well received by the community. 

Our newly established Senior Citizens at Medfield High School Program 
has been highly successful. Several citizens have volunteered their ser- 
vices as student tutors, aides and guest speakers. Our students in turn 
have offered our senior citizens transportation to our school whenever 
needed. Our school chorus performed for the Senior Citizens Club prior to 
the holidays. Many senior citizens have requested and received complimen- 
tary passes to all of our school activities which we have made available to 
them. 

During this past year, our faculty has been diligently working on our 

"School Self-Study." This process precedes the formal evaluation of 

Medfield High School which will be conducted in the fall of 1989 by the New 
England Association of Schools and Colleges. 

Commissioner Harold Raynolds of the State Department of Education sent 
a letter of congratulations to Medfield High School for having been chosen 
as one of the Massachusetts nominees for the 1988-89 United States Second- 
ary School Recognition Program. In his letter he stated that, "Your school 
is a worthy representative of the high caliber of Massachusetts schools and 
will be a strong candidate for national recognition." Medfield High School 
was one of six in Massachusetts that received this honor. All nominations 
have been forwarded to a national review panel in Washington, D.C. This 
panel will select those schools who are to be nationally recognized. 

Many of our students were honored during this past year by receiving 
recognition for outstanding performance in both academics and athletics. 



147 



I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Medfield School 
Committee, the Superintendent of Schools, the Assistant Superintendent and 
the many parents and community groups for their continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Tassos P. Filledes 
Principal 




High School Art Display 



148 



GRADUATION EXERCISES OF 

MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 

CLASS OF 1988 



PROGRAM 



PROCESSIONAL 

"Pomp and Circumstance" - Elgar 



INVOCATION 

THE NATIONAL ANTHEM 

WELCOME 

MESSAGE TO GRADUATING CLASS 

HONOR ESSAYS 

PRESENTATION OF CLASS GIFT 



Class of 1988 

Medfield High School Concert Band 

Douglas Godfrey, Director 

The Rev. Dr. Robert L. Wood 

Medfield High School Concert Band 

Joshua R. Peck 
President, Class of 1988 

Thomas M. Reis 
Superintendent of Schools 

Heather Daniels, Valedictorian 
Michelle Couture, Salutatorian 

Christopher R. Swezey 
Vice President, Class of 1988 



PRESENTATION TO FOREIGN EXCHANGE STUDENTS 



A.F.S. Students 



MESSAGE TO THE CLASS OF 1988 



Ann Thompson 
Chairman, Board of Selectmen 

Hugo E. Adorno, Paraguay 

Florence M. Glatigny, France 

Johanna Kappers, Sweden 



William A. Hajjar 
Chairman, Medfield School Committee 



PRESENTATION OF AWARDS 

Honor Awards 

Academic Decathlon Gold Medal Award 

D.A.R. Certificate 



Tassos P. Filiedes, Principal 



Presentation of Appointment to Naval Academy 



Paul W. Needham 
Lt. Cmdr., Ret. 



Friends of Medfield Library Amy Fiske Memorial Award Pam Kell 
Medfield School Boosters School Spirit Awards Kaye Wiley 

Medfield Teachers Association Awards Richard Shapiro 

American Legion Medals Walter Reynolds 

Bob Porack Memorial Award Robert Lester Porack 



149 



Medfield High School Drama Club Award Mary Ann Wilson 

Robert Belmont Track and Field Team Spirit Awards Steve Astle 



Student Council Awards 
Medfield Music Boosters Award 



Gordon Hodne 

John A. Moretti 
Assistant Principal 



PRESENTATION OF SCHOLARSHIPS 

Amy Fiske American Field Service Scholarships Kathy & Richard Fiske 
Commonwealth Scholarships 



Trinity College Scholarship 
Quinnipiac College Scholarship 
Macfarlane Scholarship 

Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship 
Notre Dame Scholar 

Colorado State Scholarship 
Hartwick College Scholarship 

Page Realty Scholarship 

In memory of Angelo Contieri 
South Shore Bank "Our Best To You" Scholarship 

National Honor Society Scholarships/Awards 

Hannah Adams Woman's Club Scholarships 

Medfield Lions Club Scholarships 

Ciba Corning Diagnostics Scholarships 

Medfield Police Association Scholarship 

Medfield Women's Association Scholarship 

Robert Luke Memorial Scholarship 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 Scholarships 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 Scholarship 
In memory of Ed Duhamel 



William A. Hajjar 
Chairman, Medfield School Committee 

F. Paul Quatromoni 
Medfield School Committee 



Robert Kinsman 
Medfield School Committee 

Gay D'Amaro 
Medfield School Committee 

Teresa Fannin 
Medfield School Committee 



Richard Shapiro 

Kay Risler 

Jerry Doucette 

William C. Goodall 

Robert Naughton 

Ellen Byda 

Richard DeSorgher 

Walter Reynolds 

Dave Nowers 



American Legion Aux., Beckwith Post No. 110 Scholarship John Moretti 

Assistant Principal 



Medfield Employers & Merchants Org. Scholarship 



Michael Medina 



150 



CLASS OF 1988 



James Michael Ahern 
Paul Brian Alberta 
Robert Dean Anderson, Jr. 
Cara Jane Andrews 

*#Scott Christian Andrews 

♦•Frederick Scott Aronstein 

*»John-Bradley Baker 
Suzanne Wood Baldwin 
*Andrea Lynne Bennotti 
Matthew Breeden Berg 
Ir.grid Berger 
Brian Christopher Berry 
Coberly Kingsley Birch 
Patrick Aaron Bledsoe 
Kristen Lyn Bonn 
Julie Jennifer Bonnet 
Alfred John Bonoldi, Jr. 

♦•Jennifer Lynn Breen . 
Lauren Marie Brown 

*»David Rogers Bucci 

Kimberly Jeanne Burchard 
Exzavain Vante Burkes 
Frederick Byda, Jr. 
Kimberly Ann Cafferelli 
Claire Gabrielle Camp 
Pamela Sue Carey 
Karen Marie Carmichael 
Lori Ann Carvalho 
Michael Anthony Centore 
Mark Alan Chag 
Robert Henry Chase II 
Lisa Ann Chin 
Nina Joy Ciatto 
Andrew Thomas Clarke 
David John Coffin 
Amy Elizabeth Colby 
Michelle-Lee Comeau 
Patrick Joseph Commane 
Carolyn Lee Connors 

♦•Michelle Lynne Couture 
Brian William Cox 
Christina Winslow Currie 
Craig Michael D'Ambrosia 

♦•Heather Denise Daniels 
Denise C. Dauphinee 
Melissa Ann Deal 

♦•Karen Delio 

Timothy William Demos 
Todd Desrosiers 
•Susan Kristine Develin 
James E. Dewar 



Eric John Doucette 

Ellen Louise Duffy 

Elizabeth Ann Dugan 

Pamela Eileen DuRoss 

Amy Margaret Edgar 

Athena Exarhopoulos 

Colin B. Finn 

Erich John Fleming 

William Paul Ford III 

David Joseph Foulsham, Jr. 

Erik David Fuglestad 
♦Barton James Garrison 

Jonathan Daniel Gatti 
♦•Allessandro Alfred Girolamo, Jr 

Barbara Lynne Goodall 

Carolyn Doranne Gorham 

Laura Lee Govoni 

Tara Marie Graney 

Rachel Davis Hall 

Hope Hallowell 

Robert Joseph Henry 

Kristine Hibbert 

Kerri Lee Hoffman 

Susanne Ross Horgan 
•Jacqueline Hoyt 

David Christopher Hyland 

Kristine Lee Janovitz 

Wendy Aris Johnson 

Adam Katz 

Erin Elizebeth Keefe 

Justin James Kern 

Darrell Roy Kerr 
•Robert Patrick Kinsman 
•Peter Johnston Kozel 

Matthew Jennings Klickstein 

Kimberly Ann Kosc 

Patricia Joan Lee 

Mark Jay Legere 

Jeffrey Richard Lewis 

Patricia Anita Lorantos 

Christopher Robert Lupfer 

Sarah Ann MacDonald 
♦•Stephen Grant MacDonald 

Christopher John MacKay 

Shannon Maura MacKinnon 
•John Joseph Mackintosh 

Jeffrey Alan Maloney 

Michael Charles Mandei 

Kristen E;len Martin 

Sean Robert Mauczak 

Elizabeth Ann Mattaboni 



151 



Robert John Donovan 

Sean Bancroft McGuire 

Christa Maria McKechnie 

Marcell Rene McPherson-Wood 

Keith Alexander Meeker 

John Bacon Mentzer 

Wayne Tracy Mitchell 

Caroline Elizabeth Monroe 

Stephanie Sinclair Moss 

Brian Gregory Murphy 

Jane Ellen Murphy 

Robin Lynn Murray 

Inga Marie Neirinckx 
*#Steven Edward Nichols 

Mark Charles Nickerson 

Kyle David Nolan 

Paul Samuel Noonan 

Michael William Nossal 
•Colleen Lisa O'Brien 

Arlene Mary 0' Donovan 

Christopher Donald Orpen 

Michael David Osowski 

Ann Mary Palacio 

John Panciocco 

Annamaria Alexis Papadoyiannis 

Timothy Hume Parker 

Hadley Passela 

Joshua Richards Peck 

Michele Gerard Placido 

Wendy Diane Power 

Julianne Marie Powers 

Carolyn Anne Reilly 

Thomas E. Rezza III 
♦•Michael Ronald Ricard 

Dana Erik Ripley 

Jason Roberts 



Kimberly Jeanne Maurer 
Elizabeth Rose Rogan 

•Patricia Ann Russell 
♦•Melissa Ann Schmidt 
*#Kathryn Louise Schwartz 

•Laurie Elizabeth Sheldon 
Priscilla Beth Simonsen 

•Karen Beth Sipas 

•Justine Gibson Smith 
Laura Renee Stowe 
Kimberly Dawn Sugrue 
Kathleen Marie Sullivan 
Michael Anthony Sullivan 
David Eugene Sutton 
Jennifer Elizabeth Swanson 
Christopher Reeves Swezey 
Craig Cory Sylvia 
Otto David Szebeni 
Toril Christin Tangen 
* Matthew David Taylor 
Elizabeth Emily Temple 
Derek David Theriault 
Michael David Thibault 
John Leonard Trebino 
James Tubridy 

•Barbara Lynn Tupper 
Karin Theresa Urban 
Kenneth Patrick Viera 
Darin Lawrence Walsh 
Aaron Wesley Wertheim 
Lisa Valerie Wheian 
Amy Elizabeth Whyte 
Brian Robert Wiley 
*#Brian Gary Williams 
Dale R. Williams 
Stacey Kristine Yakel 
Judith Louise Yates 



MARSHALLS 

Jennifer Artiss Kirsten Thomson 

*Upper 10% of the graduating class academically 
•National Honor Society 



152 



*PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS 

William Hajjar, Chairman, Medfield School Committee 
Thomas Reis, Superintendent of Schools 
Tassos P. Filledes, Principal 



BENEDICTION 
RECESSIONAL 

"Consecration of the House" — Beethoven 



The Rev. Alice B. Lane 

The Class of 1988 

Medfield High School 
Concert Band 



******** 




A.F.S. Students on Graduation Day 



153 



REPORT OF THE MEDFIELD 
MIDDLE SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is my pleasure to submit the Medfield Middle School's report for 
the year ending December 31, 1988. 

A completely new schedule was developed in which there is common plan- 
ning time for all teams. This is a great improvement and should provide 
time for more program and skill development. 

Trimester Report Cards: A faculty committee recommended this new ap- 
proach to grade reporting. It gives the teacher more time to evaluate stu- 
dent progress especially at the beginning of the year. As part of the 
plan, progress reports will be issued to all students at the midpoint in 
each term. 

In April, M.L. Carr, former Celtic player, visited the School to 
present his program entitled, M.L. Carr Challenge. This event was the cul- 
minating event of a substance abuse awareness week. Each department dis- 
cussed substance abuse within their classes. Banners were designed with 
"Say No" slogans and the entire school participated in a substance abuse 
game created by Mr. Joseph Farroba and Ms. Loretta Fahey. 

The Electronic Bookshelf Reading Program has been very successful. 
Started last spring, there are approximately 140 students participating. 
The materials available are also being extended by eighth grade students 
who are reading and authoring computer test questions for other students 
using books in the library's fiction collection. 

Mrs. Linda Lola has used the cable television studio for book report 
projects and her programs have been aired over the local station. 

The eighth grade social studies scores on the State Assessment Test 
were the highest in the state. The new curriculum that Mr. DeSorgher, Mr. 
McHugh and Mr. Farnham have worked on has paid dividends. Congratulations 
to students and staff! 

The eighth graders were asked to write research papers on prominent 
Medfield residents who lived during the 1600-1800's and to construct a 
model of the house they lived in. Research skills were developed by using 
the Medfield Historical Society, birth, death, marriage and assessor 
records in the Town Hall, by performing grave rubbings, and by interviewing 
scores of Medfield residents. Projects were put on display for parents and 
townspeople to view at an open house. 

Eighth graders also traveled to Thompson Island and participated on 
the low ropes course and in the environmental science program. Goals were 
to examine group dynamics and to strive toward better peer relationships 
and attitudes. 

The study skills program began its second year with the use of a 
learning styles inventory computer program by each sixth grade student to 



154 



develop metacognition. A pretest post-test was developed and implemented 
showing significant improvement and support for the program. 

Mrs. Ceri Eagling of the Medfield Coalition for Public Education de- 
veloped a resource file for speakers and academic enrichment. 

The activity period was established before school on Thursday morn- 
ings. Fourteen different activities were offered. This exploratory period 
is the heart of the middle school concept. Positive relationships between 
teachers and students are built during programs like this one. 

Our school entered the Odyssey of the Mind contest and in our first 
year won honors and state recognition. The Straddle Structure Problem was 
coached by Mr. Robert Ammon and participants were Andrew Harris, Andrew 
Gottlieb, Michael Keating, Justin Kelcourse and Mark Andrews. These stu- 
dents placed first in Division II and went on to the world finals where 
they placed 28th out of 56 teams. The world finals were held at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Represented were 40 states and 3 foreign 
countries—China, Canada and Mexico. 

The Showtime Team was coached by Mrs. Linda Lola and Mrs. Kathy Ford. 

This team won the Ranatra Fusca Award for teamwork and creativity. Team 

members were Robert Arena, Erin Ford, Amy Danielson, Michelle Maguire and 
Erica Hunt. 

At our first eighth grade graduation, Karen Guilmette won the new 
Madelyn Greene Award, The Medfield Historical Society Award in memory of 
Blanche Kingsbury was won by Terrence Ryan. 

The C.S.A. continued to be so very supportive of our School. They 
sponsored the Acting Troupe and the Odyssey of the Mind Program. Mrs. 
Ingrid Terrenzi developed a parent volunteer list for the teams' use. 

Fundraisers that consumed countless hours were organized and run by 
parents to offset costs involved in the four-day Washington, 
D.C. -Williamsburg trip on the bicentennial of the U.S. Constitution. 

A new mural was begun that will take a year to finish. Located in the 
cafeteria, the "wall quilt" will give all students a "piece of the school" 
during their three-year stay. Mrs. M. Susan Horgan and Mr. Martin Therrien 
have devoted countless hours in the development of what will be a truly 
beautiful display. 

The future plans of the Middle School include the investigation of en- 
richment programs and homeroom guidance programs. Also we hope to expand 
our computer education program. 



155 



In closing, I want to thank the Superintendent, his capable staff and 
ray colleagues for their support and encouragement. I commend the teachers 
who every day make programs work. Also, I want to express my sincere ap- 
preciation for the custodial and secretarial staff that make a difference 
in the atmosphere each and everyday. They are essential ingredients in a 
good school. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert H. white 
Principal 

REPORT OF THE DALE STREET SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal this will be my twentieth annual report and the fourth 
for Dale Street School for grades four and five for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1988. The school year opened with 302 students; 149 in grade four 
and 153 in grade five. 

The staff at the Dale Street School compiled a thorough self study for 
the accreditation process. The on-site evaluation by the Visiting Commit- 
tee resulted in a beneficial professional interaction for all who par- 
ticipated. The support of the Central Administration, School Committee, 
Community School Association, Parents and Secretarial, Cafeteria and Custo- 
dial personnel was instrumental in contributing to the success of this ex- 
perience. 

To arrive at a recommendation pertaining to accreditation, the report 
of the Visiting Committee will be reviewed by the Committee on Public El- 
ementary Schools. Final action on accreditation will be the responsibility 
of the Executive Committee of the New England Association of Schools and 
Colleges. This decision will occur prior to the end of this school year. 

We felt that the self-study was important not only to review and 
analyze our current programs but also to make further educational changes 
that will strengthen the total school situation. 

The adoption of new programs in Social Studies, English, Spelling and 

Handwriting have greatly enhanced and enriched the students' experiences. 

Purchasing of updated Math textbooks and materials provided a continuity of 
skills from primary to intermediate grades. 

The After-School Program continues to provide a variety of offerings 
such as basketball, computers, drama, journalism, photography, whiffle and 
paddle ball games, arts and crafts and a talent show. Approximately fifty 
percent of the student population participated. Under the leadership of 
Miriam Baldwin, grade five teacher, this program gives students opportuni- 
ties to select an area of interest in a relaxed and pleasant environment. 



156 



The "What's It Like Program, " conducted by Linda Dunn and Wendy 
Sullivan, for fourth graders was geared towards making the students aware 
of, and more sensitive to, people who have disabilities. The major focus 
was to develop within the student an awareness and acceptance of the dif- 
ferences, while at the same time emphasizing the sameness of feelings we 
all share. In classroom simulations, the children had an opportunity to 
experience how it feels to be disabled. 

Kindergarten classes were being planned for implementation at the Me- 
morial School. Registration, pre-school screening, parents information 
night and administrative and teachers' meetings were scheduled so that a 
smooth and efficient opening will occur in September. 

Communication continues to be a major goal. Newsletters, parent con- 
ferences, progress reports, discussion meetings, orientation meetings 
(grade 3) provided a channel for dialogue between school and home. 

The teaching staff is to be commended for their loyalty and dedication 
in meeting the needs of the students. Their response to the accreditation 
process, to administrative direction and to the daily demands of the school 
situation demonstrated a commitment to having a quality school. 

Recognition is to be given to the Community School Association for 
their total involvement in sponsoring and supporting school programs. 

The Central Administration and School Committee have ' given us the 
leadership and guidance in giving students a meaningful education. 

The total operation of the school could not have been efficient with- 
out the support of the secretaries, cafeteria, custodial and bus personnel. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank J. Hoffman 
Principal 

REPORT OF THE RALPH 
WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with great pleasure that I report to you regarding the educa- 
tional program and co-curricular activities of the Ralph Wheelock School 
for the year ending December 31, 1988. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

The change in policy relative to entrance age for Kindergarten requir- 
ing that children be five years old on or before August 31, resulted in 
fewer registrations than had been recorded for the previous year. In re- 
sponse to this slight decline, we reduced the number of sections of Kinder- 
garten from eight to seven. Enrollments recorded as of October 1, 1988, 
for grades one, two and three remained consistent with projections and 



157 



resulted in the assignment of eight classroom sections at the first grade 
level, seven at the second grade level and six at the third grade level. 

Due to the combined efforts of a highly dedicated staff, the Ralph 
Wheelock School has been successful in addressing the intellectual, 
physical and social needs of the pupils enrolled. 

SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY 

In October of 1988 the New England Association of Schools and Col- 
leges, the oldest of six regional accrediting agencies in the United 
States, assigned a visiting committee of professional educators to validate 
the self-study completed by the school staff and members of the Medfield 
community. This group of professionals carefully reviewed this study, con- 
ducted from January 1987 through September 1988 and worked on the following 
objectives : 

-To determine to what degree the school's offerings are being carried 
out in relation to its statement of philosophy and objectives. 

-To determine how the school relates to the nine standards of member- 
ship. 

-To prepare commendations and recommendations for a report designed to 
stimulate school improvement. 

The chairperson of the visiting committee is currently preparing a fi- 
nal report based upon the data collected during the entire self-study and 
on-site visitation process. In their preliminary remarks the visiting team 
has noted the positive relationship that exists between the children, 
staff, parents and community at large and have indicated that they "found 
the Ralph Wheelock School to be a superior school." 

A record number of parents, more than the two hundred and fifty volun- 
teers that served the school during the previous school year, volunteered 
their services in an effort to maximize educational opportunities for our 
children. 

Our parents also participated in special awareness programs dealing 
with preventative strategies for substance abuse. A large number of par- 
ents participated in training seminars designed to introduce curriculum ma- 
terials developed to sensitize children to disabilities of all types. The 
Medfield community, and particularly the Community School Association of 
the Ralph Wheelock School, has continued to provide the school with tremen- 
dous support in all of its activities and special programs. 

Representatives from all segments of our community assisted with main- 
taining the school Victory Garden. This garden provided nearly 2,000 
pounds of fresh produce which was distributed to Medfield senior citizens, 
as well as shelters for the homeless in the metropolitan Boston area. 
Children, parents and grandparents continued to work side by side in an ef- 
fort to demonstrate positive social action and civic responsibility. Pa- 
triotism was also cultivated by providing our pupils with opportunities to 
participate in food drives, clothing drives and food preparation projects. 

The Parent Advisory Council met on a consistent basis and provided 
feedback relative to the school curriculum, instructional materials, school 
services and support programs. The financial contributions of CSA 



158 



supplemented Chapter 188 funding to allow for the continuation of two spe- 
cial projects, the Mathematics Lab and Project Extend. The Math Lab pro- 
vided our students with hands-on experiences designed to review and extend 
classroom experiences. Project Extend provided over two hundred of our 
children with after school enrichment programs including problem solving, 
book making, puppetry, creative writing, art exploration and scientific ex- 
perimentation. 

Parents demonstrated their eagerness to participate in school related 
activities by joining their children for Open House, Classroom Visitation 
Days, Flag Day, Winter and Spring Music Festivals, parent Lunch Days and 
the many special experiences scheduled by the school. Parent-teacher con- 
ferences, as well as parent in-service programs, were offered to enable 
parents to become more familiar with the academic program at the primary 
level. 

The spring School Fair brought over two thousand residents to the 
school to enjoy a special day to celebrate childhood. This event proved to 
be one of the largest and most successful events held in the community dur- 
ing the year. 

CURRICULUM 

New curriculum materials were evaluated and resulted in systemwide 
adoptions by the School Committee. These new instructional materials have 
been introduced into the language arts curriculum, specifically for the 
teaching of English and spelling. These texts were selected to compliment 
the reading and handwriting materials introduced during the previous 
academic year. 

In an effort to provide our students with opportunities to develop an 
interest in quality literature while strengthening skills in all areas of 
the reading process, we have increased the use of trade books. Formal in- 
struction in reading has been supplemented with group reading of full 
length selections. The use of manipulatives in the teaching of mathematics 
concepts has also been emphasized. A criterion based testing program has 
been implemented that allows for the immediate diagnosis of math deficien- 
cies so that remediation can be provided immediately. 

The superior results our children achieved in State Basic Skills Test- 
ing Program once again indicated that the programs and practices in place 
have provided our students with strong skills in reading, mathematics and 
writing. 

Cultural experiences in dance, music and American Folklore continued 
to be provided for our students. These experiences were carefully inte- 
grated into all aspects of the curriculum. In addition to these programs, 
many special events were planned that featured our children, staff and lo- 
cal artisans. Individual differences, strength and talents were recognized 
through the following events: the Wheelock Primary Art Festival, Field 
Day, Hobby and Craft Night, Talent Show, Turn About Day, "What's It Like" 
programming and book discussion groups. 



159 




Balloon Day at the Elementary School 




Roseanne Gross explains humidity to students 



160 



With the continued support of the Medfield Girl Scout Council our 
third graders once again participated in a Thanksgiving Environmental 
Project in which an authentic Thanksgiving Feast was prepared in a natural 

setting. 

SUMMARY 

We continue to be aware of the need to assess our methods, curriculum 
and materials in order to provide our children with an education that will 
sustain them as they approach the next century. We at the Ralph Wheelock 
School take seriously our responsibility to develop strong, responsible and 
ethical citizens and feel that this goal can best be achieved when all mem- 
bers of the community make a commitment to high standards for our students, 
schools and local government. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard M. Fitzpatrick 
Principal 

REPORT OF THE PUPIL 
SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with pleasure that I submit my tenth department report. The 
year ending on December 31, 1988 was both eventful and fulfilling. 

SPSCIfo EDUCATION 

Our census appears to be slightly higher than last year's. 

s tud e nts P ect I , 1 937 D ec, l , l? v g 

Ages 3-5 13 17 

Ages 6-17 213 208 

Ages 18-21 _3 J±_ 

Totals 229 236 

The continuing high costs for tuitions and transportation provide the 
impetus for us to program special needs students in Medfield whenever and 
wherever possible. Obviously, we are not willing to sacrifice quality 
since regulations require us to educate these youngsters to their "maximum 
feasible potential." Consequently, we have developed a substantially 
separate full-day program (502.4) at Wheelock School and an integrated 
pre-school program at Memorial School. However, some of our youngsters 
have low incidence disabilities which require placements outside our com- 
munity and we continue to supervise their programs and educational plans. 



161 



PeC, ;. 1997 Dec. 1. 1988 

HECS 4 3 

Vheelock 502.4 - 7 

Other Public Day 15 11 

Private Day 2 

Residential _p_ _2 

TOTALS 19 25 

These figures give evidence to the fact that we have a growing number 
of students with moderate to severe disabilities. 

Residents interested in becoming members of the Parent Advisory Coun- 
cil should call the Director's office for information. 



GUIDANCE 

Individual and small group counseling continues throughout the system. 
Emphasis in group counseling is based on student/curriculum need. 

The Guidance Information System (G.I.S.) continues to be available for 
use by high school students, parents and Medfield residents. Those not at- 
tending our schools who are interested in using the computer should call 
the high school guidance office to schedule an appointment. 

Evening and during school day, parenting groups (S.T.E.P.) have been 
conducted successfully by school psychologists. 

HEALTH SERVICES 

Our four nurses continue to focus their attention on services, educa- 
tion and keeping a healthy school environment. 

With the assistance of the Lions Club, Dr. Galeucia and Dr. Meagher, 
as well as the volunteer efforts of our school nurses, 121 pre-kindergarten 
youngsters participated in the annual vision and hearing clinic last March. 
During the fall, a similar screening was conducted in each of our schools. 
Once again, we are most appreciative for the assistance of trained volun- 
teer parents who assisted our nurses with the school screenings. 

The Impedance Analyzer continues to be an invaluable tool in detecting 
middle ear problems common to young children. Physicians have verified the 
accuracy of this device after receipt of our referrals. 

Postural screening in Grades 5, 6, 8 and 9 took place last spring. 
573 students were screened, 18 children were referred to their physicians 
with physical abnormalities noted in 4 cases and continued follow-up recom- 
mended in an additional 8 cases. 

PRE-SCHOOL 

The Early Childhood Advisory Council recommended the development of an 
integrated pre-school program. This half-day program opened its doors to 
fifteen normally developed youngsters and two special needs children in 



162 



September at Memorial School. Non-special needs three and four year olds 
were selected by lottery. Parents of participants, as well as the little 
ones, love the program. We hope to be able to expand the enrollment in 
September 1989. 

It should be noted that this program is supported entirely through 
grant monies and monthly tuition fees. 

Over fifty residents participated in four evening seminars conducted 
last spring. The focus of these presentations was early childhood develop- 
ment. Presentations were made by Mrs. Kathy Brodeur, Mrs. Terrie Sull, 
Mrs. Carol Amato and Mrs. Dawn Sockol. We are planning to present another 
similar series in the spring. 

PERSONNEL 

Mrs. Rene Rosenfeld returned from a childrearing leave to accept a 
part-time speech and language clinician position in Grades 6-12. 

Mrs. Jayne Berry, occupational therapist, is under contract to provide 
services for our youngsters in need of such assistance. 

Mrs. Phyllis Frukuska-Heeren, Teacher of Young Children with Special 
Needs, was hired largely through grant funds to teach our new integrated 
pre-school program (MECS) at Memorial School. Her aide, Ms. Darlene 
Allessio, has a degree in Early Childhood Education. Her -half-time posi- 
tion is funded through an additional grant fund. 

Mrs. Judith Robinson, a Medfield resident, is currently teaching 
part-time in the Wheelock learning center as a certified learning special- 
ist. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lois E. Lambert 

Director of Pupil Services 



REPORT OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my fourth Annual Report as the Medfield Public 
Schools' Director of Athletics for the year ending December 31, 1988. Our 
interscholastic athletic programs at both the high school and middle 
school provide a positive, competitive atmosphere in which to learn and ex- 
perience. We strive to continually provide a forum where not only ath- 
letic skills are being taught but also those skills necessary for a suc- 
cessful adult life: achievement, commitment, compassion, organization, 
self-control and self-respect. It is my pleasure to report that 64% of our 
entire student body participated in athletics during the past year. This 
statistic is one of which we should all be very proud. 



163 



Boys and girls interscholastic teams were offered at 
past year. Following is the athletic coaching staff 



Basketball (boys) 

Basketball (girls) 

Cheering 

Ice Hockey 

Indoor Track (boys) 

Indoor Track (girls) 



Cheering 
Cross Country 
Field Hockey 



WINTER 

varsity 

Junior Varsity 
Freshman 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



SPRING; 



Varsity 

Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



all levels during this 
by season: 



Jonathan Kirby 
Kenneth Brackett 
William Pope 

Thomas Cowell 
Susan Cowell 
Loretta Fahey 

Susan Medina 

Paul Hogan 

Jeffrey Denman 

Michael Slason 



Baseball 


Varsity 




Richard Nickerso 




Junior Varsi 


ty 


Lynda Bannon 




Freshman 




William Sullivan 


Softball 


Varsity 




Suzanne Moulton 




Junior Varsity 


Judith Noble 




Freshman 




Dick Savastano 


Tennis (boys) 






Richard Connolly 


Tennis (girls) 






Judith Coppola 


Track & Field (boys) 






Todd Miller 


Track & Field (girls) 






Michael Slason 


Track & Field (assistant) 






Neil DuRoss 


Track & Field - 


Head 




Robert Amon 


Middle School 










Assistant 




William Young 




FALL 







Susan Medina 

Michael Kraemer 

Loretta Fahey 
Jamie Strom 
Laurel Crawshaw 



164 



Football 



Soccer 



Soccer (girls) 



Volleyball 



FOOTBALL 

Varsity 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Junior Varsity 

Freshman 

Assistant 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 



National Certified Athletic Trainer - 
(3 seasons) 



Thomas Oubie 
David Gibbs 
Jeffrey Denman 
Michael Slason 
Joseph Farroba 
William Young 

Edward Rock 
William Pope 

Pat Scarsciotti 
Mark Powers 

Wendy Sons ire 
Lynda Bannon 

Lynda Bannon 



All of our interscholastic teams participate in the Tri-Valley League 
which consists of Ashland, Bellingham, Dover-Sherborn, Holliston, 
Hopkinton, Medfield, Medway, Millis and Westwood. Medfield High School is 
currently ranked fifth in the TVL in total enrollment, grades 9-12. The 
Tri-Valley League is highly competitive in all sports with representative 
teams consistently doing well in State tournament play. This past school 
year Medfield placed 11th for all schools in Eastern Massachusetts, Divi- 
sion III in competition for the prestigious Dalton Award given annually by 
the Boston Globe. Criteria involved is based upon winning percentages of 
both boys' and girls' teams in all sports. Over the past several years 
Medfield has consistently finished in the top 20% for Division III schools. 
This is a tribute to our athletes and to the outstanding job our coaching 
staff does year after year. 

We begin our athletic highlights with the Winter Season 1987-88. Our 
girls' indoor track team finished a best ever 4-2-0, setting four indi- 
vidual school records along the way. The boys' indoor track team was suc- 
cessful again, also finishing with a 4-2-0 record. Juniors Jackie Davis 
and Todd Farrell were named league MVP's at the conference meet. Todd won 
the Class D championship in the 50 yard hurdles. Our ice hockey team 
missed tournament play after their "DREAM" season of a year ago. The Big 
Blue were very competitive in the TVL play and won the boys' division of 
the first annual "Medfield Winter Classic" Basketball Tournament during 
February vacation. Our girls basketball team finished 9-9, dropping three 
games by fewer than three points. 

The spring of 1988 (very wet for the second year in a row) proved very 
successful for Medfield teams. The softball team finished second in the 
Tri-Valley and went on to the Division III Quarterfinals before dropping a 
4-3 decision to League rival Ashland. Our baseball team, though perhaps 
not reaching preseason goals, were competitive in every game. With our 
junior varsity club finishing 16-2, we are eagerly awaiting the spring of 
1989. Girls (6-2) and boys (L-3) track had outstanding seasons. Our track 
program in Medfield has quietly become a "POWER" over the past three years. 
Girls tennis was once again very strong finishing at 13-3 and qualifying 



165 



for tourney play for the fourth straight year. SIX of our girls were voted 
to the TVL Ail-Star Team! The boys tennis team, with many young, inexperi- 
enced players, finished 7-6 and now look confidently to the future. 

Our girls soccer program, continuing its fine tradition, qualified for 
tourney play for the tenth time in the past thirteen years. This past fall 
brought a new face to the sideline, boys soccer coach Ed Rock. The boys 
narrowly missed tournament qualification in 1988 and are expected to make a 
good run at the TVL title next fall. Co-captain Kevin Foley was named All 
Eastern Massachusetts. The football team finished 6-3-1 led by TVL defen- 
sive player-of-the-year, Todd Farrell. Our football program, sporting a 
21-7-2 record over the past three seasons is now one of the finest in the 
league. Cross country, with a winning record for the third year in a row, 
is alive and well in Medfield. The team, boasting several strong, young 
runners, looks to another good year in 1989. Volleyball, another young 
team (only two seniors) finished seventh in the TVL. Highlights include a 
late season victory over Millis, at Millis, closing the season. Field 
hockey enjoyed another solid season finishing fourth with a record of 5-5 
and 6 ties! 

The three sports recognition evenings in November, March and May were 
well attended and included many outstanding presentations by our coaching 
staff. The annual all-sports athletic banquet co-sponsored by the Medfield 
School Boosters was held in late May. Medfield High School Athletic "Wall 
of Fame* 1 1988 inductees included: William Palumbo, Class of 1922, Robert 
Farrell 1950, Chuck Munroe 1954, John Belmont 1956, Nancy Williams 1962, 
Michael Rogers 1963 and Deen Brais 1964. Each inductee was in attendance 
and briefly addressed the audience of over five hundred. At the banquet, 
in addition to the individual sport MVP awards, Michelle Couture and 
Matthew Taylor were name the 1987-88 scholarship-athlete recipients. 

At the June graduation exercises Athena Exarhopoulos and Joshua Peck 
were named recipients of the school boosters spirit award. The Robert 
Porack Memorial Scholarship in boys basketball was awarded to Robert Henry. 
The Robert Belmont Memorial Track Spirit Award was presented to Patrick 
Kinsman and David Sutton. 

Tri-Vallev League All-Star selections for 1988 are as follows: 
Boys Basketball - Rob Anderson, Rob Henry 
Girls Basketball - Colleen O'Brien, Betsy Dugan 
Ice Hockey - Erik Fuglestad 

Boys Indoor Track - Todd Farrell, David Sutton 

Girls Indoor Track - Pam Carey, Cindy Coffin, Jackie Davis, Jen Tefft 
Baseball - Darrell Kerr, Matt Taylor 

Softball - Michelle Couture, Betsy Dugan, Colleen O'Brien 
Girls Tennis - Suzie Baldwin, Micki Croke, Sue Develin, Kerri Hoffman, 

Ann Palacio, Allison Swezey 
Boys Track -• John Baker, Bart Garrison, Todd Farrell, Joe Love, Dave 

Sutton 
Girls Track - Cindy Coffin, Jackie Davis, Stephanie Seeley, Jen Tefft 
Cross Country - Brendan Sullivan 
Field Hockey - Heather Carreiro, Detcha Sabourin 
Football - Craig Bumpus, Todd Farrell, Peter Guglietta, Mike 

Keefe 
Boys Soccer - Jim Barton, Kevin Foley, Kirk Plesh 
Girls Soccer - Tara Benhardt, Paula DeVasto, Michelle Pritcni 



166 



Our fall and winter cheering teams were again coached by Susan Medina. 
Both teams were outstanding. The support, enthusiasm and direction they 
give our teams, student body and spectators is exemplary. The girls work 
long hours perfecting their routines and are actively involved in the plan- 
ning of all rallies and homecoming. The team again did very well in cheer- 
ing competition, bringing several championship trophies back to Medfield. 

Our entire athletic department's preventive and rehabilitative sports 
medicine program continues to expand under the leadership of National Cer- 
tified Athletic Trainer Lynda Bannon. This past fall she initiated a stu- 
dent trainer program involving seven MHS students. During this school year 
approximately 15% of the high schools in Massachusetts can "boast" a certi- 
fied athletic trainer. Those of us most directly involved in athletics -- 
coaches, athletes and parents certainly appreciate the fact that we are one 
of those schools. 

So concludes my fourth annual report of the Director of Athletics. I 
sincerely thank the School Committee, the Administration, Medfield School 
Boosters and the community for the support given the athletic program this 
past year ending December 31, 1988. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas E. Cowell 
Director of Athletics 

REPORT OF THE MEDFIELD ADULT 
EDUCATION PROGRAM 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

January 19, 1988 was the beginning of the second semester of the 
1987-88 Adult Education Program. A total of eleven classes in thirteen 
different courses were continued by the Director. The courses were: Driv- 
ers Education, Aerobics, Word Processing, Golf, Body Toning, Stained Glass, 
Photography, Men's Basketball, Painting, Flower Arrangement and Quilting. 
All courses were offered on Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday evenings between 
7:00 and 10:00 p.m. 

The 1988-89 Adult Education Program had an initial offering of twenty- 
three courses, offered on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings. Seven- 
teen (17) courses were established with double offerings in Drivers Educa- 
tion, Golf and Body Toning. Two hundred and seventy-seven (277) adults 
were registered for the fall program. 

Adult Education fees were increased from $19.00 to $22.00 for the ten 
(10) week courses, and from $26.00 to $30.00 for the 15 week courses. 
Drivers Education fees increased from $21.00 to $26.00. The Adult 
Education Program continues to be self-supporting. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Cuoco 
Director 



167 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL 
LUNCH PROGRAM 



To Superintendent of Schools: 

The year 1988 was both good and bad for the Food Services Department. 
The bad was the loss of over half the Food Services staff, the malfunction 
of a freezer and the substantial food loss, and the lack of hot water at 
one school for over a month. However, with the use of disposable products, 
revised menus and the patience and support of our clientele, we came 
through all of it quite well. 

We are currently quite efficiently staffed in every school. Our par- 
ticipation has grown by 9.3 percent from 118,632 meals sold in 1987 to 
126,575 meals sold in 1988 -- even with the three percent drop in the 
school population. Our books closed in the black as follows (January 1 
through December 31, 1988): 

INCOME: 

Lunch Program Receipts $173,562.87 (82.2%) 
Function Receipts 7,457.60 ( 3.5%) 

Government Reimbursement 30,281.54 (14.3%) 



Total Income $211,302.01 



Food Item Purchases $101,448.08 (49.1%) 

Non-food Purchases 12,610.19 ( 6.1%) 

Miscellaneous Expenses 1,056.59 ( .5%) 

Labor 91,675.51 (44.3%) 



Total Expenses $206,790.37 

There is currently a national trend to emphasize good health and good 
nutrition. The United States Department of Agriculture revised all their 
school lunch recipes and had nutrient studies made of all government com- 
modity foods and U.S.D.A. recipes. In keeping with the national trend, our 
lunch program has moved toward a more nutritious way of feeding our stu- 
dents what they like. More fresh fruits and vegetables have been added to 
the menus. More nutritious snacks are offered in our Snack-A-Day Program 
at the elementary level and on our a la carte lines at the secondary lev- 
els, with yogurt added at every level. 

A special program began last spring for the Grade 5 Health classes at 
the Dale Street School to help promote good eating habits and school lunch. 
Each Grade 5 Health class created a special menu and their parents were in- 
vited to eat lunch on the day their special menu was prepared in the caf- 
eteria. This was a great learning experience in which many people became 
involved. 



168 



The Middle School Student Council prepared a month of lunches for the 
Middle School last spring. Also, last spring, to go along with the Food 
Services Department supervision of the kindergarten snack program, each 
kindergarten student was treated to a mini-lunch in the school cafeteria as 
an introduction to the lunch program. The program will be combined with 
their end-of-the-year visitation day to the Wheelock School. 

In an effort to speed up lines and increase participation, the High 
School has a new serving set up this year. One line is a regular served 
Type "A" lunch and the other line is a self-serve line of pre-packaged 
items from which the students can choose. 

Last spring the Food Services staff was in-serviced with a video on 
sanitation and this coming spring the National Dairy and Food Council will 
in-service the staff on marketing school lunches and on the handling and 
proper storage of milk and dairy products. 

A special note of thanks should be made to everyone who participated 
in our systemwide questionnaire. Even though questionnaires are 
time-consuming to tally, they are an invaluable source of information. The 
results of these surveys will be coming out soon. 

The pre-paid Meal Ticket Program continues to be a success this year. 

So many things are being done in our schools to promote good health 
and yet there is so much more that a Food Services Director can do. It is 
a challenge every step of the way. No success can ever come about without 
the positive support of the entire Food Services staff (managers, workers, 
food transfer person, secretary) and the substitutes, the school adminis- 
trators, our clientele (both student and staff) and the parents of 
Medfield. 

Special thanks, also, to the members of the School Committee, Superin- 
tendent Reis and Assistant Superintendent Hogan for allowing the Food Ser- 
vices Department the freedom to initiate all these new ideas and programs 
in order to better serve our clientele and the community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Anna L. Floser 

Food Services Director 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is a pleasure to submit my first annual report as Director of 
Buildings and Grounds for the year ending December 31, 1988. 



169 



The following is a compilation of repairs, replacements, additions and 
preventative maintenance projects accomplished during the year. 

HIGH SCHOOL: Accomplished repairs to existing roof on building wings. 
Installation of safety rails to handicap ramp and auditorium. Installation 
of a new air dryer system for boiler heating controls. Replacement of 
floor tile in several areas of hallways and complete cooking lab. New 
paved walkway connecting this school to the Middle School. New fencing in- 
stalled near shop/garage. 

MIDDLE SCHOOL: Replacement of main copper hot water tank in boiler 
room. Window shades were replaced as needed. Replacement of floor tile in 
several areas of first floor. Kitchen drainage system 
cleaned/repaired/remodif ied. Installation of two computer controlled cir- 
cuits to both boilers. Installation of new energy-saving lighting system 
in several areas of first and second floors. 

DALE STREET SCHOOL: Replacement of stage curtain. All lockers on 
first floor/front wing were painted. New playground plus new pavement for 
playground. New overhead ceiling for central office and Room 19. Instal- 
lation of energy-saving lighting system through entire building. 

RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL : Installation of two swing gate fences at 
building corners for safety. Installation of energy-saving lighting system 
for large gym. Continuation of fencing for fields. Replacement of two new 
exit doors. 

MEMORIAL SCHOOL: Replacement of three exit doors on building wings. 
Replacement of fuel oil tank for boilers. One main roof drain was repaired 
and remodified. 

ALL SCHOOLS: All boilers, burners, fire boxes and chimneys were 
cleaned and repaired as deemed necessary. Replaced glass and repaired dam- 
ages caused by vandalism. Baseball/football fields were upgraded to ath- 
letic standards. Gym floors, bleachers and stages were revarnished. 
Univent raotors/thermostats/belts were replaced where necessary. All re- 
frigerators and freezers were repaired where necessary. Time clocks and 
scoreboards were repaired. Emergency generators were repaired to full op- 
erational status. 

In addition to the specifics listed above, the maintenance/custodial 
department was happy to provide assistance to all school festivals, ath- 
letic functions, shows and for other community groups making use of the 
building. 

I am grateful for the support given to me by my entire staff. Sincere 
appreciation is extended to the School Committee, Superintendent and the 
Assistant Superintendent for their cooperation and assistance during the 
year . 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Puzas 

Director of Buildings and Grounds 



170 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1988 



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183 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

WARRANT FOR PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

March 8, 1988 

Norfolk, ss 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in 
Primaries to vote at Precincts 1, 2, 3, 4 at the Memorial School 
Auditorium, Adams Street, on Tuesday, the eighth day of March, 1988 from 
6:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the Presidential Primary for the 
candidates of political parties for the following offices: 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE. ... FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

STATE COMMITTEE MAN. . .1st SUFFOLK & NORFOLK SENATORIAL DISTRICT 
STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN. .1st SUFFOLK & NORFOLK SENATORIAL DISTRICT 
WARD OR TOWN COMMITTEE MEDFIELD 

The polls will be open from 6 A.M. to 8 P.M. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings 
thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given unto our hands this 16th day of February, 1988 A.D. 

William F. Nourse, Chairman 
Ann B. Thompson, Clerk 
Robert J.Larkin 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 

Norfolk, ss 

PURSUANT TO THE WITHIN WARRANT, I have notified and warned the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield by posting up attested copies of the 
same at five public places fourteen days before the date of the meeting, 
as within directed. 

/s/ George W. Kingsbury, Constable 
February 17, 1988. 



184 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
STATE PRIMARY 
MARCH 8, 1988 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. 
with the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes 
were Inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, 
voting list displayed and instruction to the voters were posted. 

WARDEN: Mabel le Maguire 

TELLERS: Mary MairEtlenne, Adelaide Cochrane, Gale Rad, Lorraine 

Holland, Emmy Mitchell, Eleanor Anes, Joan Bussow, Margaret 

O'Brien, Dorothy Sumner, Priscilla Anderson, and Katherine 

Buchanan. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 2,235. 1005 Republicans, 1,230 Democrats. 
Total Registered Voters numbered 5,946, 37% of the voters voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were 
as follows: 



DEMOCRATIC BALLOTS 



PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 
Michael J. Dukakis 
Albert Gore, Jr. 
Florenzo DiDonata 
Paul Simon 
Bruce Babbitt 
Richard E. Gephardt 
Jessie L. Jackson 
Gary Hart 

Lyndon H. LaRouche, Jr. 
Mario Cuomo 
No Preference 
Blanks 

STATE COMMITTEE MAN 

Christopher P. Cawley 
Marc D. Draisen 
Blanks 

STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 

Maura Henri igan Casey 
Blanks 

WARD OR TOWN COMMITTEE 
Ann J. Grady 
Michael Taanaro 
Deborah A. Clancy 
Richard D. Hlnkley 
James F. Barton 
Adeline H. Cochrane 
Richard P. DeSorgher 



PRECINCT 
2 3 4 



TOTAL 

718 

70 

5 

48 

14 

140 

196 

12 

3 

6 

9 

9 



586 
191 
453 



802 
428 



124 
119 
126 
123 
118 
126 
128 



185 



William H. Dunlea, Jr. 115 

Edna Hlnkley 124 

George Hlnkley 125 

Paul E. Hlnkley 123 

Peter S. Hinkley 123 

William E. Horan 121 

Jane N. Kelly 115 

William F. Mohan 114 

Bernard J. Honbouquette, Jr. 116 

Joyce C. Notine 115 

Ed son Rafferty 114 

Margaret M. Vasaturo 115 

Robert H. Williams 116 

Susan L. Williams 115 

Paul J. Alfano 121 

Robert M. Finn 115 

L. Paul Gal ante, Jr. 115 

Susan Hinkley 8 

Lisa Hinkley 12 

Scattered 7 

Blanks 

REPUBLICAN BALLOTS 

PRESIDENTIAL 

Pierre S. duPont, IV 16 

Marion G. (Pat) Robertson 20 

George Bush 573 

Alexander M. Haig, Jr. 7 

Jack Kemp 78 

Bob Dole 290 

No Preference 12 

Blanks 6 

Scattered 3 

STATE COMMITTEE MAN VOTE FOR ONE MAN 

Timothy F. O'Brien 497 

Anthony F. Pastel is 257 

Blanks 251 

STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN VOTE FOR ONE WOMAN 

Catherine Day-Nelson 658 

Blanks 347 

WARD OR TOWN COMMITTEE VOTE FOR NOT MORE THAN THIRTY- FIVE 

Barbara F. Spalding 626 

Robert Kolstl 617 

Weston G. Kolsti 619 

William E. Adams 601 

Steven C. Rei chert 562 

William F.Nourse 612 

Carlene M. Nourse 562 

Nancy S. Franke 641 

Nancy J. Preston 729 

William D. Walsh 611 

Bruno J. Pal umbo 625 

Pauline A. Coulter 651 

Robert L. Coulter 643 



186 



Edward H. Bayllss 649 

Mabel le E. Hagulre 600 

Richard G. Connors 623 

Jeanne B. Harding 616 

Donald H. Harding 622 

Lawrence D. Clark 579 

Marguerite G. Sauer 602 

Ronald J. Graham 579 

Charles H. Peck 623 

Stephanie C. Peck 624 

Richard H. Heillgmann 622 

Arthur L. Farrar 661 

Marilyn E. Farrar 636 

E. Augusta Clark 581 

Donald E. Church 586 

Dwight E. Adams 628 

Jean 0. Butler 588 

Blanks 99 

Polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

BALLOT COUNTERS: Leonard Anes, Jean Butler, Jeanne Clark, Judy Plank, 

Irene 0'Toole, Nancy Franke, George Mentzer, Barbara Armstrong, 
Elizabeth Dugan, and Patricia Russell. 

After the results were announced, the ballots, checked voting lists and 
tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as 
prescribed by law. 



A TRUE COPY ATTEST 



Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 



187 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

March 28, 1988 

Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, 
greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and 
1n Town affairs, to meet at the Memorial School, 1n said Medfield, on 
Monday, the twenty-eighth day of March, A.D., 1988 at 6:00 A.M., then and 
there to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually 
by ballot, viz: 

One Moderator for one year. 

One Town Clerk, one Assessor, one Selectman, 

two members of the Board of Trustees of the Public Library, 

one member of the School Committee. 
One member of the Planning Board and 

one member of the Housing Authority for five years each. 
QUESTION OF PUBLIC POLICY 

PROPOSITION 2-1/2 DEBT SERVICE EXEMPTION QUESTIONS 

Shall the town of Medfield be allowed to exempt from the provisions of 
Proposition 2-1/2, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bond 
issued for the purposes of designing and constructing street sewers 
within the town of Medfield? 

Yes No 

Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to exempt from the provisions of 
Proposition 2-1/2, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bond 
issued for the purposes of acquiring additional land to protect the 
Town's water supply from contamination? 

Yes No 

The polls will be open at 6:00 A.M. and shall be closed at 8:00 P.M. 

On Monday, the twenty-fifth day of April, A.D., 1988, commencing at 7:30 
P.M. the following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury 
School gymnasium 1n said Medfield, viz: Articles 2 through Article 51. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants 1n said Medfield, seven 
days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fall not and make due return of this warrant with your doings 
thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 
Given unto our hands this 8th day of March, Nineteen Hundred and 
Eight-eight A.D. 

William F. Nourse 
Ann Thompson 
Robert J. Larkin 



188 



SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



Norfolk, ss March 16, 1988 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of 
the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the 
time and for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said 
warrant in not less than five public places in the Town of Medfield at 
least seven days before the time of holding the meeting. 

/s/ George W. Kingsbury 
Constable of Medfield 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 



189 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
TOWN ELECTION 
MARCH 28, 1988 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. 
with the reading of the warrant, and the swearing in of the election 
workers present. The ballot boxes were inspected and found to be in 
working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was displayed and 
instructions to the voters posted. 

The following workers were assigned to their precincts: 

WARDEN: Mabel le Maguire 

TELLERS: Mary MairEtienne, Adelaide Cochrane, Gale Rad, Katherine 
Buchanan, Lorraine Holland, Margaret O'Brien, Eleanor Anes, 
Dorothy Sumner, Joan Bussow, Priscilla Anderson and Marion 
Bosselman. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 1821. Absentee ballots 36. 

Total Registered Voters numbered 5,998. 33% of the voters voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as 

follows: 



MODERATOR 







PRECINCT 








1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


(one year) VOTE FOR ONE 












Ralph C. Copeland 


277 


402 


369 


366 


1414 


Blanks 


93 


113 


100 


96 


402 


Scattered 


2 




2 


1 


5 



1821 



SELECTMAN (three years) VOTE FOR ONE 
Harry T. Mitchell 
William F. Nourse 
Harold Pritoni, Jr. 
Blanks 



TOWN CLERK (three years) VOTE FOR OK 
Nancy J. Preston 
Blanks 



ASSESSOR (three years) VOTE FOR ONE 
William D. Walsh 
Blanks 
Scattered 



77 


82 


89 


96 


344 


52 


97 


84 


75 


308 


239 


333 


284 


286 


1142 


4 


3 


14 


6 


27 


296 


430 


394 


407 


18 
1527 


76 


85 


77 


56 


294 


282 


414 


361 


379 


11 
1436 


90 


101 


110 


83 

1 


384 

1 



1821 



1821 



190 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (three years) VOTE FOR ONE 

Teresa A.Fannin 251 380 341 

Blanks 118 133 125 

Scattered 3 2 5 



LIBRARY TRUSTEE (three years) VOTE FOR NOT MORE THAN TWO 



David B. Allan 

Alison I. Piper 

John A. Bond 

Ann H. Williams 

Patricia J. Whitney 

Blanks 

Scattered 



156 
104 
66 
109 
124 
183 
2 



248 
113 
77 
200 
132 
260 



211 
122 
113 
140 
141 
215 



354 

108 

1 



254 
108 
118 
130 
128 
188 



1326 

484 

11 



1821 



869 
447 
374 
579 
525 
846 
2 



3642 



PLANNING BOARD (five years) VOTE FOR ONE 

Stephen M. Nolan 155 

Joseph R. Parker 183 

Blanks 34 



HOUSING AUTHORITY (five years) VOTE FOR ONE 
Richard Denton 262 

Blanks 110 



236 

242 

37 



395 
120 



194 

235 

42 



357 
114 



187 

247 

29 



368 
95 



772 
907 
142 



1821 



1382 
439 



1821 
PROPOSITION 2-1/2 DEBT SERVICE EXEMPTION QUESTIONS. 

QUESTION ONE. 

Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to exempt from the provisions of 
Proposition 2-1/2, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bond 
issued for the purposes of designing and constructing street sewers 
within the Town of Medfield? 



YES 

NO 

Blanks 



144 


277 


216 


230 


867 


204 


215 


233 


213 


865 


24 


23 


22 


20 


89 



1821 



QUESTION TWO. 



Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to exempt from the provisions of 
Proposition 2-1/2, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bond 
issued for the purposes of acquiring addltonal land to protect the Town's 
water supply from contamination. 



YES 


233 


333 


303 


296 


1165 


NO 


117 


159 


149 


149 


574 


Blanks 


22 


23 


19 


18 


82 



1821 



The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 



191 



BALLOT COUNTERS: Leonard Anes, Jeanne Butler, Jeanne Clark, Irene 
O'Toole, Nancy Franke, George Mentzer, Barbara Armstrong, Elizabeth 
Dugan, Patricia Rioux, Bevely Smith, Patricia Lorantos, Ann Mentzer, 
Elmer Portmann 

After the results were announced, the ballots, checked voting lists and 
tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as 
prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
FOR THE TRANSACTION OF BUSINESS 

April 25, 1988 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 7:40 P.M. at the 
Amos Clark Kingsbury High School Gymnasium after ascertaining that a 
quorum was present. Ms. Grace Ann Gatz lead those present in the singing 
of the National Anthem after the salute to the flag. 

Following the reading of the service of the Warrant for the meeting, 
as well as a review of the procedural rules by the Moderator, the 
following action was taken on the articles appearing in the warrant: 

NOTE: The action taken on all articles will be recorded in their 

regular sequence regardless of the order on which they were voted. 

The meeting briefly adjourned at 7:55 P.M. (after voting Article 10) 
for Revenue Sharing Hearing $1,522.84 Insurance Acct. 1*155-200. 

Reconvened at 7:57 P.M. 

Report of the Warrant Committee was presented. 

The following articles as printed in the warrant were passed on the 
Consent Calendar: Articles 2, 3, 4, 5,6, 7, 8, 9 and 10. 

ARTICLE 2. To see 1f the Town will vote to accept the reports of the 
several Town Officers for the past year. 

VOTE: Voted to accept the reports of the several Town 
officers for the past years. (Consent Calendar, 
4/25/88) 

ARTICLE 3. To see 1f the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1988, 
in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to 
renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 



192 



VOTE: Voted unanimously to authorize the Town Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 
1988, in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to Issue 
a note or notes therefor, payable within one 
year, and to renew any note or notes as may be 
given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
17. (Consent Calendar, 4/25/88) 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector to use all 
means in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to 
that office. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to authorize the Collector to 
use all means in the collections of taxes as the 
Treasurer might if elected to that office. 
(Consent Calendar, 4/25/88) 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named 
sums as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake 
Cemetery, the interest thereof as may be necessary for said care, viz: 

John Allan Lot $ 200.00 

Phyllis M. Prince Lot 300.00 

James & Nancy Bridges Lot 300.00 

Walter R. Nye Lot 800.00 

John & Nancy Preston Lot 800.00 

Joseph E. Allen Lot 100.00 

Anna Rossi Lot 400.00 

Edward & Donna Baker Lot 200.00 

Robert & Karen Naughton Lot 800.00 

Enrico Ippoliti Lot 200.00 

Goucher-Ahern Lot 400.00 

Pauline Goucher Lot 50.00 

Clifford & June Doucette Lot 1200.00 

John & Marion Miner Lot 800.00 

J. Fred Whittier Lot 200.00 

Robert & Florence Vollmuth Lot 1200.00 

Michael & Carole Rogers Lot 1000.00 

Edward & Joanne Murray Lot 800.00 

Joseph & Carol Cafferelli Lot 2000.00 

Joseph & Patricia Mariani Lot 800.00 

Arthur & Marilyn Farrar Lot 2000.00 

Richard & Myrna Denton Lot 2000.00 

Edward E. MacKay Lot 200.00 

David & Dorcas Owen 1000.00 

Ralph & Clair Shaw Lot 800.00 

Edward & Barbara Sullivan Lot 800.00 

William MacLaughlin Lot 200.00 

Lowell Adams Lot 200.00 

Robert & Amelia Kennedy Lot 800.00 

Richard D. Weiker, Sr. Lot 400.00 

John & Irene O'Toole Lot 800.00 

Paul & Bernadette Curran Lot 800.00 

Robert & Lillian Mozer Lot 800.00 

David & Jane Desilets Lot 200.00 



193 



Robert & Margaret Taylor Lot 200.00 

H. Tracy & Emma B. Mitchell Lot 200.00 

Richard & Hope Fuglestad Lot 800.00 

Richard & Kathleen Fiske Lot 200.00 

Robert E. Erickson Lot 150.00 

Shirley M. O'Donnell Lot 300.00 

Joseph W. Volk, Jr. Lot 300.00 

Lillian Paraschos Lot 400.00 

Claire E. Green Lot 600.00 

Alanson H. Clark 200.00 

Edward & Geraldine Ferreira Lot 800.00 

Philip & The 1 ma Meader Lot 800.00 

Michael & Susan Medina Lot 200.00 

Frances & Theresa Hebert Lot 200.00 

Thomas & Jane McGinnis Lot 200.00 

Herbert & Rose Burr Lot 100.00 

Orrin & Helen Gould Lot 200.00 

Harold & Ann Mott Lot 800.00 

Sante Granchelli Lot 200.00 

John & Sylvia Bartnik Lot 600.00 

Margaret Hughes Lot 200.00 

Arthur & Priscilla Caira Lot * 400.00 

Winslow & Anne Crocker Lot 400.00 

Henry & Mary Chaves Lot 400.00 

Hattie Wall Lot 200.00 

Robert & Patricia Simmons Lot 800.00 

Walker Maker Lot 200.00 

William H. Sims Lot 200.00 

Frances & Virginia Cusack Lot 400.00 

Louis & Doris Droste Lot 400.00 

James T. Regan Lot 800.00 

Paul M. Halloran Lot 800.00 

Marianne & James O'Connell Lot 400.00 

Margaret Cashen Lot 200.00 

Arthur Dalo Lot 200.00 

Robert T ravers Lot 200.00 

Frank D. Kennedy Lot 200.00 

Joseph J. Zuccarini Lot 800.00 

VOTE: Voted to accept the sums named as Perpetual Trust 

funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake 
Cemetery, the interest thereof as may be 
necessary for said care, as printed in the 
warrant. The vote was unanimous. (Consent 
Calendar, 4/25/88) 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept an equal education op- 
portunity grant for fiscal year 1988 in the amount of $105,145.00 and for 
fiscal year 1989 in the amount of $105,145.00, under the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 70A, Section 5 as inserted by Chapter 188 of the 
Acts of 1985. Said grant shall be expended by the Tri-County Regional 
School District Committee for direct service expenditures, or do or 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Tri-County Regional Vocational 
Technical School) 



194 



VOTE: Voted unanimously to accept an equal education 
opportunity grant for fiscal year 1988 in the 
amount of $105,145.00 and for fiscal year 1989 in 
the amount of $105,145.00 under the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 70A, Section 5 as inserted 
by Chapter 188 of the Acts of 1985. Said grant 
shall be expended by the Tri-County Regional 
School District Committee for direct service 
expenditures. (Consent Calendar, 4/25/88) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the town will vote to amend Article VII, Section 
3B of the bylaws to increase the late filing fee for dog licenses from 
$10. to $25., or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Clerk) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend Article VII, Section 
3B of the Bylaws to increase the late filing fee 
for dog licenses from $10. to $25. (Consent 
calendar, 4/25/88) 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer and 
Collector to enter into compensating balance agreements during fiscal 
year 1989 as permitted by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
53F, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Treasurer and Collector) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to authorize the Treasurer and 
Collector to enter into compensating balance 
agreements during fiscal year 1989 as permitted 
by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 53F. (Consent Calendar, 4/25/88) 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the town will vote to amend the Town Bylaws by 
numbering the bylaw adopted pursuant to article 20 of the special town 
meeting of April 27, 1982 as Section 5. of ARTICLE I. TOWN MEETINGS , by 
renumbering the ARTICLE XI UNDERGROUND UTILITIES INSTALLATION to number 
XII, and to number an unnumbered section CIVIL DEFENSE DEPARTMENT as 
ARTICLE XIII , or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Town Bylaws by 
numbering the bylaw adopted pursuant to Article 
20 of the Special Town Meeting of April 27, 1982 
as Section 5. of Article I. TOWN MEETINGS , by 
renumbering the AR TICLE XI UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 
INSTALLATION to number XII and to number an 
unnumbered section CIVIL DEFENSE DEPARTMENT as 
ARTICL E XIII. (Consent Calendar, (4/25/88) 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of 
the Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 57B providing for 
property tax not in excess of $50.00 to be due and payable in a single 
payment, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Collector of Taxes and 
Board of Assessors) 



195 



VOTE: Voted unanimously to accept the provisions of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59 , Section 
57B providing for property tax not 1n excess of 
$50.00 to be due and payable In a single payment. 
(Consent Calendar, 4/25/88) 

7:55 P.M. Adjourned for Revenue Hearing. $1,522.94 Insurance 155-200. 

Reconvened at 7:57 P.M. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and 
compensation of the following elected officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, 
Treasurer, Selectmen, Assessors, School Committee, Trustees of the Public 
Library, Collector of Taxes, Park and Recreation Commission, Planning 
Board, Housing Authority, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to fix the salary and compensation of the 
following elected officers: 



Moderator 




-0- 


Housing Authority 




-0- 


Town Clerk 


$10 


,500 


Tax Collector 


12 


,700 


Treasurer 


12 


,000 


Selectman, Chairman 




900 


Selectman, Clerk 




800 


Selectman, 3rd Clerk 




800 


Assessors, Chairman 




900 


Assessors, Clerk 




900 


Assessors, 3rd Member 




900 


School Committee 




-0- 


Library Trustees 




-0- 


Planning Board 




-0- 


Park & Recreation Commi 


ssion 


-0- 


(4/25/88) 







ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel 
Administration Plan, effective July 1, 1988, to read as follows: 

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 



SALARIED POSITIONS Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 
Police Department 



Police Sergeant 


24,022 


24,989 


26,201 


27,249 




Police Officer 


18,862 


20,185 


21,737 


23,181 


24,108 


Specialist Range 


350 








1,000 


Dog Officer 


18,039 








19,659 



Police Officers designated as Detective, Prosecutor, or 

Photographer/Fingerprinter by the Police Chief shall receive additional 

compensation annually at a rate to be determined by the Police Chief 
within the above Specialist Range. 



196 



TOWN MANAGERIAL POSITIONS 



Minimum 



Midpoint Maximum 



Streets. Water and Sewer Department 
Superintendent of Public Works 

Police Department 
Chief 

Fire Department 
Chief 

Executive Department 
Town Administrator 
Administrative Assistant 

Library 
Director 

Board of Health 

Detached Outreach Worker 



33,000 
36,000 
31,500 



40,000 
24,000 



24,000 



19,323 



41,000 49,000 
44,000 52,000 
39,000 46,500 



50,000 60,000 
29,000 34,000 



29,000 34,000 



24,167 



HOURLY POSITIONS 

Library 

Children's Librarian 
Reference Librarian 



7.74 
7.74 



9.66 10.58 
9.66 10.58 



HOURLY PAID POSITIONS 



Grade Minimum Waqe Minimum 


2nd Step 


3rd Step 


4th Step 


Maximum 


1 3. 


55 5.09 


5.34 


5.63 


5.92 


6.25 


2 


5.34 


5.63 


5.92 


6.25 


6.56 


3 


5.63 


5.92 


6.25 


6.56 


6.93 


4 


5.92 


6.25 


6.56 


6.93 


7.28 


5 


6.25 


6.56 


6.93 


7.28 


7.65 


6 


6.56 


6.93 


7.28 


7.65 


8.06 


7 


6.93 


7.28 


7.65 


8.06 


8.48 


8 


7.28 


7.65 


8.06 


8.48 


8.93 


9 


7.65 


8.06 


8.48 


8.93 


9.42 


10 


8.06 


8.48 


8.93 


9.42 


9.90 


11 


8.48 


8.93 


9.42 


9.90 


10.45 


12 


8.93 


9.42 


9.90 


10.45 


10.97 


13 


9.42 


9.90 


10.45 


10.97 


11.56 


14 


9.90 


10.45 


10.97 


11.56 


12. 16 


15 


10.45 


10.97 


11.56 


12.16 


12.81 


16 


10.97 


11.56 


12. 16 


12.81 


13.48 


17 


11.56 


12. 16 


12.81 


13.48 


14. 16 


18 


12. 16 


12.81 


13.48 


14. 16 


14.87 



Lower rates as authorized by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts mav 
be paid. 



also 



197 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 

GRADE 1 

Swimming Instructor 

Lifeguard Instructor $1221. min. /season 

Laborer 

Playground Counselor 

Lifeguard $1017. min/season 

Intern/Trainee 

GRADE 2 

Library Aide 

GRADE 3 (Presently no jobs.) 

GRADE 4 

Clerk Typist 

Cemetery Foreman 

Minibus Driver, Council on Aging 

GRADE 5 

Library Sr. Aide 

Skilled Laborer 

Secretary 

Executive Director, Council on Aging 

GRADE 6 

Col lector/Bookkeeper/Secretary 

GRADE 7 

Police Matron 
Skating Supervisor 
Traffic Supervisor 

GRADE 8 (Presently no jobs.) 

GRADE 9 

Senior Secretary 
Truck Driver 
Special Police Officer 
Permanent Intermittent 
Police Dispatcher 
Call Firefighters 



GRADE 10 

Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 11 

Light Equipment Operator 
Municipal Buildings Custodian 
Administrative Secretary 

GRADE 12 

Wastewater Treatment Plant 

Operator 
Heavy Equipment Operator 
Water Technician 
Groundskeeper 

GRADE 13 

Equipment Operator Repairman 
Finance/Data Processing 

Supervisor 
Senior Groundskeeper 

GRADE 14 

Tree Warden/Insect Pest Control 
Senior Heavy Equipment Operator 
Senior Water Technician 

GRADE 15 

Senior Equipment Operator 

Repairman 
Assistant Wastewater Treatment 

Plant Operator- in-Charge 

GRADE 16 

Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 17 

Street/Water/Sewer Foreman 
Wastewater Treatment Plant 
Operator- in-Charge 

GRADE 18 

Senior Foreman 



198 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 

Animal Inspector 
Waterfront Director 
Assistant Waterfront Director 

Deputy Collector 
Ambulance E.M.T. 
Assistant Dog Officer 

Fire 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Youth Coordinator 
Playground Director 



Police Intern 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Town Counsel 

Tree Climber 

Veterans' Agent 

Inspectors 

Inspector of Buildings 

Local Inspector of Buildings 

Gas Inspector 

Assistant Gas Inspector 

Plumbing Inspector 

Assistant Plumbing Inspector 

Wiring Inspector 

Assistant Wiring Inspector 

Health Agent 

Street Inspector 

Zoning Enforcing Officer 



$994. per year 

$2,836 to $3,701. per year 

$176. to $243. per week 

$1,526. minimum per season 

Fee 

$11 .57 per hour 

$1 ,458. per year 



$1,508. per year 
$518. per year 
$383. per year 
$383. per year 

$3,206. per year 

$133. to $194. per week 

(corrected amts. 8. 

to be voted next town meeting) 
$216. to $284. per week 
$289. per year 
$696. per year 
$1,224. per year 
$13,402. to $22,852. per year 
$6.20 to $10.03 per hour 
$3,597. per year 

$14.33 per inspection 
Annual Minimum $2,775. 
Annual Minimum $371. 
Annual Minimum $765. 
Annual Minimum $139. 
Annual Minimum $2,266. 
Annual Minimum $519. 
Annual Minimum $1,261 
Annual Minimum $371 . 
$14.33 per inspection 
$7.53 per hour 
$14.33 per inspection 



or do or act anything in relation thereto, 



(Personnel Board) 



VOTE: Voted to table Article 12, until May 2, 1988 
meeting. On May 2, 1988 voted unanimously to 
remove it from the table at which time Article 12 
was passed as follows:. 

VOTE: Voted that the Personnel Administration Plan, 
Classification of Positions and Pay Schedules be 
amended effective July 1, 1988 to read as set out 
in the warrant except that "Intern/Trainee" be 
removed from Grade 1 and be placed in Grade_ 2 
that "Library Aide" be changed to "Library 
Assistant" in Grade__2; that "Library Sr. Aide" be 
changed to "Library Sr. Asst. in Grade 5; and 
that "Senior Groundskeeper" be removed from Grade 



199 



1_3 and placed in Grade 14 ; and that certain posi- 
tions shall be amended to read: 



SALARIED POSITIONS, 

Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 
Police Sergeant $26,905 $27,988 $29,345 $30,519 

Police Officer 21,125 22,607 24,345 25,963 $27,001 

and that the following new paragraph shall be added under XV. 
SPECIAL PAY PROVISIONS G. Police Officers: 

A stipend of $200 shall be paid annually in 
the month of June to all full time police 
officers who submit evidence to the Chief of 
Police showing current EMT certification. 
Said stipend not be considered a part of the 
base salary of the police officer. 



and so the Personnel Administration Plan Classification 
of Positions and Pay Schedule will read as follows: 

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 



SALARIED POSITIONS 
Police Department 



Minimum 



2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 



Police Sergeant 


26,905 


27,988 


29,345 


30,519 




Police Officer 


21,125 


22,607 


24,345 


25,963 


27,001 


Specialist Range 


350 








1,000 


Dog Officer 


18,039 








19,659 



Police Officers designated as Detective, Prosecutor, or 

Photographer/Fingerpr inter by the Police Chief shall receive additional 

compensation annually at a rate to be determined by the Police Chief 
within the above Specialist Range. 



TOWN MANAGERIAL POSITIONS Minimum 

Streets, Water and Sewer Department 
Superintendent of Public Works 33,000 

Po 1 i ce Depa rtment 

Chief 36,000 

Fire Depar t ment 

Chief 31,500 

E xecutive Department 

Town Administrator 40,000 

Administrative Assistant 24,000 



Midpoint Maximum 
41,000 49,000 
44,000 52,000 
39,000 46,500 



50,000 60,000 
29,000 34,000 



200 



Library 

Di rector 

Board of Health 

Detached Outreach Worker 

HOURLY POSITIONS 



24,000 



19,323 



29,000 34,000 



24,167 



Library 












Children's Librarian 






7.74 


9.66 


10.58 


Reference Librarian 






7.74 


9.66 


10.58 


HOURLY PAID POSITIONS 












Grade Minimum Wage 


Minimum 


2nd Step 


3rd Step 


4th Stec 


Maximum 


1 3.55 


5.09 


5.34 


5.63 


5.92 


6.25 


2 


5.34 


5.63 


5.92 


6.25 


6.56 


3 


5.63 


5.92 


6.25 


6.56 


6.93 


4 


5.92 


6.25 


6.56 


6.93 


7.28 


5 


6.25 


6.56 


6.93 


7.28 


7.65 


6 


6.56 


6.93 


7.28 


7.65 


8.06 


7 


6.93 


7.28 


7.65 


8.06 


8.48 


8 


7.28 


7.65 


8.06 


8.48 


8.93 


9 


7.65 


8.06 


8.48 


8.93 


9.42 


10 


8.06 


8.48 


8.93 


9.42 


9.90 


11 


8.48 


8.93 


9.42 


9.90 


10.45 


12 


8.93 


9.42 


9.90 


10.45 


10.97 


13 


9.42 


9.90 


10.45 


10.97 


11.56 


14 


9.90 


10.45 


10.97 


11.56 


12.16 


15 


10.45 


10.97 


11.56 


12.16 


12.81 


16 


10.97 


11.56 


12.16 


12.81 


13.48 


17 


11.56 


12.16 


12.81 


13.48 


14.16 


18 


12.16 


12.81 


13.48 


14.16 


14.87 



Lower rates as authorized by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts may 
be paid. 



also 



201 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 

GRADE 1 

Swimming Instructor 

Lifeguard Instructor $1221. min/season 

Laborer 

Playground Counselor 

Lifeguard $1017. min/season 

GRADE 2 

Library Assistant 
InternArainee 

GRADE 3 (Presently no jobs.) 

GRADE 4 

Clerk Typist 

Cemetery Foreman 

Minibus Driver, Council on Aging 

GRADE 5 

Library Sr. Assistant 

Skilled Laborer 

Secretary 

Executive Director, Council on Aging 

GRADE 6 

Col lector/Bookkeeper/Secretary 

GRADE 7 

Police Matron 
Skating Supervisor 
Traffic Supervisor 

GRADE 8 (Presently no jobs.) 

GRADE 9 

Senior Secretary 
Truck Driver 
Special Police Officer 
Permanent Intermittent 
Police Dispatcher 
Call Firefighters 



GRADE 10 

Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 11 

Light Equipment Operator 
Municipal Buildings Custodian 
Administrative Secretary 

GRADE 12 

Wastewater Treatment Plant 

Operator 
Heavy Equipment Operator 
Water Technician 
Groundskeeper 

GRADE 13 

Equipment Operator Repairman 
Finance/Data Processing 
Supervisor 

GRADE 14 

Tree Warden/Insect Pest Control 
Senior Heavy Equipment Operator 
Senior Water Technician 
Senior Groundskeeper 

GRADE 15 

Senior Equipment Operator 

Repairman 
Assistant Wastewater Treatment 

Plant Operator- in-Charge 

GRADE 16 

Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 17 

Street/Water/Sewer Foreman 
Wastewater Treatment Plant 
Ope rator- i n-Charge 

GRADE 18 

Senior Foreman 



202 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 

Animal Inspector 
Waterfront Director 
Assistant Waterfront Director 

Deputy Collector 
Ambulance E.H.T. 
Assistant Dog Officer 

Fire 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Youth Coordinator 

Playground Director 

Police Intern 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Town Counsel 

Tree Climber 

Veterans' Agent 

Inspectors 

Inspector of Buildings 

Local Inspector of Buildings 

Gas Inspector 

Assistant Gas Inspector 

Plumbing Inspector 

Assistant Plumbing Inspector 

Wiring Inspector 

Assistant Wiring Inspector 

Health Agent 

Street Inspector 

Zoning Enforcing Officer 



$994. per year 

$2,836 to $3,701. per year 

$176. to $243. per week 

$1,526. minimum per season 

Fee 

$11.57 per hour 

$1 ,458. per year 



$1,508. per year 
$518. per year 
$383. per year 
$383. per year 

$3,206. per year 

$133. to $194. per week 

$216. to $284. per week 

$289. per year 

$696. per year 

$1,224. per year 

$13,402. to $22,852. per year 

$6.20 to $10.03 per hour 

$3,597. per year 

$14.33 per inspection 
Annual Minimum $2,775. 
Annual Minimum $371. 
Annual Minimum $765. 
Annual Minimum $139. 
Annual Minimum $2,266. 
Annual Minimum $519. 
Annual Minimum $1,261 
Annual Minimum $371. 
$14.33 per inspection 
$7.53 per hour 
$14.33 per inspection 
(5/2/88) 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to add to the Personnel 
Administration Plan, SECTION XV. SPECIAL PAY PROVISIONS , a new paragraph 
under subsection B. Snow Removal as follows: 

The rate for employees whose regularly scheduled work week 
includes Sundays and holidays shall be determined by the 
Personnel Board. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 



VOTE: Voted to add to 
Plan, SECTION XV. 
paragraph 
follows: 
scheduled 
shall be 
(4/25/88) 



the Personnel Administration 

SPECIAL PAY PROVISIONS , a new 

under subsection B. Snow Removal as 

The rate for employees whose regularly 

work week includes Sundays and Holidays 

determined by the Personnel Board. 



203 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Bylaw 
by adding to Article VII STEP INCREASES - MERIT , the following: 

B. Management Pay for Performance: Employees in town management 
positions as set out in the CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY 
SCHEDULE are specifically excluded from receiving the General 
Increase set out in paragraph A. hereof, but will be 
considered on their anniversary dates for increases in accordance 
with a performance rating system to be adopted and amended from 
time to time by the Personnel Board. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

VOTE: Voted to amend the Personnel Bylaw by adding to 
Article VII STEP INCREASES- MERIT the following: 

B. Management Pay for Performances : Employees 1n 
town management positions as set out in the 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 
are specifically excluded from receiving the 
General Increase set out in paragraph A. 
hereof, but will be considered on their 
anniversary dates for increases in accordance 
with a performance rating system to be 
adopted and amended from time to time by the 
Personnel Board. (4/25/88) 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to amend the bylaws, article 
IV - POLICE REGULATIONS . SECTION i. . by deleting from the end of the 
first paragraph the words "unless otherwise provided by law" and 
inserting in place thereof the words "as provided herein" and by adding 
the following paragraphs to said section : 

The Personnel Board shall draft, and may from time to time 
amend, a set of qualifications and procedures for selection of a chief of 
police, one of which shall be at least seven years of police experience, 
except that each year of supervisory experience in the rank of sergeant 
or higher shall count for two years. The set of qualifications and 
procedures shall be filed with the Town Clerk as a public record. Prior 
to making an appointment, the Selectmen shall cause notice of the avail- 
ability of the position to be posted in all places in the Town where 
notices to employees are generally posted and to be advertised in a 
newspaper of general circulation in the Town and in such other pub- 
lications as can reasonably be expected to give notice to qualified 
applicants. At least sixty days after the publication of the first 
notice of the availability of the position, the appointment shall be made 
by the Board of Selectmen in accordance with the qualifications and 
procedures on file with the Town Clerk, except that one or more of the 
qualifications or procedures may be waived by the Board of Selectmen. 

Without his consent in writing, the Police Chief shall not be discharged, 
removed, suspended for a period exceeding five days, lowered in rank or 
compensation, nor shall his office or position be abolished, except for 
just cause and for reasons specifically given him in writing by the Board 
of Selectmen. At least three days after the Selectmen have given the 
Police Chief a written statement of the specific reasons for the 
contemplated action, he shall be given a full hearing before them or 



204 



before a hearing officer appointed by them for that purpose. Within ten 
days after the hearing the Police Chief shall be given a written notice 
of the decision of the Board of Selectmen stating fully and specifically 
the reasons therefor. 

A suspension of the Police Chief for a period not exceeding five days may 
be made by the Chairman of the Board of Selectmen only for just cause. 
Within twenty-four hours of his suspension the Police Chief shall be 
given written notice stating the specific reason for the suspension and 
informing him that he may, within forty-eight hours of receipt of the 
notice, request in writing a hearing by the Board of Selectmen on the 
question of whether there was just cause for the suspension. Such a 
hearing shall be held within seven days of receipt of the written notice 
from the Chief. Within seven days after the hearing the Board of 
Selectmen shall give the Chief written notice of its decision. By a 
majority vote the Board of Selectmen may find that the suspension was for 
just cause, or may reduce the number of days of the suspension, or may 
find that it was without just cause. If the suspension is found to be 
without just cause the Chief shall be deemed not to have been suspended 
and he shall be entitled to compensation for the period for which he was 
suspended. If the number of days of the suspension are reduced by the 
full board after hearing, the Chief shall receive compensation based on 
the number of days restored. 

Any hearing under this section shall be public if requested in-writing by 
the Police Chief and he shall be allowed to answer the charges against 
him either personally or through counsel. 

The Police Chief may petition the Superior Court in Norfolk or any 
successor court having similar jurisdiction for review of any decision of 
the Board of Selectmen under this section within thirty days following 
receipt of the decision. Within thirty days of receipt of notice of the 
filing of a petition for such review in the Superior court, the Board of 
Selectmen shall file a complete copy with the court of all proceedings 
before them, certified by the clerk of the board, and they may file an 
answer to any allegations in the petition. The review shall be conducted 
by the court and shall be confined to the record, except that in cases of 
alleged irregularities in procedure, not shown in the record, testimony 
thereon may be taken in court. 

If application is made to the court for leave to present additional 
evidence, and it is shown to the satisfaction of the court that the 
additional evidence is material to the issues in the case, and that there 
was good reason for failure to present it in the proceeding before the 
Board of Selectmen, the court may order that the additional evidence be 
heard by the Board of Selectmen upon such conditions as the court deems 
proper. The Board of Selectmen may modify its findings and decision by 
reason of such additional evidence and shall file with the court the 
additional evidence together with any modified or new findings or 
decision. 

The court may affirm the decision of the Board of Selectmen if it finds 
that the decision was justified, or remand the matter for further 
proceedings before the Board of Selectmen, or the court may set aside and 
reverse the decision if it determines that such decision is: 

(a) in violation of constitutional provisions; 

(b) in excess of the authority of the Board of Selectmen; 

(c) based upon an error of law; 



205 



(d) made upon unlawful procedure; 

(e) unsupported by substantial evidence; 

(f) arbitrary or capricious, an abuse of discretion, or otherwise not in 
accordance with law. 

If the court finds that the decision of the Board of Selectmen should be 
reversed, the Police Chief shall be reinstated in his position without 
loss of compensation. The decision of the court shall be final and 
conclusive. 

Any notice required under this section may be delivered by hand or mailed 
to the address shown in the records of the Town. A certificate of the 
person mailing the notice shall be proof of giving of notice. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to amend the bylaws, Article IV. POLICE 
REGULATIONS. SECTION 1. . by deleting from the end 
of the first paragraph the words "unless 
otherwise provided by law" and inserting in place 
thereof the words "as provided herein" and to 
change the word "Chairman" in the third paragraph 
second line to "majority". 

Section 1. The Board of Selectmen shall appoint 
a Chief of Police who shall receive such pay as 
the Board of Selectmen shall determine, unless 
otherwise specially voted by the Town, and shall 
hold said office until another is appointed in 
his stead, subject to removal of said Board, as 
provided herein. 

The Personnel Board shall draft, and may from 
time to time amend, a set of qualifications and 
procedures for selection of a chief of police, 
one of which shall be at least seven years of po- 
lice experience, except that each year of su- 
pervisory experience in the rank of sergeant or 
higher shall count for two years. The set of 
qualifications and procedures shall be filed 
with the Town Clerk as a public record. Prior to 
making an appointment, the Selectmen shall cause 
notice of the availability of the position to be 
posted in all places in the Town where notices to 
employees are generally posted and to be 
advertised in a newspaper of general circulation 
in the Town and in such other publications as can 
reasonably be expected to give notice to 
qualified applicants. At least sixty days after 
the publication of the first notice of the avail- 
ability of the position, the appointment shall be 
made by the Board of Selectmen in accordance with 
the qualifications and procedures on file with 
the Town Clerk, except that one or more of the 
qualifications or procedures may be waived by the 
Board of Selectmen. 



206 



Without his consent in writing, the Police Chief 
shall not be discharged, removed, suspended for a 
period exceeding five days, lowered in rank or 
compensation, nor shall his office or position be 
abolished, except for just cause and for reasons 
specifically given him in writing by the Board of 
Selectmen. At least three days after the 
Selectmen have given the Police Chief a written 
statement of the specific reasons for the 
contemplated action, he shall be given a full 
hearing before them or before a hearing officer 
appointed by them for that purpose. Within ten 
days after the hearing the Police Chief shall be 
given a written notice of the decision of the 
Board of Selectmen stating fully and specifically 
the reasons therefor. 

A suspension of the Police Chief for a period not 
exceeding five days may be made by the Chairman 
of the Board of Selectmen only for just cause. 
Within twenty-four hours of his suspension the 
Police Chief shall be given written notice 
stating the specific reason for the suspension 
and informing him that he may, within forty-eight 
hours of receipt of the notice, request in 
writing a hearing by the Board of Selectmen on 
the question of whether there was just cause for 
the suspension. Such a hearing shall be held 
within seven days of receipt of the written 
notice from the Chief. Within seven days after 
the hearing the Board of Selectmen shall give the 
Chief written notice of its decision. By a 
majority vote the Board of Selectmen may find 
that the suspension was for just cause, or may 
reduce the number of days of the suspension, or 
may find that it was without just cause. If the 
suspension is found to be without just cause the 
Chief shall be deemed not to have been suspended 
and he shall be entitled to compensation for the 
period for which he was suspended. If the number 
of days of the suspension are reduced by the full 
board after hearing, the Chief shall receive 
compensation based on the number of days 
restored. 

Any hearing under this section shall be public if 
requested in writing by the Police Chief and he 
shall be allowed to answer the charges against 
him either personally or through counsel. 

The Police Chief may petition the Superior Court 
in Norfolk or any successor court having similar 
jurisdiction for review of any decision of the 
Board of Selectmen under this section within 
thirty days following receipt of the decision. 
Within thirty days of receipt of notice of the 
filing of a petition for such review in the 
Superior court, the Board of Selectmen shall file 
a complete copy with the court of all proceedings 



207 



before them, certified by the clerk of the board, 
and they may file an answer to any allegations in 
the petition. The review shall be conducted by 
the court and shall be confined to the record, 
except that in cases of alleged irregularities 1n 
procedure, not shown in the record, testimony 
thereon may be taken in court. 

If application is made to the court for leave to 
present additional evidence, and it 1s shown to 
the satisfaction of the court that the additional 
evidence is material to the issues in the case, 
and that there was good reason for failure to 
present it in the proceeding before the Board of 
Selectmen, the court may order that the 
additional evidence be heard by the Board of 
Selectmen upon such conditions as the court deems 
proper. The Board of Selectmen may modify its 
findings and decision by reason of such 
additional evidence and shall file with the court 
the additional evidence together with any 
modified or new findings or decision. 

The court may affirm the decision of the Board of 
Selectmen if it finds that the decision was 
justified, or remand the matter for further 
proceedings before the Board of Selectmen, or the 
court may set aside and reverse the decision if 
it determines that such decision is: 

(a) in violation of constitutional provisions; 

(b) in excess of the authority of the Board of 
Selectmen; 

(c) based upon an error of law; 

(d) made upon unlawful procedure; 

(e) unsupported by substantial evidence; 

(f) arbitrary or capricious, an abuse of 
discretion, or otherwise not in 
accordance with law. 

If the court finds that the decision of the Board 

of Selectmen should be reversed, the Police Chief 

shall be reinstated in his position without loss 

of compensation. The decision of the court shall 
be final and conclusive. 

Any notice required under this section may be 
delivered by hand or mailed to the address shown 
in the records of the Town. A certificate of the 
person mailing the notice shall be proof of 
giving of notice. 

YES 275 NO 212 (4/25/88) 



208 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or transfer 
from available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any 
other Town Officer, Board, Commission and Committee to defray operating 
expenses of the Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, ig88, or such 
other sums as the Town may determine as required by General Laws, Chapter 
41, Section 108, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to appropriate the following sums of money 
to defray operation expenses of the Town for the 
fiscal year commencing July 1, 1988. 





ARTICLE 16 




OPERATING BUDGET 




FISCAL 1989 APPROPRIATIONS 


ACCOUNT 


DESCRIPTION F89 TWN HTG APPROP. 


100-01 


SELECTMEN 


100 


PERSONNEL 2,500 


200 


OPERATIONS 8,662 



TOTAL 



11,162 



100-03 TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 
100 PERSONNEL 
200 OPERATIONS 



350,265 
850 



TOTAL 



351,115 



100-04 DATA PROCESSING 
200 OPERATIONS 



TOTAL 100-01,03,04 

101-00 TOWN COUNSEL 
100 PERSONNEL 
200 OPERATIONS 



TOTAL 



25,130 

25,130 

387,407 



20,687 
3,660 



TOTAL 



24,347 



102-00 


TREASURER 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 



12,000 
12,570 



TOTAL 



24,570 



103-00 


TAX COLLECTOR 




100 


PERSONNEL 


12,700 


200 


OPERATIONS 


11,640 




TOTAL 


24,340 


104-00 


TOWN CLERK 




100 


PERSONNEL 


10,500 


200 


OPERATIONS 


1,790 



TOTAL 



12,290 



209 



ARTICLE 16 
OPERATING BUDGET 
FISCAL 1989 APPROPRIATIONS 

ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION F89TWNMTG APPROP. 



105-00 


ASSESSORS 






100 


PERSONNEL 




2,700 


200 


OPERATIONS 


TOTAL 


40,505 




43,205 


106-00 


PLANNING BOARD 






200 


OPERATIONS 


TOTAL 


14,015 




14,015 


107-01 


PARK & RECREATION 




100 


PERSONNEL 




31,425 


200 


OPERATIONS 




26,240 




TOTAL 


57,665 


108-00 


ELECTIONS & REGIST. 




100 


PERSONNEL 




1,567 


200 


OPERATIONS 




22,200 




TOTAL 


23,767 


109-00 


TOWN HALL 






100 


PERSONNEL 




19,202 


200 


OPERATIONS 




36,200 


500 


EQUIPMENT 








TOTAL 55,402 



110-04 


HIGHWAY 






100 


PERSONNEL 




271,505 


200 


OPERATIONS 


TOTAL 


127,440 




398,945 


110-05 


SIDEWALKS 






200 


OPERATIONS 




3,420 






TOTAL 


3,420 


110-06 


SNOW & ICE 






100 


PERSONNEL 




50,237 


200 


OPERATIONS 




71,456 


500 


CAPITAL 


TOTAL 






121,693 


110-07 


TOWN GARAGE 






200 


OPERATIONS 




16,880 


500 


CAPITAL 


TOTAL 






16,880 


110-08 


EQUIP. REPAIR/MAINT 




100 


PERSONNEL 




51,342 


200 


OPERATIONS 


TOTAL 


81,400 




132,742 


TOTAL 110-04,05,06,07,08 


673,680 



210 



ARTICLE 16 

OPERATING BUDGET 

FISCAL 1989 APPROPRIATIONS 

ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION F89 TWN MTG APPROP. 



111-01 


POLICE ADMINISTRATION 




100 


PERSONNEL 


155,802 


200 


OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 


15,300 




171,102 


111-02 


POLICE OPERATIONS 




100 


PERSONNEL 


549,790 


200 


OPERATIONS 


25,780 


500 


CAPITAL 

TOTAL 







575,570 


111-03 


CRUISER 




200 


OPERATIONS 


20,300 


500 


CAPITAL 

TOTAL 






20,300 


111-04 


COMMUNICATIONS 




200 


OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 


15,400 




15,400 


111-05 


TRAFFIC MARKING/SIGN 




200 


OPERATIONS 


6,000 




TOTAL 


6,000 


111-06 


SCHOOL TRAFFIC 




100 


PERSONNEL 


18,321 


200 


OPERATIONS 


300 




TOTAL 


18,621 


TOTAL 111-01.02,03.04,05.06 


806.993 


112-01 


FIRE ADMINISTRATION 




100 


PERSONNEL 


43,106 


200 


OPERATIONS 


1,225 




TOTAL 


44,331 


112-02 


FIRE OPERATIONS 




100 


PERSONNEL 


58,863 


200 


OPERATIONS 


26,625 


500 


CAPITAL 








TOTAL 


85,488 


TOTAL 112-01,02 




129,819 


114-02 TREE CARE 






100 PERSONNEL 




9,507 


200 OPERATIONS 




14,450 



TOTAL 23,957 

211 



ARTICLE 16 

OPERATING BUDGET 

FISCAL 1989 APPROPRIATIONS 

ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION F89 TWN MTG APPROP. 



115-00 


INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 




100 


PERSONNEL 




28,165 


200 


OPERATIONS 




2,434 






TOTAL 


30,599 


119-00 


SEALER 






100 


PERSONNEL 




1,226 


200 


OPERATIONS 


TOTAL 


195 




1,421 


120-00 


DOG OFFICER 






100 


PERSONNEL 




22,578 


200 


OPERATIONS 


TOTAL 


2,015 




24,593 


121-00 


CIVIL DEFENSE 






200 


OPERATIONS 




2,430 


500 


CAPITAL 










TOTAL 


2,430 


122-00 


APPEALS 






200 


OPERATIONS 


TOTAL 


4,440 




4,440 


123-00 


STREET LIGHTS 






200 


OPERATIONS 




49,000 






TOTAL 


49,000 


125-00 


BOARD OF HEALTH 




100 


PERSONNEL 




6,732 


200 


OPERATIONS 


TOTAL 


8,354 




15,086 


125-01 


OUTREACH 






100 


PERSONNEL 




21,676 


200 


OPERATIONS 




1,882 






TOTAL 


23,558 


126-00 


PUBLIC HEALTH 






200 


OPERATIONS 


TOTAL 


7,550 




7,550 


128-00 


MENTAL HEALTH 






200 


OPERATIONS 




9,470 






TOTAL 


9,470 


129-00 


AMBULANCE 






100 


PERSONNEL 




20,803 


200 


OPERATIONS 
CAPITAL 




4,875 



TOTAL 25,678 



212 



ARTICLE 16 

OPERATING BUDGET 

FISCAL 1989 APPROPRIATIONS 



ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION 



F89 TWN MTG APPROP. 



130-00 


SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL 




100 


PERSONNEL 




67,270 


200 


OPERATIONS 




84,100 


500 


TIPPING FEE 




152,770 






TOTAL 


304,140 


131-01 


SEWER DEPARTMENT 




100 


PERSONNEL 




105,793 


200 


OPERATIONS 




132,195 


400 


CREDITS 




-9,656 




CAPITAL 


TOTAL 


2,000 




230,332 


132-01 


VETERANS OPERATION 




100 


PERSONNEL 




3,599 


200 


OPERATIONS 




6,631 






TOTAL 


10,230 


132-02 


GRAVE MARKERS 






200 


OPERATIONS 




560 






TOTAL 


560 


133-00 


MEMORIAL DAY 






200 


OPERATIONS 




650 






TOTAL 


650 


134-00 


COUNCIL ON AGING 




100 


PERSONNEL 




20,059 


200 


OPERATIONS 




6,888 



TOTAL 



26,947 



100 


PERSONNEL 


93,600 


200 


OPERATIONS 


39,280 


400 


CREDITS 







TOTAL 


132,880 


140-00 


WATER DEPARTMENT 




100 


PERSONNEL 


110,829 


200 


OPERATIONS 


138,869 


400 


NEW SERVICES 
CAPITAL 






TOTAL 


249,698 


145-00 


CEMETERY COMMISSION 




100 


PERSONNEL 


27,722 


200 


OPERATIONS 


31,855 


400 


CREDITS 


-20,000 


500 


CAPITAL 





TOTAL 



39,577 



213 



ARTICLE 16 
OPERATING BUDGET 
FISCAL 1989 APPROPRIATIONS 

ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION F89 TWN MTG APPROP. 



146-00 
200 
400 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
OPERATIONS 
CAPITAL 


2,000 
2,000 


148-00 
200 


TOTAL 
HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
OPERATIONS 


4,000 
638 


150-01 
400 


TOTAL 
TOWN DEBT-PRINCIPAL 
OTHER CHARGES 


638 
390,600 


150-02 
400 


TOTAL 
TOWN DEBT- INTEREST 
OTHER CHARGES 


390 , 600 
253,550 


TOTAL 150-01.02 


253,550 
644,150 


155-00 
200 


INSURANCE 

OPERATIONS 


719,638 


156-00 
200 


TOTAL 
FEDERAL MANDATES 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 


719,638 

439 
55,600 


160-00 
100 
200 


TOTAL 
TOWN REPORT/TOWN MEETING 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 


56,039 

1,259 
7,400 


161-00 
200 


TOTAL 
COUNTY RETIREMENT 
OPERATIONS 


8,659 
343,054 


162-00 
200 


TOTAL 
STABILIZATION FUND 
OPERATIONS 


343,054 
50,000 


163-00 
200 


TOTAL 
RESERVE FUND 
OPERATIONS 


50,000 
70,000 


171-00 
200 


TOTAL 
WARRANT COMMITTEE 
OPERATIONS 


70,000 
72 




TOTAL 


72 



214 





ARTICLE 16 




OPERATING BUDGET 




FISCAL 1989 APPROPRIATIONS 


ACCOUNT 


DESCRIPTION F89 TWN MTG APPROP. 


175-00 


PERSONNEL BOARD 


100 


PERSONNEL 1,721 


200 


OPERATIONS 275 



TOTAL 1,996 

TOWN SUB TOTAL 5,388,542 

it********************************************** 

180-00 REGIONAL VOC/TECH 



200 


OPERATIONS 




109,908 




TOTAL 


109,908 


1000 


SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 




100 


PERSONNEL 




212,741 


200 


OPERATIONS 




54,930 




TOTAL 


267,671 


2000 


INSTRUCTION 






100 


PERSONNEL 




5,136,148 


200 


OPERATIONS 




360,906 






TOTAL 


5,497,054 


3000 


OTHER SCHOOL SERVICES 




100 


PERSONNEL 




97,910 


200 


OPERATIONS 




492,153 




TOTAL 


590,063 


4000 


PLANT OPERATIONS 




100 


PERSONNEL 




349,241 


200 


OPERATIONS 




569,079 




TOTAL 


918,320 


7000 


ACQUISITION OF 


ASSETS 




200 


OPERATION 




36,082 






TOTAL 


36,082 


9000 


PROGRAMS/OTHER DISTRICTS 




200 


OPERATIONS 




266,900 




TOTAL 


266,900 



TOTAL 1000,2000,3000,4000, 

. 7000,9000 7,576,090 

************************************************ 

ARTICLE 16 
TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET - FISCAL 1989 

TOTAL VOC. TECH SCHOOLS 109,908 

TOTAL IN TOWN SCHOOLS 7,576,090 

TOTAL TOWN 5,388,542 



13,074,540 



215 



ARTICLE 17. To see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate on the 
fiscal 1988 tax levy and/or transfer from available funds for Capital 
Expenditures including the following: 



Department 
Park & Recreation 
Town Hall 
Highway 



Item 

Parking Lots/Repairs 

Mortar Repairs 

Adams St. Sidewalk, Drain 
Resurface Subdivision 
Marlyn Road Drainage 
One Ton Dump Truck (P1) 
One Ton Dump Truck (H-5) 
Sander 

Police Cruisers 

Replace Doors & Window 

Garage/Emergency Vehicle 

Compactor 
Trailer 

Minuteman Library 

3/4 Ton Pickup Truck (W2) 
Ford Car (W3) 

Cemetery Building 
One Ton Dump Truck 
Tractor 

Truck Replacement 
Wheelock Sewer Connection 
Middle School Bleacher 
On-Going Field Improvement 
Middle School Chimney 
High School Auditorium Seats 

and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the School Committee be further 
authorized to contract with and otherwise treat with any federal and 
state agencies for reimbursement of the cost of any capital 
expenditures; and that the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee 
respectively be authorized to trade or sell toward part of the purchase 
price, the following: 



Police 

Fire 

Civil Defense 

Solid Waste 

Library 
Water 

Cemetery 
School 



Trade: 

Department 

Highway 



Police 
School 



Trade In 

1980 One Ton Dump Truck 

1983 One Ton Dump Truck 

Sander 

1986 Ford Bronco 

1986 Ford Crown Victoria 

Rack Body Dump Truck 



216 



Water 1980 Ford Sedan 

1982 3/4 Ton Pickup Truck 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Capital Budget Committee) 

VOTE: Voted that the following sums be appropriated for 
capital expenditures: 



Department 
Town Hall 


Item 

Mortar Repairs 


$35,000. 


Highway 


Resurface subdivisions 
One ton dump truck H-5 
One ton dump truck P-1 
Sander 


50,000. 
18,000. 
18,000. 
10,000. 


Police 


Cruisers 


28,000. 


Fire 


Replace doors/windows 


15,000. 


Solid Waste 


Compactor 


49,639. 


Library 


Minuteman Library 


14,000. 


Water 


3/4 Ton pickup truck W-2 
Ford Car W-3 


15,000. 
14,000. 


Cemetery 


Cemetery Building 
Tractor 


5,000. 
7,000. 


School 


Truck replacement 


20,680. 



Wheelock sewer connection 20,000. 
Middle School Chimney 9,000. 

TOTAL $ 328,319. 

and that to meet the appropriation $173,680. be raised 
on the 1989 tax levy and that the following sums be 
transferred: 

$30,000. State Highway Funds 

12,549. Highway Equipment Article 16, ATM 1985 

7,451. Highway Equipment Article 16, ATM 1986 

13,800. Land Damages Farm Street Article 23, ATM 1982 

21,200. School Roof Article 21, ATM 1984 

20,000. South Street Bicycle Path, Article 21 of 1984 

49,639. Transfer Station Funds, Article 22 ATM of 1984 

and that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to trade as 
part of the purchase price or to sell the following: 

Department T rade-in 

Highway 1980 One Ton Dump Truck 

1983 One Ton Dump Truck 
Sander 



217 



Police 1986 Ford Bronco 

1986 Ford Crown Victoria 
School Rack Body Dump Truck 

Water 1980 Ford Sedan 

1982 3/4 Ton Pickup Truck 
(4/25/88) 

MOTION to reconsider on 5/2/88 failed. 

ARTICLE 18. To see what action the Town will take on the following 
petition: 

"That the town of Medfield appropriate sufficient funds for the 
installation of a sidewalk on the North side of Adams Street, to run from 
the Dale Street School to the commercially zoned west section beginning 
at approximately 95 Adams Street.", 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. (4/25/88) 

ARTICLE 19. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
on the fiscal 1989 tax levy to be used in conjunction with and 1n 
addition to any funds allotted by the Commonwealth for the construction, 
reconstruction and improvement of roads under the provisions of Section 
34, Chapter 90 of the General Laws, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Superintendent of Public Works) 

VOTE: Voted that the Board of Selectmen be authorized 
to enter into contracts with the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, Department of Public Works and to 
expend funds allotted by the Commonwealth for the 
construction, reconstruction and improvement of 
roads under the provisions of Section 34 of 
Chapter 90 of the General Laws. (4/25/88) 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the 
following named streets, or parts thereof: 

Delaware Road from Station 0+0 to 12+64.99 
Penacook Street from Station 0+00 to 2+74.06 
Whichita Road from Station 17+30.78 to 23+09.56 
Village Way from Station 0+00 to 2+10.00 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to 
in the several Orders of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or 
otherwise, such rights, titles and easements, including drainage 
easements, as may be necessary to accomplish such purposes, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



218 



VOTE: Voted unanimously that the Town accept as 
public ways the following named streets: 
Delaware Road from Station 0+0 to 12+64.99 
Penacook Street from Station 0+0 to 2+74.06 
Whichita Road from Station 17+30.78 to 23+09.56 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as 
shown on plans referred to in the several Orders 
of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office 
and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such 
rights, titles and easements, including drainage 
easements, as may be necessary to accomplish such 
purposes. (4/25/88) 

ARTICLE 21. To see what sum of money the Town will appropriate for the 
purposes of Clause 32 of Section 5 of Chapter 40 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws for the payment of reasonable hospital, medical, surgical, 
nursing, pharmaceutical, prosthetic and related expenses incurred by any 
member of its fire fighting force or any member of its police force as 
the natural and proximate result of an accident occurring, or of 
undergoing a hazard peculiar to his employment, while acting in the 
performance and within the scope of his duty without fault of his own, as 
provided in Section 100 of Chapter 41 of the Massachusetts General Laws, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $10,000 be raised and 
appropriated on the tax levy to provide funds 
under Clause 32 of Section 5 of Chapter 40 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws for the payment of 
reasonable hospital, medical, surgical nursing, 
pharmaceutical, prosthetic and related expenses 
incurred by any member of its firefighting force 
or any member of its police force as the natural 
and proximate result of an accident occurring, or 
of undergoing a hazard peculiar to his 
employment, while acting in the performance and 
within the scope of his duty without fault of his 
own, as provided in Section 100 of Chapter 100 of 
Chapter 41 of the Massachusetts General Laws. 
(4/25/88) 

ARTICLE 22. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to appropriate 
to acquire by gift, purchase or eminent domain or otherwise additional 
land to protect the well number five water supply from contamination and 
to authorize the Water and Sewerage Board to enter into contracts and/or 
receive money from the state and federal government and to authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow under the 
provisions of Chapter 44, Section 8, Clause 3 for the purposes of this 
article, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen and 
Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted that the Selectmen are authorized to 
acquire by purchase, eminent domain or otherwise 
for water supply protection purposes 
approximately 50 acres of land between High 



219 



Street and the railroad tracks which run behind 
the Wheelock School, said land being more par- 
ticularly described as follows: 

Lot 8 and lots 45 through 58, Inclusive, shown on 
Medfleld Assessors' Hap 24, now or formerly of 
Rldgewood Realty Trust and lot 40 on Medfleld 
Assessors' Map 23, now or formerly of Barry P. 
and Candlce A. Palson and Charles and Diane 
Sloan; 

that $1,000,000 1s appropriated for this 
acquisition; that to meet this appropriation the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen is 
authorized to borrow $1,000,000 under General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8 (3); that the Water 
and Sewerage Board with approval of the Selectmen 
is authorized to contract for and expend any 
federal and state aid available for the project 
and to take any other action necessary to carry 
out this project. 

YES 434 NO 6 (4/25/88) 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to transfer custody, and 
control of the Town owned land shown as lot 141 and lot 142 on Assessors 
Map 42 to the Board of Selectmen, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to transfer custody and control of the Town 
owned land shown as lots 141 and 142 on Assessors 
Map 42 to the Board of Selectmen. 

YES 288 NO 71 (4/25/88) 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen, to sell the Town owned land shown as lot 141 and lot 142 on 
Assessors Map 42 for the sum of $1.00 for low and/or moderate income 
housing and to enter into such contracts and other agreements as may be 
necessary, in their judgment, for the purposes of this article, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell 
the Town owned land shown as lots 141 and 142 on 
Assessors Map 42 for the sum of $1.00 for low 
and/or moderate Income housing and to enter into 
such contracts and other agreements as may be 
necessary for the purposes of this article. 
YES 276 NO 37 (4/25/88) 

IT WAS VOTED TO ADJOURN THE MEETING AT 10:45 P.M. TO BE RECONVENED ON 
APRIL 26, 1988 AT 7:30 P.M. AT THE AMOS CLARK KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL GYM- 
NASIUM. 
A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Nancy J. Preston 

220 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 26,1988, 



The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting at the Amos Clark Kingsbury High 
School Gymnasium was called to order at 7:45 P.M. after ascertaining a 
quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
and determine whether that money will be- raised by borrowing or 
otherwise, for the purposes of designing and constructing street sewers 
within the Town of Medfield and to authorize the Water and Sewerage Board 
to enter into contracts with the state and federal government for this 
purpose, and to accept federal and state grants, or reimbursements or 
take any other action relating thereto, and that the Board of Selectmen 
be authorized to acquire by purchase, taking by eminent domain or 
otherwise such rights, titles, permits and easements as are necessary; 
and that to accomplish said purposes, that the Board of Selectmen be 
authorized to enter into contracts with the state and federal governments 
and to accept any applicable federal and state grants or reimbursements; 
and that the Water and Sewerage Board be authorized to assess a portion 
of the costs of said sewers in accordance with the bylaws of the Town of 
Medfield and in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 83 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $2,670,000 is appropriated 
for constructing street sewers within the Town of 
Medfield; that to meet this appropriation the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is 
authorized to borrow $2,670,000 under Chapter 44, 
Section 7, paragraph 1 of the General Laws; that 
the Selectmen are authorized to acquire by 
purchase, eminent domain or otherwise such 
rights, titles, permits and easement as are 
necessary for this project; that the Selectmen 
are authorized to contract for and expend any 
federal or state aid available for the project; 
and that the Water and Sewerage Board is 
authorized to assess a portion of the cost of 
said sewers in accordance with the bylaws of the 
Town of Medfield and in accordance with the 
provisions of Chapter 83 of the General Laws, and 
to add that Carol Ann Drive be included in this 
project. 

YES 292 NO 142 (4/26/88) 

NOTE: A motion for reconsideration was defeated 
on May 2, 1988. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
and determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purposes of 
improving the composting of sludge at the Wastewater Treatment Plant, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water & Sewerage Board) 



221 



VOTE: Voted that the sum of $150,000 be raised on the 
1989 Tax Levy and appropriated for the purposes 
of improving the composting of sludge at the 
Wastewater Treatment Plant. (4/26/88) 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money 
and determine in what manner the money will be raised for the purposes of 
improvements at the Wastewater Treatment Plant, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Water & Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $250,000 be appropriated 
and of that amount $95,700 be raised on the 1989 
Tax Levy and $154,300. be transferred from the 
unexpended balance of sewer project Article 15 of 
the Special Town Meeting of November 1970 for the 
purposes of this article, and that the Board of 
Selectmen and/or the Water and Sewerage Board be 
authorized to enter into contracts and to accept 
funds from the state and/or federal government 
for these purposes. (4/26/88) 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of 
$10,000. and determine in what manner the money will be raised for a 
sewer infiltration inflow study and to authorize the Water and Sewerage 
Board to enter into contracts and to receive funds from the state and/or 
federal government for the purposes of this article, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Water & Sewerage Board) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $10,000.00 be raised on the 
1989 Tax Levy for the purpose of a sewer 
infiltration flow study and that the Water and 
Sewerage Board be authorized to enter into 
contracts and to receive funds from the state 
and/or federal government for the purposes of 
this article. (4/26/88) 

MOTION TO RECONSIDER ARTICLE 25 WAS MADE. RECONSIDERATION WAS 
DEFEATED ON MAY 2,1988. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money for the purpose of conducting a Hazardous Household Waste 
Collection day, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $4,000. be raised on the 
•1989 Tax Levy and appropriated for the purpose of 
conducting a hazardous household waste 
collection. (4/26/88) 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum 
of money for the purpose of defraying the expenses of purchasing, 
erecting and removing holiday lights and decorations over public ways of 
the town, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 
222 



VOTE: Voted the sum of $2,000 be raised on the 1989 Tax 
Levy and said sum be appropriated for the purpose 
of defraying the expenses of purchasing, erecting 
and removing holiday lights and decorations over 
public ways of the town. (4/26/88) 



ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 13, permitting the 
establishment of a Municipal Buildings Insurance Fund, and to see what 
sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate on the fiscal 1989 tax 
levy for said fund, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to accept the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 40, Section 13 and that the 
Town establish a Municipal Buildings Insurance 
fund pursuant to said section. (4/26/88) 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 71, Section 71F establishing a 
revolving fund for nonresident students tuition receipts, said funds to 
be expended by the School Committee without appropriation by the Town, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 71, Section 
71F requiring that all monies received as tuition 
payments for nonresident students and as state 
reimbursements for students who are foster care 
children shall be deposited with the treasurer 
and held as separate accounts. The receipts held 
in such a separate account may be expended by the 
School Committee without further appropriation 
for expenses incurred in providing education for 
such non resident students or for such students 
who are foster care children. 

(4/26/88) 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to approve proposed Rules and 
Regulations for the Town of Medfield Cemeteries prepared by the Cemetery 
Commissioners, the full text of which is available for examination at the 
Town Hall and the Public Library, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Cemetery Commissioners) 

VOTE: Voted that the RULES AND REGULATIONS for the 
Medfield Cemeteries proposed by the Cemetery 
Commissioners as follows be approved: 



223 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

CEMETERY RULES AND REGULATIONS 

The Town of Medfield, Board of Cemetery Commissioners, has 
designed this booklet as a guide to the proper use of the Town 
Cemeteries. These rules may be adjusted by the Commissioners, as 
needed, to carry out their duties. The general cemetery rules are 
listed first, followed by specific areas and ending with a 
glossary of cemetery terms. 

The Commissioners, and the Superintendent stand ready, at all 
times, to answer any questions you may have pertaining to any of 
our cemeteries. 

Adopted by the Commissioners on this 5th day of October, 1987 

Eric O'Brien, Chairman 
David HcCue, Clerk 
Walter Reynolds 

H. Tracy Mitchell, Superintendent 



GENERAL RULES 

1. The cemeteries shall be open from dawn to dusk, and after 
dusk all unauthorized persons must leave the grounds. 

2. Visitors shall respect the solemnity of the cemeteries and 
strictly observe the rules which have been established for 
the purpose of securing quiet and good order at all times 
within the grounds. 

3. No lot or portion of a lot may be sold except by or through 
the hands of the Commissioners, and no division of any lot 
may be made unless expressly authorized by them, and on the 
death of the person having charge of a lot, the survivors 
shall arrange with the commissioners as to who will succeed 
to the charge of the lot as provided in Massachusetts 
General Laws, chapter 114, section 28 - 33. 

4. If a lot owner wishes to assure burial privileges to another 
individual in said lot, he may do so by notifying the 
Cemetery Commission in writing. This must be signed, dated 
and notarized. 

5. The Commission shall make reasonable efforts to protect 
flowers, trees, shrubs, and other property, but the Cemetery 
Commission shall accept no responsibility for their 
protection nor replacement. 

6. Picnics, parties, and those persons with refreshments are 

not allowed in the cemeteries. No alcoholic beverages are 
allowed. 

7. Firearms and dogs running at large are prohibited in the 
cemeteries. 



224 



8. Entering the cemeteries, except through the regularly 
established entrances, is prohibited. 

9. Plucking flowers, plants, or shrubs, whether cultivated or 
wild, breaking or injuring any property whatsoever, 
including birds, squirrels and other animals 1s prohibited. 
Driving on lawns is also absolutely prohibited. 

10. Loitering or intruding upon a funeral service , or standing 
about an open grave to satisfy idle curiosity, is strictly 
prohibited. 

11. Driving or riding in any vehicle 1n the cemetery, with the 
intent to pass through, is prohibited. 

12. The following are forbidden in the cemeteries: 
Rollerskating and skateboarding; the use of motorized 
recreational vehicles, horseback riding; a display and or 
sale of goods, wares, or merchandise; instructing persons in 
the use and operation of a motor vehicle; the use of 
cemetery roadways for pleasure driving. 

13. No tomb, mausoleum, crypt, or other structure (intended 
for above ground interment) may be constructed within the 
bounds of the cemetery without the written approval of the 
Board of Cemetery Commissioners. 

14. The said lot shall not be used for any other purpose than a 
place of burial for the human dead; no trees within the lot 
or border shall be cut down, destroyed, or altered, neither 
shall any change be made in a lot except with the approval 
and under the direction of the said Commissioners, who may 
make such change when in their opinion it becomes necessary 
for the safety and or improvement of the Cemetery. 

15. No lot owner shall allow the remains of any person to be 
deposited within the bounds of his lot for profit. 

16. The Superintendent may expel from the grounds, or cause to 
have arrested, any person violating any of these rules and 

regulations. 

SALE OF LOTS 

1. Only residents, or former residents, of Hedfield, 
Massachusetts will be allowed to purchase a lot or grave. 

2. Reservation of a lot or grave space for future use will not 
be allowed. 

3. Where a lot is sold to two or more persons, they shall take 
title as tenants in common. 

4. Perpetual care of a lot does not include care of any kind 
to the monument, markers, bushes, shrubs, plants, flowers 
or trees. 

5. When a deed is issued for a lot, it conveys only the right 
of burial in and access to that lot. It shall be the duty 



225 



of the Commission, or its agent, to enter thereon and remove 
or modify any object or adornment or work done in violation 
of the rules, which may be judged objectionable or injurious 
to the lot, adjoining lot, or cemetery. 

6. The Commission, or its agent, may impose specific 
restrictions on a given lot for sale, or withhold any lot or 
grave from sale, if in their discretion such action is in 
the best interest of the Town of Medfield, or the Cemetery. 

7. The Cemetery Commission, or its agent, may reacquire lots or 
graves from owners who wish to relinquish ownership of said 
lots or graves. Payment will be at the discretion of the 
Commission, and will not Include a reimbursement for 
Perpetual Care. Payment will not be more than the original 
price paid for the burial rights to the lot. 

TRAFFIC 

1. All deeded lots or graves give access to the cemetery and 
convey rights to the use of cemetery roadways where 
consistent with other rules contained herein. 

2. The speed limit in the cemeteries shall be no more than 
five (5) miles per hour. 

3. Any person causing damage with any type of motorized vehicle 
in the cemeteries shall be held liable for the cost of any 
damage . 

4. Horses are specifically prohibited from the cemeteries 
unless they are a part of a funeral cortage or other 
authorized activity. 



INTERMENTS 

1. Only human remains, or cremated human remains may be 
interred within the cemeteries. 

2. All graves shall be opened and closed under the supervision 
of the superintendent or his agent. No interment or 
disinterment will be allowed without the consent of the 
Commission or its agent. 

3. Interments or disinterments will be made only by the 
designated employees of the Town of Medfield, or others 
authorized by the Commission or their agent. 

4. Forty-eight hours notice, whenever possible shall be 
required for opening a grave. 

5. No interment or disinterment will take place Saturday 
afternoons, Sundays, New Years Day, Washington's Birthday, 
Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day, Columbus Day, 
Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day or Christmas Day unless 
required for public health, or at the discretion of the 
Superintendent. 



226 



6. All earth interment burials shall be in a rigid box or vault 
of concrete, steel, copper, or other proven material nor- 
mally used in the construction of vaults, the acceptance of 
such will be at the discretion of the Superintendent or his 
agent. NO wooden boxes or sectional concrete liners will be 
permitted. 

7. Funeral Directors must have all orders for interment signed 
by the lot owner(s) or legal representative of said lot 
prior to burial, and must be accompanied by the necessary 
burial permit and fees. 

8. A grave will not be opened unless all fees (annual care or 
perpetual care) are current. 

9. All interments will be single depth. Double depth 
interments will be allowed only under unusual conditions and 
extenuating circumstances, and then at the discretion of the 
Superintendent. 

10. Interment of up to six (6) cremated remains (ashes) are 
permitted in a single grave, with or without a prior earth 
burial. However, once cremains have been interred there 
will be no earth burial in said grave. 

11. Workmen engaged in the installation of vaults, interments 
and monuments shall be under the control of the 
Superintendent or his agent. 



MEMORIALS (monuments) 

1. Workmen engaged in the erection of memorials, monuments and 
markers of any description shall be subject to the control 
of the Superintendent or his agent. Any workmen failing to 
conform to this rule will not be allowed to continue his 
work. 

2. No monument or other memorial may be brought into the 
cemeteries until an order showing a sketch of the design, 
material, finish, size, and inscription thereon, signed by 
the owner or representative, is first submitted to the 
Superintendent for approval. 

3. The building of foundations shall be performed only by the 
regular employees of the cemeteries, after a signed order by 
the lot owner or representative is approved by the 
Superintendent or his agent. 

4. After monument work has been completed, a dealer or lot 
owner wishing to remove same from the lot must first obtain 
permission from the Superintendent or his agent. 

5. The lower base of all monuments must be dressed to a true 
level on the bottom, so as to bear evenly at all points upon 
the foundation. 

6. No monument can be erected on a lot until the perpetual care 
is paid in full . 



227 



7. Only one upright monument will be allowed on a lot, all 
other memorials to be markers, and installed with the top at 
ground level. 

8. The lot owners of said lot shall have the right to erect 
monuments, cenotaphs, or stones commemorative of the dead, 
but the foundations of all monuments and boulders must have 
the approval of said Commissioners, or their agent. 

9. The Commission or their agent has the right to remove any 
improper monument, cenotaph, effigy or other structure 
determined to be offensive. 

10. Temporary grave markers shall be removed within six (6) 
months following interment, or at the time of installation 
of a permanent memorial, if before six months. 

11. Maximum size for base of monuments permitted: 

10 or more grave lot - 10 feet x 4 feet 

8 grave lot - 6 feet x 1 foot 4 inches 

6 grave lot - 5 feet x 1 foot 2 inches 

4 grave lot - 3 feet x 1 foot 

1,243 grave lots - flat marker/memorials only 

12. Monument overall height not to exceed 3 feet - inches (36 
Inches), except in a lot larger than 4 graves, the maximum 
height not to exceed the length. 

13. All monument bases must be squared by a sawed or rock pitch 
finish and may not exceed 8 inches thickness with sawed 
bottoms. 

14. All flat grass (flush) markers of granite or marble not to 
be less than 4 inches, nor more than 6 inches in thickness 
with sawed bottoms. 

15. Height of the upright portion (die) of monument is not to 
exceed the length or width of the base. 

16. Foundations must be constructed to full size of the base of 
the monument, and to a depth of 5 feet, except for Colonial 
Tablets or Monoliths, which will be determined on an 
individual basis. 

17. Upright monuments, slant face and level top shall be 
installed in the center portion of a lot at the head end of 
said lot in the area provided for same. 

PLANTING 

1. Owners of lots may plant, subject to rules set forth, dwarf 
evergreen shrubs, plants and flower beds. 

2. The Superintendent or his agent has the right to remove 
plants, flowers and shrubs, if in his judgment they become 
unsightly, or in any way detrimental to the adjacent lots, 
avenues or paths. 

3. The cutting of grass in any lot is prohibited. 

228 



4. The placing of potted plants on lots 1s permitted, but 
after they have ceased to bloom they will be removed by the 
owner and disposed of. No glass or crockery containers for 
cut flowers allowed. 

5. The planting or removal of trees shall not be allowed, 
except with the consent of the Superintendent. 

6. The planting of shrubs of any description on lots consisting 
of less than four graves is not permitted. 

7. No person shall erect any mound within any lot or border or 
change the grade of any lot. 

8. The spreading of fertilizer, lime, ashes, or other material 
on lots to stimulate the growth of grass will not be 
permitted. 

9. The planting of rose bushes, rhododendrons, azaleas, twiggy 
bushes, vines or spreading perennials, etc. is not permitted 
without consent from the Superintendent. 

10. One dwarf evergreen shrub on each side of an upright 
monument is permitted. Flush markers are not allowed 
planting privileges of any type, unless the said marker is 
installed in the area for upright monuments. 

11. To make possible the mowing and the care of the lot, it is 
required that the planting of flowers and plants be 
restricted to a space not to exceed 12 inches around the 
monument or gravestone. 

12. Planting of evergreen shrubs must have the approval of the 
Superintendent or his agent. Shrubs shall not exceed half 
the height of the monument. 

13. Winter covering of any nature (wreaths, etc.) must be 
removed from grave site by March 1. 

14. If a monument is to be installed, no permanent planting or 
shrub is allowed until installation of monument. 

15. Planting desired on lots with no markers of any type, may 
only be done with prior approval of the Superintendent or 
his agents. 

ENFORCEMENT OF RULES 

The commission is hereby empowered to enforce all Rules and 
Regulations and to exclude from the Cemetery any person violating 
the same. The Commission shall have charge of the grounds and 
buildings including the conduct of funerals, traffic, employees, 
plot owners and visitors and at all times shall have supervision 
and control of all persons in the Cemetery. 



229 



CORRECTION OF ERRORS 

The Commission reserves, and shall have, the right to correct any 
errors that may be made by it either 1n making interments, 
disinterments or removals, or the description, transfer or 
conveyance of any interment property, either by canceling such 
conveyance and substituting and conveying in lieu thereof other 
interment property of equal value and similar location as far as 
possible, or as may be selected by the Commission, or, in the sole 
discretion of the Commission, by refunding the amount of money 
paid on account of said purchase. In the event such error shall 
involve the interment of the remains of any person in such 
property, the Commission reserves, and shall have the right to 
remove or transfer such remains so interred to such other property 
of equal value and similar location as may be substituted and 
conveyed in lieu thereof. 

DEFINITIONS 



LOT: 



The term lot shall apply to numbered divisions as 



shown on the record card and may consist of two 
or more graves. 

GRAVE: The term grave applies to a space of sufficient 
size to accommodate one full size interment 
and/or up to six cremated remains. 

INTERMENT: The term interment applies to the permanent 
disposition of the remains of a deceased person 
by burial. 

CREMATION: The term cremation means the technical process by 
which human remains are reduced to bone 
fragments. 



DEED: 



The term deed applies to the original conveyance 
document given by the Cemetery Department to the 
original purchaser. 



MEMORIAL: The term memorial shall include a monument or 
marker used for identification on a cemetery lot. 

MONUMENT: The term monument shall include a tombstone or 
memorial of granite, marble or slate which shall 
extend above the surface of the ground. 

MARKER: The term marker means a memorial flush with the 
ground usually located at a particular grave. 

CENOTAPH: A monument or empty tomb honoring a dead person 
whose body is buried elsewhere. (4/26/88) 

*** 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to authorize and direct the 
Selectmen to acquire for open space preservation, protection of water re- 
sources, recreation and conservation purposes by purchase, gift, eminent 
domain or otherwise, a parcel of land on Spring Street shown as a parcel 
33 on the Assessors' Map 32, now or formerly owned by Blanche M. 



230 



Kingsbury, known as Kingsbury Pond, containing 12.8 acres, more or less; 
and to authorize the Selectmen to treat with the Massachusetts Department 
of Public Works for a grant of funds toward the purchase price; and to 
authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow in 
anticipation of said grant; and to see what sum the town will vote to 
appropriate for the purposes of this article, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that the Town authorize and 
direct the Selectmen to acquire for open space 
preservation, protection of water resources, 
recreation and conservation purposes by purchase, 
gift, eminent domain or otherwise, a parcel of 
land on Spring Street shown as a parcel 33 on the 
Assessors' Map 32, now or formerly owned by 
Blanche Kingsbury, known as Kingsbury Pond, 
containing 12.8 acres, more or less; and to 
authorize the Selectmen to treat with the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Works for a 
grant of funds towards the purchase price; and to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $50,000 for the 
purposes of this article. (4/26/88) 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to 
acquire by purchase, eminent domain or otherwise, the parcel of land 
shown as parcel 36 on Medfield Assessors' Map 56 off North Meadows Road, 
now or formerly owned by The Barletta Company for public works facilities 
containing approximately 16.5 acres; to see what sum the town will vote 
to raise and appropriate for this purchase and to determine whether said 
sum shall be raised by taxation, transfer from available funds or 
borrowing or otherwise, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: A motion to purchase the land shown as parcel 36 
on Medfield Assessors map 56 off North Meadows 
Rd. for $500,000 failed to get 2/3 vote. 

YES 160 NO 126 (4/26/88) 

A MOTION TO RECONSIDER WAS MADE AND WILL BE DONE ON MAY 2, 1988. 

RECONSIDERATION ON MAY 2, 1988 FAILED BY 2/3 VOTE. 

YES 160 NO 126 (4/26/88) 

RECONSIDERATION: 

NEW MOTION: To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
the sum of $21,500. to purchase a one year option 
to buy the property described in the above 
article for $500,000. 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $21,500 be raised and 
appropriated to purchase a one year option to buy 
the property described in Article 35 for 
$500,000. (5/2/88) 



231 



ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to propose an amendment to the 

Town Charter to combine the positions of Treasurer and Collector and to 

determine if said positions shall be appointed or elected, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Proposed amendment to Town Charter, combining the 
offices of Town Treasurer and Collector and - 
making the offices appointed failed. 4/26/88 

SUBSTITUTE MOTION: 

Move that the Board of Selectmen be instructed to 
appoint a committee of not more than seven 
members, including the incumbent Treasurer, Tax 
Collector, Town Accountant, Member of the Board 
of Assessors and a member of the Warrant 
Committee to investigate the financial 
administration of the Medfield town government 
and to report its findings back to the 1989 
Annual Town Meeting. Said committee, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, may insert 
articles in the 1989 Town Meeting Warrant to 
implement its recommendations. 

VOTE: Voted to instruct the Board of Selectmen to 
appoint a committee as written in the substitute 
motion above. (4/26/88 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money to 
the 111-02 Police Operations account to operate the department for fiscal 
1988, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Police Chief) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $5,000 be transferred from 
free cash to the 111-02 100 POLICE OPERATIONS 
PERSONNEL ACCOUNT. (4/26/88) 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money to 
the 145-00 Cemetery account to operate the department for fiscal 1988, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Cemetery Commissioners) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $15,000. be transferred 
from free cash to the 145-00 200 OPERATIONS 
CEMETERY ACCOUNT. (4/26/88) 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the town will vote to transfer the sum of 
$20,270.17 from the fiscal 1988 110-04 200 Highway Operations account and 
the sum of $3,893.99 from article 18 of the annual town meeting of 1987 
to fiscal 1987 Highway 110-04 200 Operations Account to defray the costs 
of highway resurfacing projects, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Superintendent of Public Works) 



232 



VOTE: Voted unanimously that the sun of $20,270.17 be 
transferred from the fiscal 1988 110-04 200 
HIGHWAY OPERATIONS ACCOUNT and that the sun of 
$3,893.99 be transferred from the balance of the 
appropriation voted pursuant to Article 18 of the 
1987 Annual Town Meeting to the fiscal 1987 
110-04 200 OPERATIONS ACCOUNT to defray the costs 
of highway resurfacing projects. 
(4/26/88) 

IT WAS VOTED TO ADJOURNED THE MEETING AT 10:32 .P.M., TO BE 
RECONVENED, ON MAY 2, 1988, AT THE AMOS CLARK KINGSBURY HIGH 
SCHOOL AT 7:30 P.M. 



A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MAY 2, 1988 



The meeting was reconvened at 7:40 P.M., May 2, 1988 at the Amos Clark 
Kingsbury High School Gymnasium. Articles 40 through 51 were voted 
followed by the reconsideration of Article 12, Article 25 and Article 35. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning bylaw as 
fol lows: 

Section 11. WATERSHED PROTECTION DISTRICT , by deleting paragraph 11.6 
AREAS AND YARD REGULATIONS : and 

by adding to Table 6.2 Lots a new column entitled "X NON 
Watershed/Flood Plain*", the column to be as follows: 



RE 


60X 


RT 


80% 


RS 


90X 



B 


80X 


BI 


95X 


IE 


80X 



RU 94X 
and by adding to the bottom of the table, the following: 



233 



"The percentage of land not in the Watershed Protection and/or Flood 
Plain District which must be used in calculating minimum lot area." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 
VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw as 
follows: 

Section 11. WATERSHED PROTECTION DISTRICT , by 
deleting paragraph 11.6 AREAS AND YARD 
REGULATIONS : and 

by adding to Table 6.2 Lots a new column 
entitled "X NON Watershed/Flood Plain*", the 
column to be as follows: 



RE 


60% 






B 


80X 


RT 


80X 






BI 


95X 


RS 


90X 


RU 


94X 


IE 


80X 



and by adding to the bottom of the table, the 
following: 

"*The percentage of land not in the Watershed 
Protection and/or Flood Plain District 
which must be used in calculating minimum 
lot area." 
(5/2/88) 



ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, 
Section 12. RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING EARTH REMOVAL USES by 
inserting after the first sentence, "The Board of Selectmen shall grant 
no such permit except in conjunction with the construction of subdivision 
streets approved by the Planning Board; public works or other municipal 
projects approved by a public authority; or private land development 
where the Selectmen find that no reasonable alternative contour plan is 
practicable, and, in that event, that minimal disruption of the natural 
contours of the site may be permitted." 

and by inserting at the beginning of the following sentence, 
"Furthermore,", or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw, 
Section 12. RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING 
EARTH REMOVAL USES by inserting after the first 
sentence, "The Board of Selectmen shall grant no 
such permit except in conjunction with the 
construction of subdivision streets approved by 
the Planning Board; public works or other 
municipal projects approved by a public 
authority; or private land development where the 
Selectmen find that no reasonable alternative 
contour plan is practicable, and, in that event, 



234 



that minimal disruption of the natural contours 
of the site may be permitted." 

and by inserting at the beginning of the 
following sentence, "Furthermore,". (5/2/88) 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw 
Section 14.13 SPECIAL PERMITS FOR SITE PLAN APPROVAL BY PLANNING BOARD . 
14.13.1, by deleting "(See Medfield Land Subdivision Rules & Regulations 
'Table 2 - Fee Schedule.')," and by adding in the first sentence after 
the words "except in conformity with a" the wording "with a Special 
Permit issued by the Planning Board and a"; and by deleting the last 
paragraph; and by adding a new last paragraph as follows: 

The Planning Board shall adopt and from time to time shall amend 
rules and fee schedules relative to the issuance of Special Permits 
and shall file a copy of said rules and fee schedules in the office 
of the Town Clerk; 

and by deleting 14.13.2, 14.13.3 and 14.13.5; by renumbering the present 
14.13.4 to 14.12.2 and by inserting a new 14.13.3 GRANT OF PERMIT as 
fol lows: 

After the public hearing required by Section 14.13.2 of the 
Zoning Bylaw has been held, the Planning Board shall grant a Special 
Permit for Site Plan Approval if it concludes that a special permit 
is warranted by the application and the evidence produced at the 
Public Hearing and if it makes the following findings of fact: 

(a) For multifamily site plans for which more than one structure is 
proposed, placement of structures on the site is appropriate to the 
site and compatible with its surroundings. 

(b) The proposed use will not result in a public hazard due to 
substantially increased vehicular traffic or due to inadequacy of 
the structure or configuration of the road(s) directly serving the 
site. 

(c) The proposed use will not create any danger of pollution to 
public or private water facilities. 

(d) The methods of drainage at the site are adequate and meet the 
standards of the Subdivision Rules & Regulations of the Town of 
Medfield. 

(e) No excessive noise, light or odor shall be emitted. 

(f) The site plan and proposed use(s) conform to all requirements 
of the Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Medfield; 

and by renumbering 14.13.6 to 14.13.4 and titling it DENIAL OF PERMIT : 

and by adding a new section 14.13.5 C ONDITIONS as follows: 

If the Planning Board elects to grant a Special Permit pursuant to 
this Section 14.13, it may impose conditions upon the granting 
thereof at its discretion. No building permit shall be granted 
for construction authorized by Special Permit granted hereunder 
until plans have been submitted to the Building Inspector which 



235 



specify in detail the manner of compliance with any conditions set 
by the Planning Board. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 
VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw 
Section 14.13 SPECIAL PERMITS FOR SITE PLAN 
APPROVAL BY PLANNING BOARD, 14.13.1, by deleting 
"(See Medfield Land Subdivison Rules & 
Regulations "Table 2 -Fee Schedule.")," and by 
adding in the first sentence after the words 
"except in conformity with a" the wording "with a 
Special Permit issued by the Planning Board and 
a"; and by deleting the last paragraph; and by 
adding a new last paragraph as follows: 

The Planning Board shall adopt and from time to 
time shall amend rules and fee schedules relative 
to the issuance of Special Permits and shall file 
a copy of said rules and fee schedules in the 
Office of the Town Clerk; 

and by deleting 14.13.2,. 14.13.3 and 14.13.5; by 
renumbering the present 14.13.4 to 14.12.2 and by 
inserting a new 14.13.3 GRANT OF PERMIT as 
follows: 

After the public hearing required by Section 
14.13.2 of the Zoning Bylaw has been held, the 
Planning Board shall grant a Special Permit for 
Site Plan Approval if it concludes that a special 
permit is warranted by the application and the 
evidence produced at the Public Hearing and if it 
makes the following findings of fact: 

(a) For multifamily site plans for which more 
than one structure is proposed, placement of 
structures on the site is appropriate to the site 
and compatible with its surroundings. 

(b) The proposed use will not result in a public 
hazard due to substantially increased vehicular 
tradffic or due to inadequacy of the structure or 
configuration of the road(s) directly serving the 
site. 

(c) The proposed use will not create any danger 
of pollution to public or private water 
facilities. 

(d) The methods of drainage at the site are 
adequate and meet the standards of the 
Subdivision Rules and Regulations of the Town of 
Medfield. 

(e) No excessive noise, light or odor shall be 
emitted. 



236 



(f) The site plan and proposed use(s) conform to 
all requirements of the Zoning Bylaw of the Town 
of Medfield; 

and by renumbering 14.13.6 to 14.13.4 and titling 
it DENIAL OF PERMIT ; 

and by adding a new section 14.13.5 CONDITIONS 
as follows: 

If the Planning Board elects to grant a 
Special Permit pursuant to this Section 
14.13, it may impose conditions upon the 
granting thereof at its discretion. No 
building permit shall be granted for 
construction authorized by Special Permit 
granted hereunder until plans have been 
submitted to the Building Inspector which 
specify in detail the manner of compliance 
with any conditions set by the Planning 
Board. (5/2/88) 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw by 
changing the wording in Section 7. CLUSTER RESIDENTIAL ZONING by changing 
the word "Cluster" to the words "Open Space" throughout Section 7 and 
wherever it appears in the text, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw by 
changing the wording in Section 7. CLUSTER 
RESIDENTIAL ZONING by changing the word 
"Cluster" To the words "Open Space" throughout 
Section 7 and wherever it appears in the text. 

(5/2/88) 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, 6.2 
TABLE OF AREA REGULATIONS by changing the wording for "Multifamily 
Dwell ing"and "Public Housing for the Elderly" to read as follows: 

RU Multifamily dwelling (3 units) 24,000 

(per additional unit) 6,000 

Public Housing for the Elderly (first unit) 12,000 

(per additional unit) 2,000 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



(Planning Board) 



VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw, 6.2 
TABLE OF AREA REGULATIONS by changing the wording 
for "Multifamily Dwelling" and "Public Housing 
for the Elderly" to read as follows: 



237 



RU Mult if ami ly dwelling (3 units) $24,000 
(per additional unit) 6,000 

Public Housing for the Elderly 

(first unit) 12,000 

(per additional unit) 2,000 

(5/2/88) 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw 
Section 8.1 OFFSTREET PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS . 8.1, Restaurants, 

nightclubs or eating places, number of parking spaces per unit, to read 
as follows: 

One space for each three seats or stools, plus one space for each two 

employees, plus four spaces for each two linear feet of "take-out 
service" counter. 

and by deleting "Fast food takeout establishment and drive-in 
restaurant", or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw 
Section 8.1 OFFSTREET PARKING AND LOADING 
REGULATIONS. 8.1, Restaurants, nightclubs or 
eating places, number of parking spaces per unit, 
to read as follows: 

One space for each three seats or stools, plus 
one space for each two employees, plus four 
spaces for each two linear feet of "take-out 
service" counter, 

and by deleting "Fast food takeout establishment 
and drive-in restaurant". (5/2/88) 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, 
Section 13. SIGN BYLAW . 13.5.4. by deleting the present language and 
inserting the following: 

Temporary Signs in Residential and Business Districts 
(including but not limited to real estate signs, contractor 
and subcontractor, temporary services, etc.): one unlighted 
sign of up to eight (8) square feet pertaining to the sale, 
rental or lease of the premises, or to the services being 
performed on the premises on which the sign is placed. Such 
signs shall be removed within fourteen (14) days after final 
sale, lease or rental, or cessation of services on the 
premises; 

and by deleting the present Section 13.8. 5. c and inserting the following: 

13.8.5.C. For all multi-story, multi-tenant buildings: 

Maximum sign area shall equal 10 times the square 
root of the building sign frontage, plus an 
additional area equal to a maximum of 5 times the 
square root of the upper story sign frontage. 

and by deleting Section 2.1.50 and by inserting the following: 



238 



2.1.50 Sign Frontage, Building 

The length in feet of the building side fronting 
on the street. Only one building side may be used 
as sign frontage. 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



(Planning Board) 



VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw, 

Section 13. SIGN BYLAW. 13.5.4 by deleting the 
present language and inserting the following: 
Temporary Signs in Residential and Business 
Districts (including but not limited to real 
estate signs, contractor and subcontractor, 
temporary services, etc.); one un lighted sign of 
up to eight (8) square feet pertaining to the 
sale, rental, or lease of the premises, or to the 
services being performed on the premises on which 
the sign is placed. Such signs shall be removed 
within fourteen (14) days after final sale, lease 
or rental, or cessation of services on the 
premises; 

and by deleting the present Section 13.8.5.C and 
inserting the following: 

13.8. 5. c For all multi-story, multi-tenant 

buildings: 

Maximum sign area shall equal 10 
times the square root of the 
building sign frontage, plus an 
additional area equal to a maximum 
of 5 times the square root of the 
upper story sign frontage. 

and by deleting Section 2.1.50 and by inserting 
the following: 

2.1.50 Sign Frontage, Building 

The length in feet of the building 
side fronting on the street. Only 
one building side may be used as 
sign frontage. (5/2/88) 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw by 
adding a new Section 16. AQUIFER PROTECTION DISTRICT , the full text of 
which is available for examination at the Town Hall and the Public 
Library, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted u nanimously that the Zoning Bylaw be 
amended by adding the new Section 16. AQUIFER 
PROTECTION DISTRICT as set out in the Planning 
Board report, except that in Section 16.2.15 
AQUIFER PROTECTION DISTRICT, second sentence, the 

239 



words, "derived from" shall be deleted and the 
words, "shown on" shall be added. 



SECTION 16 
AQUIFER PROTECTION DISTRICT 



16.1 PURPOSE 

The purpose of the Aquifer Protection District is to preserve and 
maintain the quality and quantity of the existing and potential 
groundwater supply within the known aquifers of the Town by 
protecting the groundwater and groundwater recharge areas from 
adverse land use practices. 

16.2 DEFINITIONS 

The following definitions apply to specialized words and terms 
associated with this District: 

16.2.1 Aquifer : 

A geologic formation composed of rock, sand 
and/or gravel that contains significant amounts of 
potentially recoverable water. 

16.2.2 Primary Aquifer Zone : 

An area of generally stratified glacial deposits, 
predominantly sand and gravel, exhibiting moderate 
to high permeability, favorable for location of 
wells capable of yielding 300 gallons per minute 
or more, as shown on the Hedfield Zoning Hap. 

16.2.3 Well Protection Zone: 

Land within 2000 feet of a public well or 

wellpoint, as shown on the Hedfield Zoning Hap, 

unless otherwise determined by the Board of 
Appeals. (See Section 16.3.1) 

16.2.4 Area of Influence: 

The ground surface area which experiences drawdown 
by a pumping well. 

16.2.5 Groundwater: 



The subsurface water present in aquifers and 
recharge areas. 



16.2.6 Recharge Area: 



An area of porous, permeable geologic deposits, 
especially, but not exclusively, deposits of 
stratified sand and gravel ("stratified drift") 
through which water from any source drains into an 



240 



16.2.13 



aquifer, including any wetland or body of surface 
water surrounded by or adjacent to such area, 
together with the watershed of any such wetland or 
body of surface water. 



16.2.7 Process Waste: 



Nondomest i c , nontoxic, nonhazardous, liquid or 
solid waste by-products associated with the 
manufacture or preparation of a product, including 
but limited to hardware, dry goods, foodstuffs and 
printed material . 



16.2.8 Sanitary Waste: 



Wastewater arising from ordinary water use from 
toilets, sinks and bathing facilities, and 
containing such concentrations and types of 
pollutants as are considered normal domestic 



wastes. 
16.2.9 Leachable Waste: 



Waste material, including solid waste, sewage, 
sludge and agricultural waste, that is capable of 
releasing water-borne contaminants to the 
surrounding environment. 



16.2.10 Solid Waste: 



Useless, unwanted or discarded solid material with 
insufficient liquid content to be free flowing. 
This includes but is not limited to rubbish, 
garbage, scrap materials, junk, refuse, inert fill 
material and landscape refuse. 



16.2.11 Hazardous Material: 



A substance or combination of substances, 
including any liquid petroleum product, that, 
because of quantity, concentration or physical, 
chemical or infectious characteristics, poses a 
significant present or potential hazard to water 
supplies or to human health if disposed of into or 
on any land or water in the Town of Medfield. Any 
substance deemed a "hazardous waste" in 
Massachusetts General Laws, Ch 21C as amended, 
shall also be deemed a hazardous material for 
purposes of this bylaw. 



16.2.12 Im pervious Surface: 



Material that does not allow significant amounts 
of surface water to penetrate into the soil. 



The deposit, injection, dumping, spilling, 
leaking, incineration or placing of any substance 



241 



into or on any land or water so that such 
substance or any constituent thereof presents a 
hazard to the groundwater. 



16.2.14 In.iection: 



The placement of fluids into the ground by gravity 
or greater pressure though a well or wells, 
including all of those described in the following 
State regulations as amended: 310 CMR 27.03, 
Classes I through V, and further described in 310 
CMR 27.08. 



16.2.15 Aquifer Protection District: 

A district shown on the Zoning Map of the Town of 
Medfield superimposed on all other zoning 
districts in the Town, consisting of groundwater 
protection areas, including Well Protection Zones 
and Primary Aquifer Zones. The Primary Aquifer 
Zone's delineation is shown on the "Primary 
Aquifer" overlay map dated July 10, 1987 by Amory 
Engineers, P.C. The Primary Aquifer Zone's 
delineation is derived from the following 
sources: 

(a) United States Geologic Survey Atlas 
HA-554 . 

Hydrology and Water Resources of the Charles River 
Basin: 

(b) USGS Atlas HA- 484. Hydrology and Water 
Resources of the Neponset and Weymouth River 
Basins; and 

(c) Water Supply Protection Atlas, prepared by 
the Massachusetts Department of Environmental 
Quality Engineering. 

16.3 ESTABLISHMENT OF AQUIFER PROTECTION DISTRICT 

For the purposes of this bylaw, there is hereby established within 
the Town of Medfield an Aquifer Protection District consisting of 
Well Protection Zones (Zone 1) and Primary Aquifer Zones (Zone 2) 
as delineated on the Zoning Map of the Town of Medfield. 

16.3.1 Determination of Location in Well Protection Zone 

Any owner of, or other party interested in, land 
within 2000 feet of a public well may apply to the 
Board of Appeals for a determination that the land 
is not located within the area of influence of the 
well. If such a determination is made, the land 
is deemed not to be in the Well Protection Zone. 
At the request of the owner the Town may engage a 
qualified professional geologist, hydrogeologist 
or engineer trained and experienced in 



242 



hydrogeology to assist in determination of the 
location of the applicant's property In relation 
to the area of influence. The Town may charge the 
applicant for all or part of the cost of the in- 
vestigation. 

16.3.2 Determination of Location in Primary Aquifer Zone 

Where the boundaries of the Primary Aquifer Zone 
as delineated are in doubt or in dispute, the 
burden of proof shall be upon the owner of, or 
other party interested in, the land in question to 
show where they should properly be located. At 
the request of the owner the Town may engage a 
qualified professional geologist, hydrogeologist 
or engineer trained and experienced 1n 
hydrogeology to assist in determination of the 
location of the applicant's property in relation 
to the Primary Aquifer Zone. The town may charge 
the applicant for all or part of the cost of the 
investigation. 

16.4 ESTABLISHMENT OF USE REGULATIONS 

The Aquifer Protection District is superimposed over all other 
districts established by this Bylaw. Only those uses specifically 
allowed by these Use Regulations and also allowed in the 
underlying district by other provisions of this Bylaw are 
permitted in the Aquifer Protection District. 

16.5 USES IN WELL PROTECTION ZONE (ZONE 1) 

16.5.1 Permitted Uses in Zone 1 

The following uses are permitted in the Well 
Protection Zone, provided that all necessary 
permits, orders and approvals required by local, 
state and federal law also are obtained. 

(a) Conservation of soil, water, plants and 
wi ldlife; 

(b) Outdoor recreation including boating, 
fishing, nature study and hunting where otherwise 
legally permitted. 

(c) Foot, bicycle and horse paths and bridges; 

(d) Normal operation and maintenance of existing 
water bodies, dams, splashboards and other water 
control, supply and conservation devices; 

(e) Any residential construction connected to the 
Town sewer system; 

(f) Construction of a single-family residence on 
a lot of more than two acres by Special Permit 
from the Board of Appeals (see Section 16.7); 



243 



(g) Non-Intensive fanning, gardening, nursery, 
conservation, forestry, harvesting and grazing 
uses, provided that hazardous materials are not 
used except in quantities normally associated with 
household use; 

(h) Necessary public utilities or facilities if 
designed so as to prevent contamination of 
groundwater. 

16.5.2 Prohibited Uses in Zone 1 

The following uses are prohibited in the Well 

Protection Zone: 

(a) Any use prohibited in Zone 2; 

(b) Underground storage tanks, septic tanks 
except as permitted by Section 16.5.1 (f), and 
pipelines and injection wells; 

(c) Storage of liquid petroleum products of any 
kind except those normally associated with 
operating a residence, and except for storage of 
fuel in a free-standing container within a 
building for the heating of that building; 

(d) Storage of hazardous materials; 

(e) Disposal of leachable wastes; 

(f) Disposal of solid waste other than brush, 
leaves and grass clippings, or stumps; 

(g) Storage of road salt or other deicing 
chemicals; 

(h) Industrial and commercial uses; 

(i) Outdoor storage of fertilizers, herbicides 

and pesticides, and outdoor uncovered storage of 

manure; 

(j) Animal feedlots; 

(k) Use of hazardous material in cleaning septic 
systems; 

(1) Disposal of sept age waste; 

(m) Any other use which involves as a principal 
or accessary activity the manufacture, storage, 
use, handling, transportation or disposal of 
hazardous materials except in quantities normally 
associated with operating a single-family 
residence. 

16.6 USES IN PRIMARY AQUIFER ZONE (ZONE 2) 

16.6.1 PERMITTED USES I N ZONE 2 

244 



All uses permitted in a Well Protection Zone, and 
the following uses, are permitted in a Primary 
Aquifer Zone provided that all necessary permits, 
order and approvals required by local, state and 
federal law also are obtained; 

(a) Commercial uses limited to retail, shopping 
and business or professional offices on lots of 
less than 40,000 square feet; 

(b) Industrial and commercial uses other than as 
set out in Section 16.6.1 (a), by Special Permit 
from the Board of Appeals (see Section 16.7); 

(c) Residential development of single-family 
dwellings on lots of at least 40,000 square feet 
in area; 

(d) Any residential development permitted in the 
underlying district which is connected to the Town 
sewer system. 

16.6.2 Prohibited Uses in Zone 2 

The following uses are prohibited in a Primary 
Aquifer Zone: 

(a) Underground storage of hazardous materials; 

(b) Injection wells of any kind, as defined by 
310 CMR 27.03, except by Special Permit from the 
Board of Appeals; 

(c) On site disposal of hazardous materials; 

(d) Disposal of leachable wastes other than from 
a residential septic system or the Medfield sewer 
system; 

(e) Any use which involves as a principal or 
accessory activity the manufacture, storage, use, 
handling, transportation or disposal of hazardous 
materials except by Special Permit from the Board 
of Appeals; 

(f) Uncovered storage of road salt or deicing 
chemicals; 

(g) Disposal of snow that contains deicing 
chemicals and that has been brought in from 
outside the District; 

(h) Industrial uses that discharge water 
containing process waste on site; 

(i) Automotive and boat service, washing and 
repair shops; 

(j) Junk and salvage yards; 
245 



(k) Dry cleaning establishments; 

(1) Metal plating or etching; 

(m) Chemical and bacteriological laboratories. 

16.7 USES BY SPECIAL PERMIT FROM THE BOARD OF APPEALS 

In addition to those uses otherwise permitted by the Aquifer 
Protection District Bylaw, and not otherwise prohibited by this 
Zoning Bylaw, the following uses may be permitted in the Aquifer 
Protection District by Special Permit from the Board of Appeals in 
accordance with Section 14 and any additional conditions specified 
hereunder: 

16.7.1 Construction of a single-family residence in Zone 1 

with on-site septic system on a lot of more than 
two acres, 

16.7.2 Commercial and industrial uses, provided that: 

(a) No more than 40% of the lot is rendered 
impervious; 

(b) Roof, parking and drive runoff is recharged 
on site to the maximum extent practicable as 
determined by the Board; 

(c) The runoff from the parking and drive areas 
shall be discharged to petroleum trap catch basins 
with appropriate sumps prior to recharge; 

(d) There shall be no manufacturing, storage, 
handling, use or transportation of hazardous 
wastes as defined in MGL Ch. 21C as amended; and 

(e) Hazardous material other than hazardous waste 
may be store, handled, used or transported only 
upon conditions imposed by the Board of safeguard 
the Underground water supply. 

16.7.3 The Application of Pesticides 

for use that are non-domestic and 
non-agricultural, provided that all necessary 
precautions shall be taken: 

(a) To prevent hazardous concentrations of 
pesticides in the water and on the land within the 
Primary Aquifer Zone as a result of such 
application, such precautions to include, but not 
be limited to, erosion control techniques, the 
control of runoff water (or the use of pesticides 
having low solubility in water); 



246 



(b) To prevent the volatilization, redisposition 
and lateral displacement (I.e. windrift) of 
pesticides; 

16.7.4 The Application of Fertilizers 

for uses that are non-domestic and non-commerical 
provided that; 

(a) Such application shall be made in such a 
manner as to minimize adverse impacts on surface 
water and groundwater due to nutrient transport 
and deposition or sedimentation. 

16.7.5 Injection wells. 

16.7.6 Additional Requirements 

16.7.6.1 In addition to the requirements of Section 14. 
each application under this section shall include 
the following information: 

(a) A complete list of all chemicals, pesticides, 
fuels, and other hazardous materials to be used, 
handled or stored on the premises in quantities 
greater than those associated with normal 
household use, accompanied by a description of 
measures proposed to protect all storage 
containers/ facilities from vandalism, corrosion 
and leakage, and to provide for control of spills; 

(b) A description of hazardous wastes to be 
generated, indicating storage and disposal 
methods; 

(c) Evidence of approval by the Massachusetts 
Department of Environmental Quality Engineering 
(DEQE) of any industrial waste treatment or 
disposal system or any wastewater treatment system 
where such approval is required. 

16.7.6.2 In addition to the requirements of Section 14, the 
Board of Appeals shall refer copies of the 
application to the Conservation Commission, the 
Water and Sewerage Board, the Building Inspector 
and the Hazardous Waste Committee, which shall 
review, either jointly or separately, the 
application and shall submit their recommendations 
to the Board of Appeals. Failure to make 
recommendations within thirty-five days of the 
referral of the application shall be deemed lack 
of opposition. 

16.7.6.3 In addition to the findings required under Section 
14, prior to issuing a Special Permit under this 
Section 16 the Board shall also find that the 
proposed use: 

(a) Is in harmony with the purpose and intent of 
247 



this bylaw and will promote the purposes of the 
Aquifer Protection District; 

(b) Is appropriate to the natural topography, 
soils and other characteristics of the site to be 
developed; and 

(c) Will not, during construction or thereafter, 
have an adverse environmental impact on a primary 
aquifer or recharge area. 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to amend the official Zoning of 
the Town of Medfield by changing from Residential Urban district to Busi- 
ness district the following parcel of land and the building thereon (82 
North Street), situated on the Westerly side of North Street, and the 
Northerly side of Cottage Street in said Medfield, bounded and described 
as follows: 

Beginning at the Southeasterly corner of the granted premises on the 
Northerly side of said Cottage Street at its intersection with said 
North Street; 

WESTERLY on said Cottage Street, one hundred twenty six (126) feet 
and four (4) inches, more or less, to an iron pipe in the 
ground at land now or formerly of Bertha M. Laverty, 
etals; thence turning and running 

NORTHERLY bounded Westerly by said other land now or formerly of 
said Laverty, et als, in part and in part by land now 
or formerly of Clyde Turner, ninety seven (97) feet and 
three (3) inches, more or less, to the Southwesterly 
corner of land now or formerly of Eleanor W. Sager; 
thence turning and running 

EASTERLY bounded Northerly by said land now or formerly of 
Eleanor W. Sager, one hundred thirty four (134) feet 
and four (4) inches, more or less, to said North 
Street; and thence turning and running 

SOUTHERLY by said North Street, eighty four (84) feet, more or 
less, to the point of beginning. 

Said premises are conveyed subject to and together with the benefit of 
all rights, restrictions and easements of record, insofar as same may now 
be in force and applicable. 

For title to said premises see deed from Angus L. Power et ux dated 
September 20, 1965, recorded with Norfolk Deeds Book 4292, Page 53. 



(Petition) 



VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. (5/2/88) 



ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to amend the official Zoning 
Map of the Town of Medfield by changing from Residential Suburban 
district to Residential Urban district the following parcel of land on 
the northerly side of Dale Street and the easterly side of North Meadows 
Road (Route 27), the parcel of land described as follows: 

Beginning at a point, said point of tangency on the northerly 
sideline of Route 27, said point being located 212.88 feet 
northwest of the point of tangency at the intersection of Route 27 
and Dale Street thence: 



248 



Running on the northerly sideline of Route 27 N69-02-49W a 
distance of 350.16 feet thence: 

Turning and running by land of the town of Medfield (Highway 
Department) N48-25-35-E a distance of 380.65 to a stone bound, 
thence: 

Turning and running by land of Town of Medfield (Sewer Department) 
S-61-17-45E a distance of 272.62 to a stone bound, thence: 

Turning and running by land of the town of Medfield S-29-00-50W a 
distance of 33.30 feet to a stone bound thence: 

Turning and running by land of Mozer S-16-47-30-W, a distance of 
191.06 feet to a point thence: 

Turning and running by land of Mozer S-64-12-23-E a distance of 
27.00 feet to a point, thence: 

Turning and running by land of Mozer S-51-14-19-E, a distance of 
98.00 feet to a point thence: 

Turning and running along the existing zone line the R.U. 
District, S-51-14-19-E a distance of 45.18 to the westerly 
sideline of Dale Street thence: 

Turning and running on the westerly sideline of Dale Street by a 
curve to the right with a radius of 670.00 feet a distance of 4.48 
feet to the point of curvature at Route 27 thence: 

Turning and running on the northerly sideline of Route 27 by a 
curve to the right with a radius of 50.00 feet a distance of 73.48 
feet thence: 

Turning and running on the northerly sideline of Route 27 by a curve 
to the left With a radius of 1850.00 feet, a distance of 212.88 
feet to the point of beginning. 

(Petition) 
VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. (5/2/88) 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to amend the official Zoning 
Map of the Town of Medfield by changing from Residential Suburban 
district to Residential Urban district the following parcel of land on 
the northerly side of Dale Street and the easterly side of North Meadows 
Road (Route 27), the parcel of land described as follows: 

Beginning at a point, said point of tangency on the northerly 
sideline of Route 27, said point being located 212.88 feet 
northwest of the point of tangency at the intersection of Route 27 
and Dale Street thence: 

Running on the northerly sideline of Route 27 N69-02-49W a 
distance of 350.16 feet thence: 

Turning and running by land of the Town of Medfield (Highway 
Department) N48-25-35-E a distance of 380.65 to a stone bound 
thence: 



249 



Turning and running by land of Town of Medfield (Sewer Department) 
S-61-17-45E a distance of 272.62 to a stone bound, thence 

Turning and running by land of town of Medfield (Sewer Department) 
S-61-17-45-E a distance of 64.87 feet to the existing zone line 
(R.U. District) thence: 

Turning and running along the zone line S-19-33-50-W, a distance 
of 108.42 feet thence: 

Turning and running along the zone line by a curve to the right 
with a radius of 550.00 feet thence: 

Turning and running by land of Mozer on the existing zone line 
S-51-14-19-E, a distance of 75.59 feet thence: 

Turning and running along the existing zone line the R. U. 
District, S-51-14-19-E, a distance of 45.18 to the westerly 
sideline of Dale Street thence: 

Turning and running on the westerly sideline of Dale Street by a 
curve to the right with a radius of 670.00 feet a distance of 4.48 
feet to the point of curvature at Route 27 thence: 

Turning and running on the northerly sideline of Route 27 by a 
curve to the right with a radius of 50.00 feet a distance of 73.48 
feet thence: 

Turning and running on the northerly sideline of Route 27 by a 
curve to the left with a radius of 1850.00 feet, a distance of 
212.88 feet to the point of beginning. 

(Petition) 
VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. (5/2/88) 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Assessors to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the 
reduction of the Tax Rate for Fiscal 1989, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. (Board of Assessors) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $600,000 be transferred 
from Free Cash for the reduction of the Tax Rate 
for Fiscal 1989. (5/2/88) 

The following articles were then presented for reconsideration: 

Article 12. Voted to table Article 12 on 4/26/88 until 5/2/88. On 5/2/88 
voted unanimously to remove it from table at which time Article 12 was 
passed. (See Article 12 Vote, page ) (5/2/88) 

Article 25. Reconsideration of Article 25, which had been voted in the 
affirmative on 4/26/88, failed. (5/2/88) 

Article 35. Reconsideration of this article, which failed at 4/26/88 
meeting, was defeated. (5/2/88) 

NEW MOTION: That the sum of $21,500 be raised and 
appropriated to purchase a one year option to buy 
the property described in Article 25. 



249A 



VOTE: Voted that the sunt of $21,500 be raised and 
appropriated to purchase a one year option to buy 
the property as described In Article 25. 
(5/2/88) 

Meeting was dissolved at 10:45 P.M. 



Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 



250 



ARTICLE 



RECAP OF APPROPRIATION ARTICLES 

1988 TAX LEVY TRANSFER BORROW 



16 General Gov't. $5,388,542. 
Tri Valley Voc. Tech 109,908. 
Town Schools 7.576.090. 

13,074,540. 



17 Capital Budget: 328,319. 
Transfer: 

State Hwy. Funds -30,000. 

Hwy. Eq. Art. 16 ATM 1985 -12,549. 

Hwy. Eq. Art. 16 ATM 1986 -7,451. 
Land Damages Farm St. 

Art. 23 ATM 1982 -13,800. 

Sch.Roof Art. 21 ATM 1984 -21,200. 
South St. Bike Path, 

Art. 21 of ATM 1984 -20,000. 
Transfer Station Funds 

Art. 22 ATM 1984 -49,639. 



13,073,017.06 
173,680.00 



21 


Medical Expenses 


10,000. 


22 


Land Acquisition 




25 


Sewer 




26 


Sludge 


150,000. 


27 


Treatment Plant 250.000. 
Art. 15 STM 1970 


95,700. 


28 


Sewer Infiltration Study 


10,000. 


29 


Household Waste Day 


4,000. 


30 


Christmas Lights 


2,000. 


34 


Pond 


50,000. 


35 


1 Yr. Option on Barletta land 


21,500. 


37 


Police Budget 5,000. 


FREE CASH 


38 
39 


Cemetery 15,000. 
Highway 


FREE CASH 



Transfer: 

FROM: Acct. 110-04 20,270.17 
FROM: Art. 18 ATM 1987 3,893.99 
TO: 1987 Highway 110-04 200 Operations 



(Revenue Sharing) 
-1,522.94 

154,639. 



1,000,000 
2,670,000 



154,300 



24,164.16 



TOTAL APPROPRIATION 



1988 TAX LEVY 



TRANSFER 



BORROW 



17. 614 .523.1 6 13.589.897.06 3 34.626.16 3.670.000 



251 



ATTORNEY GENERAL'S APPROVAL July 28, 1988 

Boston, Massachusetts 

The foregoing amendments to the general by-laws adopted under articles 
7 and 9 of the warrant for the Medfield Annual Town Meeting that 
convened April 25, 1988, are hereby approved. 

The foregoing amendments to the zoning by-laws adopted under articles 
40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46 and 47 of the warrant for the Medfield 
Annual Town Meeting that convened April 25, 1988, are hereby approved. 

The within zoning map pertaining to article 47 of the Warrant for the 
Medfield Annual Town Meeting that convened April 25, 1988, is hereby 
approved. 

/s/James M. Shannon 



252 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR STATE PRIMARY 
September 15, 1988 



Norfolk , ss 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in Primaries to vote at Precincts 1, 2, 3 and 4 at the 
Memorial School, Adams Street, on Thursday, the Fifteenth Day of 
September, 1988 from 6:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following 
purpose : 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the candidates 
of political parties for the following officers: 

U.S. SENATOR . For the Commonwealth 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS . . " " 4th Congressional District 

COUNCILLOR ..." " 2nd Councillor District 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT. ..." "1st SUFFOLK & NORFOLK 

Senatorial District 
REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT. . 13th NORFOLK Representative 

District 

CLERK OF COURTS For NORFOLK County 

REGISTER OF DEEDS. . " NORFOLK District 

COUNTY COMMISSION " NORFOLK County 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 26th day of July 1988. 

/s/ Ann B. Thompson 
/s/ Robert J. Larkin 
/s/ Harold F. Pritoni 

SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



Norfolk, ss 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



August 9, 1988 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in 
elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, by 
posting attested copies of said warrant in not less than five 
public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven days before 
the time of holding the meeting. 



A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

/s/Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 



/s/ John Garvey 

CONSTABLE OF MEDFIELD 



253 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
STATE PRIMARY ELECTION 
September 15, 1988 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 
A.M. with the reading of the warrant and the swearing in of the 
election workers present. The ballot boxes were inspected and 
found to be in working order, speciman ballots posted, voting 
list was displayed and instructions to the voters were posted. 

The following workers were assigned to their precincts: 

WARDEN: Mabelle Maguire 

CLERK: Anna Murphy 

PRECINCTS 1, 2, 3 and 4: Mary MairEtienne, Adelaide Cochrane, 
Gale Rad, Margaret O'Brien, Joan Bussow, Dorothy Sumner, David 
Wilmarth, Emma Mitchell. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 578, 217 Republicans and 361 Democrats 
voting. There were 9 Republican absentee ballots and 5 
Democratic absentee ballots. Total Registered Voters numbered 
6042, 6% of the voters voting. 

DEMOCRATIC BALLOTS PRECINCTS 1, 2, 3, 4. 



TOTAL 
SENATOR IN CONGRESS, Vote for ONE 

Edward M. Kennedy 270 

Blanks 91 



361 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS, Vote for ONE 

Fourth District 

Barney Frank 275 

Blanks 86 



361 



COUNCILLOR, Vote for ONE 
Second District 

Christopher A. Iannella, Jr. 238 

Blanks 123 



361 



254 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT, Vote for ONE 
First Suffolk & Norfolk District 

Arthur Joseph Lewis, Jr. 

Stephen J. Casey 

Robert J. Gallagher 

Blanks 



130 

124 

87 

20 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, Vote for ONE 
Thirteenth Norfolk District 

Lida Eisenstadt Harkins 

Blanks 



361 



292 

69 



CLERK OF COURTS, Vote for ONE 
Norfolk County 

Nicholas Barbadoro 

Blanks 



361 



233 
128 



REGISTER OF DEEDS, Vote for ONE 
Norfolk County 

Barry T . Hannon 

Blanks 



361 



246 
115 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Vote for not more than TWO 
No rf oik County 

James J. Collins 

George B. McDonald 

Ma ry P . Collins 

Blanks 



361 



175 
130 
170 
247 



255 



722 



REPUBLICAN BALLOTS 



PRECINCTS 1 , 2, 3, 4 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS, Vote for ONE 
Joseph D . Malone 
Blanks 



197 
20 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS, Vote for ONE 
Fourth District 

De bra R . Tucker 

Blanks 



217 



191 
26 



217 



COUNCILLOR, Vote for ONE 
Second District 

Paul E . Downey 

Blanks 



186 

31 



217 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT, Vote for ONE 
First Suffolk & Norfolk District 

Christopher M. Lane 

Blanks 



206 
1 1 

217 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, Vote for ONE 
Thirteenth Norfolk District 

Ellen M . Canavan 

Blanks 



199 

18 

2TT 



CLERKS OF COURT, Vote for ONE 
Norfolk County 

Scattered 

Blanks 



3 
214 

2TT 



REGISTER OF DEEDS 

No rf oik County 

Scattered 
Blanks 



1 
216 



217 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Vote for not more than TWO 
Norfolk County 

Blanks 



217 



BALLOT COUNTERS: Nancy Franke, Patricia Rioux, Eleanor Anes and 
Leonard Anes. Mary MairEtienne, Adelaide Cochrane, Gale Rad, 
Margaret O'Brien, Joan Bussow, Dorothy Sumner, David Wilmarth, 
Emma Mitchell, Mabelle Maguire, Anna Murphy. 

After the results were announced, the ballots, checked voting 
lists and tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for 
safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



/a/Nancy J. Preston, 

TOWN CLERK 



256 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR STATE/PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 
November 8, 1988 



No rf oik , ss 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified 
to vote in Elections to vote at Precincts 1, 2, 3 and 4 at 
Memorial School, Adams Street, on Tuesday, the eighth day of 
November, 1988 from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following 
pu rpose : 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the 
candidates for the following offices: 

ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT . For the Commonwealth 

U. S. SENATOR For the Commonwealth 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS . . . For the Congressional District 

COUNCILLOR Councillor District 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT Senatorial District 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT. ." " Representative District 

CLERK OF COURTS " " County 

REGISTER OF DEEDS " " District 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER " " County 

QUESTIONS 
#1 - INCREASED SALARIES FOR CERTAIN STATE OFFICIALS 
#2 - REPEALING THE PREVAILING WAGE LAW 
#3 - REGULATING THE TREATMENT OF FARM ANIMALS 
#4 - STOPPING ELECTRIC POWER PLANTS THAT PRODUCE NUCLEAR WASTE 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 25th day of October 1988. 

Ann B. Thompson 
Robert J. Larkin 
Harold F. Pritoni 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 
Norfolk, ss 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in 
elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, by 
posting attested copies of said warrant in not less than five 
public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven days before 
the time of holding the meeting. 

/s/ George W. Kingsbury 
A TRUE COPY ATTEST: CONSTABLE OF MEDFIELD 

/s/Nancy J. Preston, TOWN CLERK October 26, 1988 



257 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
STATE/PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 
November 8, 1988 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 
A.M. with the reading of the warrant and the swearing in of the 
election workers present. The ballot boxes were inspected and 
found to be in working order, speciman ballots posted, voting 
list was displayed and instructions to the voters were posted. 

The following workers were assigned to their precincts: 

WARDEN: Elmer Portmann 

PRECINCT 1: Mary MairEtienne Adelaide Cochrane 

Edith O'Toole Mabelle Maguire 

PRECINCT 2: Beverly Hallowell Emma Mitchell 

Nancy Munroe Margaret O'Brien 

David Wilmarth 
PRECINCT 3: Anna Murphy Gale Rad 

Priscilla Anderson Joan Bussow 

Lorraine Holland 
PRECINCT 4: {Catherine Buchanan Barbara Connors 

Eleanor Anes Dorothy Sumner 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 6003, including 372 absentee ballots. Total 
registered voters numbered 6657, 90.3/5 of voters voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results 
we re as follows : 

PRECINCT 

12 3 4 TOTAL 
ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT 

AND VICE PRESIDENT, Vote for ONE 

Bush and Quayle 799 815 943 877+1 3434+1 

Dukakis and Bentsen 573 578 658 632 2441 

Fulani and Dattner 3 2 3 1 9 

Paul and Marrou 7 2 10 14 33 

Blanks 18 20 23 25 86 



1400 1417 1637 1549+1 6003+1 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS, Vote for ONE 

Edward M. Kennedy 741 762 821 831 3155 

Joseph D. Malone 625 623 776 692+1 2716+1 

Mary Fridley 6 8 6 20 

Freda Lee Nason 6 4 4 14 

Blanks 22 32 28 16 98 



1400 1417 1637 1549+1 6003+1 



258 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS, Vote for ONE 
Fou rth District 

Barney Frank 

De bra R . Tucker 

Blanks 



785 


802 


922 


835 


3344 


563 


572 


670 


678+1 


2483+1 


52 


43 


45 


36 


176 



1400 1417 1637 1549+1 



6003+1 



COUNCILLOR, Vote for ONE 

Second District 

Christopher A . Iannella , J r. 566 
Paul E. Downey 676 

Blanks 158 



604 
669 
144 


648 
828 
161 


593 

809+1 

147 


241 1 
2982+1 
610 



1400 1417 1637 1549+1 



6003+1 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT, Vote for ONE 

First Suffolk & Norfolk District 

Arthur Joseph Lewis, Jr. 340 349 354 345 1388 
Christopher M. Lane 952 973 1174 1103+1 4202+1 
Blanks 108 95 109 101 413 



1400 1417 1637 1549+1 



6003+1 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, Vote for ONE 
Thirteenth Norfolk District 

Ellen M. Canavan 

Lida Eisenstadt Harkins 

Paul G . Brauer 

Blanks 



378 


435 


552 


506 + 1 


1871+1 


530 


515 


553 


547 


2145 


423 


418 


453 


431 


1725 


69 


49 


79 


65 


262 



1400 1417 1637 1549+1 



6003+1 



CLERK OF COURTS, Vote for ONE 

Norfolk County 

Nicholas Barbadoro 900 
Blanks 500 



912 
505 



1045 
592 



995 
554 + 1 



3852 
2151+1 



1400 1417 1637 1549+1 



6003+1 



REGISTER OF DEEDS, Vote for ONE 

Norfolk County 

Barry T. Hannon 890 

Blanks 510 



919 
49 



1057 
580 



996 
553+1 



3862 
2141 +1 



1400 1417 1637 1549+1 



6003+1 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Vote for not more than TWO 

Norfolk County 

James J. Collins 725 757 843 

Mary P. Collins 618 627 717 

Blanks 1457 1450 1714 



2800 2834 3274 



828 
700 
1570+2 


3153 
2662 
6191 +2 


3098+2 


12006+2 



259 



QUESTION I 
Yes 
No 
Blanks 



227 250 285 262 
1137 1131 1312 1256+1 
36 36 40 31 



1400 1417 1637 1549+1 



1024 

4836+1 
143 



6003+1 



QUESTION II 
Yes 
No 
Blanks 



738 


734 


904 


808 


3184 


638 


649 


703 


71 1 +1 


2701 +1 


24 


34 


30 


30 


1 18 



1400 1417 1637 1549+1 



6003+1 



QUESTION III 
Yes 
No 
Blanks 



339 346 

1028 1033 

3 38 



407 393 
1200 1105+1 
30 51 



1485 

4366+1 
152 



1400 1417 1637 1549+1 



6003+1 



QUESTION IV 
Yes 
No 
Blanks 



402 


358 


399 


378 


1537 


981 


1035 


1214 


1146+1 


4376+1 


17 


24 


24 


25 


90 



1400 1417 1637 1549+1 



6003+1 



BALLOT 

Cochrane 

David Wi 

Bussow, 

Butler, 

Plank, 

Finn , J 

Ment ze r , 

Gi bbs , 

Brewer, 

Rogers, 



COUNTERS: 
Mabell 

lmarth , A 
Katherin 
Beverly 

Pat ric ia 

essie Po 
Ba r ba ra 

Judy Cahi 
Ma rgue ri 

and James 



H 
e H 

nna 
e Bu 

Smi 
Riou 
rtma 

A rm 
11, 
te E 

Pre 



ary Mai 
agui re , 
Murphy , 
chanan , 
th , Es 
x , Nan 
nn , Sa 
st rong , 
Timothy 
ppich , 
s ton . 



r Etie 
Emma 
Gale 
Elean 
telle 
cy Fra 
die C 
Shie 
Larki 
Linda 



nne , 

Mite 
Rad , 
or An 
Vansl 
nke , 
a rson 
la Ro 
n , Ja 
V i rgi 



Edi 
hell 
Pris 
es , 
et te 

Leo 
, A 

y. 

cque 
lio , 



th O'T 
, Ma r 
cilia 
Doroth 

» J ea . 
nard A 
nn Me 
C lai re 
line D 
I ren 



oole , 
garet 
Ande rs 
y Sumn 
n Cla 
nes , 
nt ze r , 
Bouin 
avis , 
e ' To 



Adelaide 

O'Brien, 

on , Joan 

er , Jean 

rk, Judy 

Gerald ine 

Geo rge 

Edythe 

Patricia 

ole , Nan 



After the results were announced, the ballots, checked voting 
lists and tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for 
safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



/a/Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 



260 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1988 



261 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



COMPARATIVE 
1987, 



1987 



D 

2) 
3) 
4) 
5) 



C lass 

Residential 
Open Space 
Comme rcial 
Industrial 
Personal 



Total Real and Personal 



FINANCIAL REPORT 
1988, 1989 

Parcel Count 

3184 

239 

104 
41 

137 
3705 



Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 



1 988 



1) 
2) 
3) 
4) 
5) 



C lass 

Res iden t ial 
Open S pace 
Commercial 
Indust rial 
Personal 



Total Real and Personal 

Tax Levy 

ve rlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 



3252 

226 

137 

42 

145 

3802 



1989 



D 
2) 
3) 
4) 
5) 



C lass 

Residential 
Open Space 
Comme re ial 
Industrial 
Pe rsonal 



Total Real and Personal 



Parcel Coun t 

3264 

220 

177 
51 

155 
3867 



Tax Levy 
Overlay 

T«x Rate ppr thousand all classes 



Valuation 

$445 ,546,900.00 

6,495,250.00 

19,278,150.00 

15,672,100.00 

5,587,951 .00 

492,580,351 .00 

7,314,818.21 

66,307.21 

14.85 



$456,999,350.00 

5,61 1 ,951 .00 

21 ,218,550.00 

17,236,050.00 

6,1 17,900.00 

507,183,801 .00 

7,937,426.49 

80,564 .40 

15.65 



Va lua t ion 

$742,635,550.00 

$ 15,157,800.00 

34,686,000.00 

26,316,900.00 

6,938,203.00 

825,734 ,453-00 

8,442 ,491 .42 

1 27 ,698.^6 

10.20 



262 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



REAL ESTATE TAXES RECEIVABLE 



Pe rsona 1 P 


rope rty 




Real 


Estate 


Taxes 


Lew of 






Lew 


of 




1988 


$1 


,589.81 


1988 






$1 1 1 ,838.93 


1987 




313.71 


1987 






17,103.62 


1986 




453.33 


1986 






8,396.14 


1985 




525.63 


1985 






3,213.12 


1984 




408. 1 


1984 






1 ,623.80 


1983 




402.50 


1983 






1 ,689-97 


1 982 




343-32 


1982 






1 ,975.97 


1981 




145.72 


1 981 
1980 
1979 
1978 






1 ,443-31 
2,623.85 
2,525.60 
1 ,221 .43 



TOTAL BALANCE $4,182.12 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 
Lew of 



1988 


$163,039.41 


1987 


13,859-97 


1986 


4,419-86 


1985 


1 ,493.73 


1984 


1 ,843.03 


1983 


1 ,052.35 


1982 


602.25 



TOTAL BALANCE $186,310.60 



Water Liens Added to Taxes 
Lew of 



1988 
1987 
1986 



$ 



896.00 

490.00 

93-03 



TOTAL BALANCE $ 1,479-03 



TOTAL BALANCE $153,655-74 

Apportioned Sewer Betterments 
Lew of 



1988 
1987 
1986 
TOTAL BALANCE 



$ 



253-75 

103-90 

63-74 

421 .39 



Apportioned Water Betterments 
Lew of 



1979 
1978 



$ 



182.74 
395-41 



TOTAL BALANCE $ 578.15 

Sewer Liens Added to Taxes 
Lew of 



1988 
1987 



$ 336-33 
460.01 



TOTAL BALANCE $ 796.54 

Respectfully submitted, 

Nancy J. Preston 
COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



263 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
BALANCE SHEET 
JUNE 30,1988 



GENERAL FUND DEBIT CREDIT 



Cash $2,723,777 

Deposits in Transit $10,162 



Total Cash k Deposits in Trans $2,733,939 



Personal Property 

Current Year $1,590 

Prior Years $2,305 



Real Estate 

Current Year $108,685 

Prior Years $40,303 

Prepaid Taxes ($1,893) 



Other Taxes 

Agricultural !< Horticultural $11 

Forestry $54 

Pecreat l on $1 , 367 



$3,895 



$147,095 



$1,432 

Total Taxes $152,422 

Provision for Abatements & Exemptions 

Current Year $34,060 

Prior Years $186,207 

Reserve for Uncollected Taxes l$67,845i 

$152,422 

Tax Liens Receivable $68,518 

Reserve for Uncollected Tax Liens $68,518 

Motor Vechicle Excise Taxes 

Current Year $164,056 

Prior Years $25,370 



$189,426 
Reserve for Uncol Motor Excise Tax $189,426 

Departmental Receivables: 

Ambulance $25,2^0 

Reserve for Uncol Departmental Rec $25,220 

Apportioned Betterments Added to Tax: 

Water $578 

Sewer $874 

Committed Interest $1,260 



$2,7 12 
Reserve for Betterments AadedTa>. $2,712 

Water 1 Sewer Receivables: 

Water Rates $43,611 

Water Services $o,482 

Water Liens Added to Taxes $1,027 



Total Water Receivables $51,11" 

Reserve for Water Receivables $31,120 

SewerRates $24,062 
Sewer Use - Medfield State Hospital 15,655 
Septic Waste Charges $9,581 

Sewer Installers Permit Fees $727 



264 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
BALANCE SHEET 
JUNE 30,1966 



Sewer Liens Added to Taxes 



Reserve f or Sewer Receivables 

Agency Payables: 
Federal Income Tax 
Norfolk County Retirement Withold. 
Life Insurance Witholdings 
Additional Voluntary Lite Ins With 
Health Insurance Witholdings 



Tailings (Unclaimed Items) 

Guarantee Deposits 

Treasurer s Tax Title 
Col 1 ector ' s Ta>: Title 

Reserved Fund Balances: 

Reserve for Over (Under ) Assessments 
Reserve for Appropriation Deficits 
Reserve for Encumbrances 
Reserve for Planned Budget Deficit 

Total Reserved Fund Balances 

Unreserved Fund Balance 



1690 



140,735 



(f 89) 



$40,735 

$26 

$2 

$174 

$1,470 

$11,279 

$12,951 

$13,742 

$3,690 

$11,429 
$2,973 

($2) 
($16,453) 
$1,116,176 
$600,000 

$1,699,723 

$989,431 



TOTALS - GENERAL FUND 



$3,264,092 $3,264,092 



SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 

Due from General Fund 

Federal : 

Revenue Sharing 
Ambul ance 

Total Federal 

State: 

Energy Conservation 

Public Works - Highway Up Front 

Chapter 90 - Highway 

Arts Lottery 

Elderly Grants 

Right-to-Know 

Suicide Prevention 

Census Grant 

Library Grants 

Water Pollution Chemicals 

School : 

Drug Free Schools 

Chapter I ECIA 

Title I 

Title VIB 

Title VIB 



$382, 106 



(94-142) 

Earlv Childhood 



School Improvement 
Total State 



Revolving: 

School Tuition 
5 c h o o 1 Lunch 
School Custodian 
Adui t Educ at l on 
School Athletics 



uetai i 



$1,523 
$1 ,000 



*•) e-o-r 

+ i. | J s. o 



$8 


,485 


$229 


,670 


$i 


,436 


$4 


,625 


$11 


,166 


$1 


,094 


$1 


,187 


$1 


,201 


$3 


,062 


$5 


■? C i. 


$3 


,569 




$453 


$6 


,479 




$915 




$669 



$279,807 



$i ,u40 

$ b , 19 4 

$ i 7,099 

$17,686 

$8,211 



265 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
BALANCE SHEET 
JUNE 30,1988 



Park & Recreation 
Police Detail 

Total Revolving 

Reserved for Appropriation: 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 

Total Reserved for Approp. 

Other Special Revenue: 

Gift Accounts 
Fine Arts 
Art Gallery 
Corning Library 
Town Common 
Library Bicentennial 
Li far ar y Bui 1 di ng 
Library Gift 
Ambul ance 
Sel ec tmen 
Town Meeting 
Conser vat 1 on 
Care of Animals 
Corning Best Way 
Outreach 

Pari & Recreation 
Mi seel 1 aneous 

Cable Access 

Premi urn/ Interest Accrued on Loans 

Total Other Special Revenue 

TOTALS - SPECIAL REVENUE 

TRUST FUND 

Cash 

In Custody of Treasurer 
Pension 
Conser vat l on 
Stabi 1 1 zat i on 

Gloria Lynn Library Scholarship 
Librarv Trusts 
Granville Dailey Library 
Cemetery Perpetual Care 
Special Unemployment Insurance 
Group Health Insurance 
Library Income Expendable 
Cemetery Perpetual Care Expendable 

Total in Custody of Treasurer 

In Custody of Board of Selectmen 
Moses Ellis Post G. A.R. 
Ant l qui t l es 
Trice ntennial 

Total in Custody ot Selectmen 

In Custody ot School Committee 
Essay 

Total in Custody of School Com 

Total Trust Funds 



TOTAl FUND BALANCES 



$1,088 

($545) 



$382,106 



$1,393,848 



$50,775 

$13,760 

$13,760 



$3,117 

$132 

$33 

$100 

$200 

$23 
$6 ,37 3 

$601 

$4 

$75 

$430 

$371 

$570 

$76 

$354 

$130 

$18,233 

$4,419 

;35,241 

$382,106 



$799 


,089 


$22 


,389 


$75 


,950 


$9 


,709 


$11 


,654 


$75 


,52© 


$256 


.618 


$83 


,728 


$38 


,957 


$3 


,108 
$566 .' 


(i 



$1 ,393,646 
$5 ,040,046 



$l,37t>, 162 



$10,271 
$4,123 
$1,081 

$15,475 



$2,211 

$2,21 1 
$1 ,393,848 



$5,040,*.' 4& 



266 



TOWN TREASURER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

STATEMENT OF CASH 

Receipts Fiscal 1988 - 

Including Investments $13,917,841.86 

Disbursements Fiscal 1988 - 

Including Investments $13,748,557.71 

Cash in Banks June 30, 1988 - 

Including Savings/Money Market 

Accounts $2,999,554.65 

STATEMENT OF INVESTMENTS 

Stabilization Fund $ 75,949.93 

Pooled Investment Fund 221 ,843.94 

Investments June 30, 1988 $ 297,793.87 

Total Cash, Savings and 
Investments June 30, 1988 $3 ,297 ,348.52 

STATEMENT OF INTEREST RECEIVED ON SAVINGS/INVESTMENTS 

General Fund $ 198,767.68 

Stabilization Fund 5,141.78 

Federal Revenue Sharing Fund 598.19 

Pooled Investment Fund 1 4 ,581 .28 

Total Interest received Fiscal 1988 $ 219,088.93 

STATEMENT OF FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING FUND 

Total Cash, Savings and 
Investments June 30, 1987 $ 41,281.61 

Interest received Fiscal 1988 598. 1 9 

Total Revenue Sharing Fund Fiscal 1988 "~" " $ 41,879.80 

Transferred to General Fund - 
Voted Annual Town Meeting, April 1987 (40,356.86) 

Voted Annual Town Meeting, April 1988 ( 1 ,522.94) 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments June 30, 1988 $ 0.00 

The foregoing is a record of cash, investments and interest 
earned for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1988. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward F. Barrett, Jr. 
TOWN TREASURER 



267 



June 30, 1988 
OUTSTANDING DEBT ACCOUNTS 
Net Funded or Fixed Debt 
Outside Debt Limit: 



Elm Street (Wheelock) School 
Sewers - Longmeadow 
Street Sewers & Construction 
Mount Nebo Water Tower 

Inside Debt Limit: 

Noon Hill Land Acquisition 
Refuse Transfer Station 

TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

Balance June 30, 1988 

Funds in Custody of Town Treasurer: 

Li bra ry : 

Granville F, Dailey Trust 

Library Trust Funds 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 

Stabilization Fund 

Conservation Fund 

Re t i remen t Fund 

Special Unemployment Compensation 

Fund 
Group Insurance Fund 
Gloria Gillis Lvnn Fund 



Funds in Custody of Selectmen: 

Moses Ellis Post /M 1 7 G.A.R. 
Medfield Antiquities Trust 
Tri-Centennia 1 Trust 



Funds in Custody of School: 
Essay Fund Account. 



$1 ,635,000.00 



$ 85,000 
50,000 

660,000 
300,000 



40,000 
500,000 



1 ,095 ,000.00 

> 540,000.00 
$1 ,391 ,305.15 



$ 75,526.92 
1 1 ,653-50 

256,617.54 
75,949.93 
22,388.90 

799,089.15 

83,728.02 

38,956.51 

9,709.00 



1 ,373,619.47 



10,270.51 
4,122.37 
1 ,081 .4 1 



15 ,474 .29 



2 ,2 1 1 .39 



268 



PERPETUAL CARE 



Eve D. Shepherd $ 200.00 

William & Kathleen Connors 1,200.00 

G ranchelli-Hennessey 200.00 

Francis J. McCormack 2,000.00 

Frank Simonetti 1 ,000.00 

Herbert & Rose Burr 200.00 

Pauline M. Goucher 350.00 

Winslow H. Crocker, Sr. 200.00 

Helen M. McGonagle 800.00 

Kilmer-Farren 600.00 

Zozula 10.00 

Joseph & Florence Keris 400.00 

Vincent & Sylvia Bready 400.00 

Dorothy C. Folino 2,000.00 

Robert & Lillian Mozer 800.00 

Charles DePari 800.00 

Barbara Gallerani 800.00 

Lillian Lee 400.00 

Herman & Rita Erichsen 1,000.00 

Pasquale & Louise Pini 800.00 

Eugene & Mary Lovell 800.00 

Virginia P. Yarlott 200.00 

George & Mary Plimpton 200.00 

Henry & Susan Martin 200.00 

Carol D. Vietze 200.00 

Richard & Susan Mastronardi 400.00 

William G. Duhaime 800.00 

Richard & Kathleen Fiske 600.00 

Charles & Marilyn Commander 1 ,200.00 

Joseph & Jacquelyn Daugherty 200.00 

Rose C. Wallace 800.00 

Robert & Amelia Kennedy 800.00 

Audrey M. Henry 500.00 

Robert & Virginia Couper 400.00 

Charles S. Lewitt 200.00 

Robert H. Fraser, Jr. 100.00 

Wilbert & Mary Lannon 200.00 

Percy F. Cashen 400.00 

Renee Blaney 200.00 

Mary H. Trayte 200.00 

Suzanne Emery 200.00 

Pascal & Cecile Levesque 1,200.00 

Kevin & Julie Pallis 800.00 

John & Marion Fratolillo 800.00 

Bradley C. Munroe 400.00 

Hennessey-Pellet ie r 400 .00 

GRAND TOTAL $26,560.00 



269 



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271 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL 

TOWN MEETING 

1989 



272 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL 
TOWN MEETING - 1989 



Norfolk, as. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said 
County, greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote 
in elections and in Town affairs, to meet at the Memorial 
School, in said Medfield, on Monday, the Twenty-seventh day of 
March, A.D., 1989 at 6:00 o'clock A.M., then and there to act on 
the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be 
elected annually by ballot, viz: 

One Moderator and one member of the Board of Trustees of the 
Public Library for one year. 

One Collector of Taxes, one Selectman, one Assessor, two members 
of the School Committee, two members of the Board of Trustees of 
the Public Library, two Park Commissioners, all for three years. 

One member of the Planning Board and one member of the Housing 
Authority, both for five years. 

BALLOT QUESTION: 

1. Shall the town distribute to its insured employees, after 
deducting the town's total administrative cost, the balance of 
any group insurance dividend which shall be based upon the 
employees' proportionate share of the total premiums paid for 
all insurance coverages? 

( ] Yes [ ] No 

The polls will be open at 6:00 o'clock A.M. and shall be closed 
at 8:00 o'clock P.M. 



On Monday, the twenty-fourth day of April, A.D., 1989, commenc- 
ing at 7:30 o'clock P.M. the following articles will be acted on 
in the Amos Clark Kingsbury School gymnasium in said Medfield, 
viz : 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the re- 
ports of the several Town Officers for the past year. 



273 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning July 1, 1989, in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue 
a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew 
any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year in accordance with General Laws,- Chapter 44, Section 17. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector 
to use all means in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer 
might if elected to that office. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Treasurer and Collector to enter into compensating balance 
agreements during fiscal year 1990 as permitted by Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53F, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Treasurer and Collector) 

ARTICLE 6, To see if the Town will vote to accept the fol- 
lowing named sums as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots 
in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest thereof as may be neces- 
sary for said care, viz: 

Eve D. Shepherd $ 200. 

William & Kathleen Conners 1200. 

Granchelli - Hennessey 200. 

Francis J. McCormack 2000. 

Frank Simonetti 1000. 

Herbert & Rose Burr 200. 

Pauline Goucher 350. 

Winslow H. Crocker 200. 

Helen M. McGonagle 800. 

Kilmer - Farren 600. 

Zozula 10. 

Josephine & Florence Keris 400. 

Sylvia & Vincent Bready 400. 

Dorothy C. Folino 2000. 

Robert & Lillian Mozer 800. 

Charles DePari 800. 

Barbara Gallerani 800. 

Lillian Lee 400. 

Herman & Rita Erichsen 1000. 

Pasquale & Louise Pini 800. 

Eugene & Mary Lovell 800. 

Virginia P. Yarlott 200. 

George & Mary Plimpton 200. 

Susan & Henry Martin 200. 

D. Carol Vietze 200. 

Richard & Susan Mastronardi 400. 

William G. Duhaime 800. 

Richard & Kathleen Fiske 600. 

Charles & Marilyn Commander 1200. 

Joseph & Jacquelyn Daugherty 200. 

Rose C. Wallace 800. 

Robert & Amelia Kennedy 800. 

Audrey M. Henry 500. 

Robert & Virginia Couper 400. 



274 



Charles S. Lewitt 
Robert H. Fraser, Jr. 
Wilbert & Mary Lannon 
Percy F. Cashen 
Renee Blaney 
Mary M. Trayte 
Suzanne Emery 
Pascal & Cecile Levesque 
Kevin & Julie Pallis 
John & Marion Fratolillo 
Bradley C. Munroe 
Hennessey - Pelletier 

Total 





200. 




100. 




200. 




400. 




200. 




200. 




200. 




1200. 




800. 




800. 




400. 




400. 


$26 


,560. 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the fee 
schedule for Town Clerk's fees set out in Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 262, section 34, clauses 1- 79, the schedule being 
available in the Clerk's office and posted on the Town bulletin 
board, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Clerk) 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary 
and compensation of the following elected officers: Moderator, 
Town Clerk, Treasurer, Selectmen, Assessors, School Committee, 
Trustees of the Public Library, Collector of Taxes, Park and 
Recreation Commission, Planning Board, Housing Authority, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Person- 
nel Administration Plan, effective July 1, 1989, to read as fol- 
lows: 

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 

SALARIED POSITIONS Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 



Police Department 
Police Sergeant 
Police Officer 
Specialist Range 
Dog Officer 



27,578 28,688 30,079 
21,653 23,172 24,954 

350 
19,482 



26,612 



31,282 

27,676 

1,000 

21,232 



Police Officers designated as Detective, Prosecutor, or 
Photographer/Fingerprinter by the Police Chief shall receive ad- 
ditional compensation annually at a rate to be determined by the 
Police Chief within the above Specialist Range. In the absence 
of a police sergeant being on duty, the senior of f icer-in-charge 
of any shift shall be paid an additional $3.50 per shift. 

G. Police Officers : For all regularly scheduled shifts starting 
after 3:00 p.m. and finishing prior to 8:00 a.m., a night shift 
differential of $4.00 per shift will be paid, said sum to be 
paid annually during the month of June. 



275 



TOWN MANAGERIAL POSITIONS 



Minimum Midpoint Maximum 



Streets / Water and Sewer Department 



Supt. of Public Works 

Police Department 
Chief 

Fire Department 
Chief 

Executive Departments 
Town Administrator 
Administrative Assistant 

Library 
Director 

Other Salaried Position 

Board of Health 
Detached Social Worker 



35,640 
38,880 
34,020 



43,200 
25,920 



25,920 



44,280 



47,520 



42,120 



54,000 
31,320 



31,320 



52,920 



56,160 



50,220 



64,800 
36,720 



36,720 



20,869 



26,100 



Hourly Positions 

Library 

Children's Librarian 

Reference Librarian 

HOURLY PAID POSITIONS 



8.36 
8.36 



10.43 
10.43 



11.43 
11.43 



Grade Minimum Wage 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 



$3.55 



Minimum 


2nd Step 


3rd Step 


4th Step 


Maximum 


5.50 


5.77 


6.08 


6.39 


6.75 


5.77 


6.08 


6.39 


6.75 


7.08 


6.08 


6.39 


6.75 


7.08 


7.48 


6.39 


6.75 


7.08 


7.48 


7.86 


6.75 


7.08 


7.48 


7.86 


8.26 


7.08 


7.48 


7.86 


8.26 


8.70 


7.48 


7.86 


8.26 


8.70 


9.16 


7.86 


8.26 


8.70 


9.16 


9.64 


8.26 


8.70 


9.16 


9.64 


10.17 


8.70 


9.16 


9.64 


10.17 


10.69 


9.16 


9.64 


10.17 


10.69 


11.29 


9.64 


10.17 


10.69 


11.29 


11.85 


10.17 


10.69 


11.29 


11.85 


12.48 


10.69 


11.29 


11.85 


12.48 


13.13 


11.29 


11.85 


12.48 


13.13 


13.83 


11.85 


12.48 


13.13 


13.83 


14.56 


12.48 


13.13 


13.83 


14.56 


15.29 


13.13 


13.83 


14.56 


15.29 


16.06 



Lower rates as authorized by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
may dlso be paid. 



276 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 



GRADE 1 

Swimming Instructor 
Lifeguard Instructor 

$1,319. minimum per season 
Playground Counselor 
Lifeguard 

$1,098. minimum per season 

GRADE 2 

Intern /Trainee 

GRADE 3 

Laborer 

GRADE 4 

Library Assistant 

Clerk Typist 

Cemetery Foreman 

Mini-bus Driver, Council on Aging 

GRADE 5 

Skilled Laborer 

Executive Director, Council on Aging 

GRADE 6 

Senior Library Assistant 
Secretary 

GRADE 7 

Co 1 1 ec tor /Bookkeeper / Secretary 
Police Matron 
Skating Supervisor 
Traffic Supervisor 

GRADE 8 

Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 9 

Senior Secretary 
Truck Driver 
Special Police Officer 
Permanent Intermittent 
Police Dispatcher 
Call Firefighters 

GRADE 10 
Presently no jobs 



GRADE 11 

Light Equipment Operator 
Administrative Secretary 
Municipal Buildings 
Custodian 

GRADE 12 

Wastewater Treatment 

Plant Operator 
Heavy Equipment Operator 
Water Technician 
Ground skeeper 

GRADE 13 

Equipment Operator 

Repairman 
Finance/Data Processing 

Supervisor 

GRADE 14 

Senior Groundskeeper 
Tree Warden/Insect Pest 

Control 
Senior Heavy Equipment 

Operator 
Senior Water Technician 
Senior Wastewater 

Treatment Operator 

GRADE 15 

Assistant Wastewater 

Treatment Plant 
Opera tor- in-Charge 
Sr. Equipment Operator 

Repairman 

GRADE 16 
Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 17 

Street /Water /Sewer 

Foreman 
Wastewater Treatment 
Plant Operator-in-Charge 

GRADE 18 

Senior Wastewater 
Treatment Plant 

Operator-in-Charge 
Senior Foreman 



277 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 



PART TIME/TEMPORARY 



Animal Inspector 
Waterfront Director 
Assistant Waterfront Director 

Deputy Collector 
Ambulance E.M.T. 
Assistant Dog Officer 

Fire 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Youth Coordinator 

Police Intern 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Town Counsel 

Tree Climber 

Veteran's Agent 

Inspectors 

Inspector of Buildings 

Local Inspector of Buildings 

Gas Inspector 

Assistant Gas Inspector 

Plumbing Inspector 

Assistant Plumbing Inspector 

Wiring Inspector 

Assistant Wiring Inspector 

Health Agent 

Street Inspector 

Zoning Enforcing Officer 



$1,074 per year 

$3,063 to $3,997 per year 

$190 to $262 per week 

$1,648 minimum per season 

Fee 

$12.50 per hour 

$1,575 per year 



$1,629 per year 

$ 559 per year 

$ 414 per year 

$ 414 per year 

$3,462 per year 

$233 to $307 per week 

$312 per year 

$752 per year 

$1,322 per year 

$14,474 to $24,680 per year 

$6.70 to $10.83 per hour 

$3,885 per year 



inspection 
imum $2,997, 
imum $ 401, 
imum $ 826, 
imum $ 150, 
imum $2,447 
imum $ 561, 
imum $1,362 
imum $ 401 

inspection 
hour 

inspection 



$15.48 


per 


Annual 


Min 


Annual 


Min 


Annual 


Min 


Annual 


Min 


Annual 


Min 


Annual 


Min 


Annual 


Min 


Annual 


Min 


$15.48 


per 


$8.13 per 


$15.48 


per 



(Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Person- 
nel Administration Plan Classification of Positions and Pay 
Schedule by adding a position under: 



OTHER SALARIED POSITIONS : 
Executive Department Minimum 
Town Accountant 



M idpoint 
29,000 



24,000 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 



Maximum 



34,000 



278 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Person- 
nel Administration Plan Classification of Positions and Pay 
Schedule by adding the following position under SPECIAL RATE/FEE 
POSITIONS, as follows: 

Personnel Administrator $12,000 to $17,000 per year 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Person- 
nel Administration Plan, effective July 1, 1989, SECTION XV. 
SPECIAL PAY PROVISIONS, section H. Police Details : as follows: 

"The detail rate for Special and Permanent Intermittent 
Officers shall be $18. per hour." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Person- 
nel Administration Plan, effective July 1, 1989, SECTION XIII. 
LEAVES OF ABSENCE, Paragraph A. Sick Leave, Sub-paragraph 2.: as 
follows: 

2. An employee in continuous employment shall be credited 
with the unused portion of sick leave granted under subsection 
(1.) up to a maximum of one hundred twenty (120) days. Upon re- 
tirement or death, payment shall be made to the employee or the 
employees estate for 25% of those days accumulated over sixty 
(60) days. 

And to see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Adminis- 
tration Plan, effective July 1, 1989, SECTION XIII. LEAVES OF 
ABSENCE, by adding a new Paragraph, E.: as follows: 

E. PERSONAL LEAVE. 

For those full time employees with vacation accruals of less 
than 21 days per year, upon completion of 30 days regular 
full-time employment, employees shall be allowed one third (1/3) 
of one day personal time off with pay for each completed month 
of service during which the employee used no sick leave allow- 
ance. Such personal time must be taken within 1 year of being 
earned, and scheduled with the approval of the individual's su- 
pervisor. 

(Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
and/or transfer from available funds sums of money requested by 
the Selectmen or any other Town Officer, Board, Commission and 
Committee to defray operating expenses of the Town for the fis- 
cal year commencing July 1, 1989, or such other sums as the Town 
may determine as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 
108, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



279 



ARTICLE 15. To see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate 
on the fiscal 1989 tax levy and/or transfer from available funds 
for Capital Expenditures including the following: 



Department 
School 



Planning 

Park & Recreation 
Town Hall 
Highway 



Police 

Animal Control 

Sewer 

Library 
Cemetery 



Item 

Stage Curtain/Wheelock 

Memorial School Drainage 

Alarm System/Wheelock 

Survey Middle School Roof 

Storage Area 

Exterior Paint/Memorial 

Entry Repairs/Memorial 

Truck 

5 Exterior Doors/Dale 

10 Exterior Doors/Memorial 

Develop High School Field 

Oil Tank/Dale 

Asbestos Removal 

Geographic Information 
System 

Repairs Meetinghouse Pond 

Handicapped Ramp 

Bridge St. Drainage 

Adams St. Drainage-School 

Harding/West Streets 

Drainage 

Spring St. Resurface 

Marlyn/Pheasant Drainage 

Resurface Subdivisions 

Roller 

Lawnmower 

Compactor 

Mack Truck 

Cruiser Replacement 

Dog Van 

Weight Scales/Waste Water 
Treatment Plant 

Minuteman Network 

Cemetery Expansion 



and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the School Committee be 
further authorized to contract with and otherwise treat with any 
federal and state agencies for reimbursement of the cost of any 
capital expenditures; and that the Board of Selectmen and th^ 
School Committee respectively be authorized to trade or sell 
toward part of the purchase price, the following: 



280 



Trade or sell: 
Department 
School 
Highway 



Police 



Trade In or Sell 

1977 GMC Truck 

1970 Roller 

1977 Heckendorn Lawnmower 

1976 GMC Truck 

Tree Sprayer 

1987 Crown Victoria 



Animal Control 1980 Chevy Van 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Capital Budget Committee) 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to propose an amend- 
ment to the Town Charter as follows: 

By adding to Section 3-3 Appointments , the words 
"a single individual to be both Treasurer and Collector in ac- 
cordance with the Town By-Laws" after the words "the town coun- 
sel" in the first sentence; and 

by deleting from Article 6. Other elective of- 
fices H b. The treasurer for a term of three years" and "e. The 
collector of taxes for a term of three years" and by 
redesignating the remaining paragraphs so that they are in al- 
phabetical order. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to add to the Town 
Bylaws Article XIV. Street Naming as follows: 

In order for a street to be accepted as a public way by the 
Town of Medfield, it must first bear a name that has been 
chosen from a list developed for and approved by the 
Medfield Board of Selectmen. The street name is also sub- 
ject to all other preconditions such as approval by police 
and fire chiefs. 

The street listing will be developed and updated yearly by 
the Committee to Study Memorials with input from the 
Medfield Historical Commission. The list will be pre- 
sented to the Planning Board which will also reserve the 
right to add any name to the list as they see fit. 



281 



The list will be made available to the Medfield Planning 
Board and any developer. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Committee to Study Memorials) 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to amend the bylaws 
by adding Article XV. Historic Districts as follows: 

SECTION I. Title 

This By-Law shall be known and may be cited as the 
Historic Districts By-Law under the authority of Massachu- 
setts General Laws, Chapter 40C, as amended. 

SECTION 2. Purpose 

The purpose of this By-Law is to promote the educa- 
tional cultural, physical, economic and general welfare of 
the public through the preservation and protection of the 
historical assets of Medfield, including building, sites 
and districts of historical and architectural interest; 
through the maintenance of such landmarks of the history of 
Medfield, the Commonwealth and the Nation, and through the 
development of appropriate uses and settings for such 
buildings and places. 

SECTION 3. Historic District Boundaries 

John Metcalf District - Main Street Historic District. 

The boundaries are hereby established as shown on the 
maps, filed with the Medfield Planning Board and with the 
Massachusetts Historical Commission on February 17, 1989, 
which accompanies and is hereby declared to be a part of 
the By-Law. 

SECTION 4. Membership of the Historic District Commission 

The Medfield Historic District Commission, herein af- 
ter referred to as the District Commission, shall consist 
of five (5) members and alternates appointed by the Select- 
men . 

The membership of the District Commission shall be 
made up as follows: 

One member from two (2) nominees submitted by the 
Medfield Historical Society 

One member, if possible, from two (2) nominees submit- 
ted by the Chapter of the American Institute of Architects 
covering the area; 

One member, if possible, from two (2) nominees submit- 
ted by the Massachusetts Board of Realtors; 

One member, if possible, from two (2) nominees submit- 
ted by the Medfield Planning Board. 



282 



If the membership cannot be appointed as designated 
above, these positions shall be filled without designation. 

Two (2) additional members without designation. 

All nominees shall be residents of the Town of 
Medfield. 

One member, if possible, shall be a resident of or 
owner of real estate in the John Metcalf Historic Dis- 
trict. 

When the District Commission is first established, two 
(2) members shall be appointed for one (1) year term, two 
(2) members shall be appointed for two (2) year terms, and 
the remaining members and the two (2) alternates shall be 
appointed for three (3) year terms, and all members shall 
serve until a successor is appointed and confirmed. At the 
expiration of their terms, the Selectmen shall appoint suc- 
cessors for three (3) year terms in the manner described in 
the preceding paragraphs. Vacancies for any unexpired term 
shall be filled in the same manner as in the original ap- 
pointment. 

The District Commission shall elect annually a Chair- 
man and Vice-chairman from its own number and a Secretary 
from within or without its number. 

Alternates shall have all the powers and duties of 
regular members when called to serve by the Chairman or 
Vice-chairman of the Commission. 

All members and alternates shall serve without compen- 
sation. 

SECTION 5. Definitions 

As used in this By-Law the following words and phrases 
shall include the meanings indicated below: 

(A) The word "altering" shall include the terms "re- 

building", "reconstructing", "restoring", 
"removing", and "demolishing". 

(B) The word "constructing" shall include the terms 

"building", "erecting", "installing", "enlarg- 
ing", and "moving". 

(C) The word "building" shall mean a combination of 
materials forming a shelter for persons, animals 
or property. 

(D) The word "structure", shall mean a combination 
of materials other than a building, including 
but not limited to a sign, fence, wall, terrace, 
walk or driveway, tennis court and swimming 
pool . 

(E) The words "exterior architectural feature" shall 
mean such portion of the exterior of a building 
or structure as is open to view from a public 
street, public way or public park, including but 
not limited to the architectural style and gen- 
eral arrangement and setting thereof, the kind 
and texture of exterior building materials, or 



283 



other materials applied to exterior surface and 
the type and style of windows, doors, lights, 
signs and other appurtenant exterior fixtures. 

(F) The word "District" shall mean the John Metcalf 
Historic District. 

(G) The word "Commission" shall mean the Medfield 
Historic District Commission acting as such. 

SECTION 6. Administration of Historic Districts 

No building or structure within the Historic District 
shall be constructed, demolished, moved or altered in any 
way that affects exterior architectural features and no 
building shall be moved into an Historic District unless 
the Commission shall first have issued a Certificate of ap- 
propriateness, a Certificate of hardship or a Certificate 
of non-applicability with respect to such construction, al- 
teration or movement. The building inspector shall not 
issue a permit within an Historic District unless one of 
the certificates noted above has first been issued by the 
District Commission or the proposed improvement is exempted 
from these provisions by Section 7. 

SECTION 7. Exemptions to Review 

The authority of the District Commission is not ex- 
tended to the review of the following: 

(1) Temporary structures of signs, subject, however 
to such conditions as to duration of use, loca- 
tion, lighting, removal and similar matters as 
the Commission may reasonably specify. 

(2) Terraces or landscaping that does not substan- 
tially change the grade level. (Exception would 
be fencing that would be visible from the 
street. ) 

(3) Storm doors, storm windows, screens, window 
air-conditioners. 

(4) Color or type of paint or roofing. 

(5) Signs used for residential occupation or profes- 
sional purposes which are not more than one foot 
square in area, provided that, 

(A) only one such sign is displayed for each 
building or structure; 

(B) the sign consists of letters painted on 
wood without a symbol or trademark; and 

(C) if illuminated, is illuminated only indi- 
rectly . 

(6) Signs used in connection with non-residential 
purposes provided that, 

(A) all signs will conform with the existing 
sign By-Law. 



284 



(7) Reconstruction of a building, structure or exte- 
rior architecture; feature which has been dam- 
aged or destroyed by fire, storm or other disas- 
ter, provided that the exterior design is 
substantially similar to the original. 



Even though the preceding statements are listed as exemp- 
tions the Historic District Commission recommends that it 
be consulted in an advisory capacity to aid property owners 
in choosing cost effective and the most aesthetically 
pleasing materials to suit their needs for their Historic 
property. The Historic District Commission would like to 
be considered and given an opportunity to make recommenda- 
tions . 

SECTION 8. Power of the District Commission 

The District Commission shall have all the powers of 
an Historic District Commission as described in Chapter 40C 
of the Massachusetts General Laws. The Commission shall 
adopt rules and regulations for the conduct of its busi- 
ness, not inconsistent with Chapter 40C of the General 
Laws, or with the purpose of this By-Law. 

The District Commission may receive and accept appro- 
priations, grants and gifts for the furthering of the pur- 
poses of this By-Law. It may establish an historic marker 
program, publish guides, maps and other appropriate publi- 
cations to illustrate historical and architectural re- 
sources of Historic Districts and to acquire and maintain 
historic properties. 

The District Commission shall propose changes in 
Medfield Historic District boundaries as it deems appropri- 
ate. Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40C, will guide 
the procedures for these activities. 

SECTION 9. Duties of the District Commission 

The District Commission shall act at all times with a 
clear understanding of the need of the residents of a 
Medfield Historic District or Districts to enjoy the 
progress of contemporary life in the use of their homes and 
properties . 

The District Commission shall coordinate historic 
preservation activities, and oversee the preparation and 
implementation of historic preservation plans of Medfield. 

The District Commission shall provide informational 
assistance to owners of historic structures on matters per- 
taining to preservation of those structures in Medfield. 



285 



SECTION 10. Severability 

In case any section, paragraph or part of this By-Law 
be for any reason declared invalid or unconstitutional by 
any court of last resort, every other section, paragraph or 
part shall continue in full force and effect. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Historic District Study Committee) 

ARTICLE 19. To see of the Town will vote to authorize the Se- 
lectmen to acquire by purchase, eminent domain or otherwise, the 
parcel of land shown as parcel 36 on Medfield Assessors' Map 56 
off North Meadows Road, now or formerly owned by The Barletta 
Company, for public works facilities containing approximately 
16.5 acres; to see what sum the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate for this purchase and to determine whether said sum 
shall be raised by taxation, transfer from available funds or 
borrowing or otherwise, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto . 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 20. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate on the fiscal 1990 tax levy to be used in conjunc- 
tion with and in addition to any funds allotted by the Common- 
wealth for the construction, reconstruction and improvement of 
roads under the provisions of Section 34, Chapter 90 of the 
General Laws, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Superintendent of Public Works) 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the town will vote to amend the Town 
By-Laws, Article IV POLICE REGULATIONS, Section 24 by deleting 
the words "disabled and" from the first sentence, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public 
ways the following named streets, or parts thereof: 

Cranmore Road from Station 0+0 to 6+50 
Ledgetree Road from Station 0+20 to 11+23.04 
Wheelwright Road from Station 0+00 to 6+68.91 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans re- 
ferred to in the several Orders of Layout on file with the Town 
Clerk's office and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to ac- 
quire by eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, titles and 
easements, including drainage easements, as may be necessary to 
accomplish such purposes, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto . 

(Board of Selectmen) 



286 



ARTICLE 23. To see what sum of money the Town will appropri- 
ate for the purposes of Clause 32 of Section 5 of Chapter 40 of 
the Massachusetts General Laws for the payment of reasonable 
hospital, medical, surgical, nursing, pharmaceutical, prosthetic 
and related expenses incurred by any member of its fire fighting 
force or any member of its police force as the natural and 
proximate result of an accident occurring, or of undergoing a 
hazard peculiar to his employment, while acting in the perfor- 
mance and within the scope of his duty without fault of his own, 
as provided in Section 100 of Chapter 41 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the purpose of conducting a Hazardous 
Household Waste Collection Day, or do or act anything in rela- 
tion thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the town will vote to accept the provi- 
sions of Chapter 767 of the Acts of 1987, amending Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 71, Section 7A to provide for state reim- 
bursement of the cost of transporting pupils to day care fa- 
cilities, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the town will vote to accept the provi- 
sions of M.G.L. Chapter 60A, Section 1, providing for the exemp- 
tion of former prisoners of war from certain motor vehicle ex- 
cise taxes, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the purpose of defraying the expenses 
of purchasing, erecting and removing holiday lights and decora- 
tions over public ways of the Town, or do or act anything in re- 
lation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 6.2.9 by eliminating the first paragraph and sub- 
stituting therefor the following: 

Screening and buffers shall be required in any 
portion of the Industrial Extensive (I-E) Dis- 
trict lying within 150 feet of a residential use 
or district and shall be landscaped as follows: 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 



287 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 6.2.10 by adding the words "or use" to the first 
sentence, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw by adding to Section 2, DEFINITIONS : 2.1.5 as follows: 

2.1.5 Bed and Breakfast 

A private owner-occupied residence with overnight 
accommodations for no more than six short-term paying 
guests and a common breakfast area for their use, but with 
no cooking facilities in the guest rooms; 

and by renumbering all remaining definitions so that they are in 
numerical order; and 

by adding to the Table of Use Regulations the following: 

5.4.4.34 Bed and Breakfast SP SP SP SP SP SP NO NO 

and by adding Section 14. 10. 6. b) (1) as follows: 

For Bed and Breakfast use there shall be no more than four 
rooms used as guestrooms; one off-street parking space must 
be provided for each guest bedroom plus two spaces for the 
owner-occupant; a 2 square foot sign shall be allowed; 

and by adding to Section 8.1 TABLE OF OFF-STREET PARKING STAN- 
DARDS the following: 

Bed and Breakfast One space for each guest bed- 

room plus two spaces for 
owner -occupant 

and by adding to Section 13.8 SIGN SURFACE AREA the following: 

13.8.7 c) A Bed and Breakfast use shall be al- 
lowed a two square foot sign. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 8.2.9, by adding after the word "Bylaw" in the 
first sentence the words "and drainage for same", or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 



288 



ARTICLE 32. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 5.4.4.1, by striking the present language and by 
inserting the following: 

Store selling retail items whose sale is not regulated 
elsewhere in this Section 5 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 5 USE REGULATIONS by adding Section 5.3.9 as fol- 
lows: 

Day Care Centers in residential districts must be occupied 
by the owner; 

and by adding to TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS , 5.4.2.12 the follow- 
ing: 

(See Section 5.3.9) 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 14.13 by adding after the word "approved" the 
words "and signed" in the first paragraph, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 12.7.1 by inserting after "per acre", the words 
"for which restoration could be required", or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 12.8.1.b) by deleting the first sentence and sub- 
stituting the following: 

All trees and brush are to be chipped on the site un- 
less removed for commercial purposes. Stumps are to 
be either chipped on the site or removed in accordance 
with DEQE regulations. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 






289 



ARTICLE 37. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 12.8.1.C) by deleting the present language and by 
substituting the following: 

All loam and subsoil must be bulldozed into piles for 
future respreading except that loam and subsoil lying 
below proposed impervious surfaces on a site may be 
removed in accordance with the provisions of this Sec- 
tion 12 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, by deleting Section 14. 10. 6. a) (1) in its entirety; and 
by adding Section 5.3.10 as follows: 

For use of a construction trailer during the course of 
a building construction program a permit may be issued 
for one year by the Building Inspector. No wheels, 
tires, or other means of keeping the construction 
trailer mobile shall be removed; any construction 
trailer shall have no skirts, porches, fences, or 
similar materials or equipment added which would de- 
tract from its mobility. Each construction trailer 
and its lot shall be subject to the requirements of 
the District; 

and by adding to 5.4.1.9 See Section 5.3.10 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 14.6 SPECIAL PERMIT TIME LIMITS by changing "six 
months" to "two years" in the first sentence. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw by adding under "Definitions" a new Section 2.1.38 and 
renumbering all remaining articles so that they are in numerical 
order . 

Section 2.1.38 Perfect Square 

A square, the dimensions of which are set out in 
the TABLE OF AREA REGULATION S for each zoning 
district, which must fit entirely within a lot 
and one side of which must coincide with or be 
tangent to or touch on two points the Front Lot 
Line . 



290 



and by adding a column, 
REGULATIONS as follows: 



Perfect Square", to 6.2 TABLE OF AREA 



Perfect Square** 
(ft.) 



R-E 
R-T 
R-S 
R-U 



One family dwelling 

Two-family dwelling 

Multi-family dwelling 

Public Housing for the Elderly 

Convalescent or nursing home 

Funeral home or mortuary establishment 

Any other permitted community facility 

Any other permitted structure or 

principal use 



180x180 

142x142 

96x96 

80x80 

100x100 

200x200 

200x200 

200x200 

200x200 

100x100 

100x100 



REGULATIONS as 



and by adding a footnote to 6.2 TABLE OF AREA 
f ol lows: 



** No structure shall be built on any lot in any Residen- 
tial Zoning District unless the lot is of sufficient size and 
shape to contain a perfect square, as defined in this bylaw, in 
accordance with the dimensions set out in Table 6.2 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum 
of $1500. appropriated in Article 18 of the 1987 Annual Town 
Meeting to defray the cost of improvements at McCarthy Park, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Park & Recreation) 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the town will vote to adopt the follow- 
ing resolution: 

"BE IT RESOLVED that it is the sense of this meeting 
that the public water supply for domestic use in this town 
should be flouridated; 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Health) 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Map of the Town of Medfield by changing from Residential Urban 
district to Business district lot 84 as shown on assessors plan 
37, located on the northeasterly side of Park Street contiguous 
to the existing Business district, or act in any other manner in 
relation thereto. 

(Petition) 



291 



ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town 
Bylaws by adding to Article IV, POLICE REGULATIONS, a new Sec- 
tion 28, Ail-Night Gas Stations. For the purpose of controlling 
and abating noise, no automobile service station within the town 
shall conduct business during the hours of 10:00 P.M. and 6:00 
A.M. or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Map of the town of Medfield by changing from Residential Urban 
district to Business district lot 127, as shown on the assessors 
map plan 43, located on the north westerly side of South Street, 
contiguous to two parking lots, or act in any other manner in 
relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Assessors to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the 
Treasury for the reduction of the Tax Rate for Fiscal 1990, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 



292 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an at- 
tested copy thereof in the usual place for posting warrants in 
said Medfield, seven days at least before the time of holding 
said meeting. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT, and make due return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of 
meeting, aforesaid. Given under our hands this seventh day of 
March in the year of our Lord One Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Eighty-nine . 

Ann B. Thompson 
Robert J. Larkin 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhab- 
itants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, 
to meet at the time and for the purpose named, by posting at- 
tested copies of the same at five public places seven days be- 
fore the date of the meeting, as within directed. 



Constable of Medfield 



Date 



293 



INDEX 



Page 

Town Officers Elected 6 

APPOINTMENTS BY: 

Board of Selectmen 9 

Assessors 22 

Fire Chief 22 

Board of Health 23 

Planning Board 24 

Moderator 23 

Tax Collector 22 

Town Accountant 22 

Town Clerk 22 

Personnel Board 24 

Treasurer 24 

DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Acquifer Protection Bylaw Committee 64 

Aging, Council on 70 

Ambulance Department 44 

Animal Control 45 

Animal Inspector 46 

Appeals on Zoning, Board of 63 

Arts, Council on 72 

Assessors, Board of 54 

Cable T.V. Committee 65 

Cemetery Commissioners 75 

Civil Defense Department 47 

Community Cable T.V. Access Corporation 67 

Conservation Commission 76 

Financial Management Study Committee 78 

Fire Department 48 

Hazardous Waste Committee 80 

Health, Board of 82 

Historical Commission 95 

Housing Authority 102 

Inspection Department. 92 

Library Trustees 106 

Medfield Prison Project Screening Committee 104 

Memorial Day Address 33 

Memorial Public Library 108 

Mosquito Control , Norfolk County Ill 

Open Space Planning Committee 112 

Park and Recreation commission 114 

Planning Board 56 

Police Depar tment 3'> 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 11H 

Selectmen, Board ol '2t. 

Streets. Water and Sewer .io 

I r ee and Insert Pest Control ... . 11/ 

294 



Page 
lri-County Regional Vocational Technical School. . . . . .119 

Veterans' Services 124 

Water and Sewer Department 51 

Youth Advisory 126 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Assistant Superintendent for Business Affairs 144 

Adult Education 167 

Amos Clark Kingsbury School 146 

Athletic Director .163 

Dale Street School 156 

Director of Buildings and Grounds 169 

Graduation Exercises, High School 149 

Medfield Middle School .154 

Pupil Services Department. 161 

Ralph Wheelock School 157 

School Committee 128 

School Lunch Program .168 

Superintendent of Schools 130 

Teachers' Directory .134 

TOWN CLERK'S RECORDS: 

Births 172 

Marriages 177 

Deaths . .181 

TOWN MEETING AND ELECTIONS: 

Warrant for Presidential Primary, March 8, 1988 184 

Annual Town Election, March 28, 1988 188 

Warrant and Proceedings, Annual Town Meeting 

April 25, 1988 .192 

Warrant for State Primary, September 15, 1988 253 

Warrant for State Election, November 8, 1988 257 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting, April 24, 1989 272 

FINANCIAL REPORTS: 

Assessors' Report. . .262 

Contracts for Professional Services. 270 

Perpetual Care 269 

Tax Collector 263 

Town Accountant 264 

Treasurer 267 

CREDITS/ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: 

The following people have contributed to the production of 
this report: Pauline M. Goucher , Dorcas 8. Owen, Norma J. 
Matczak, Linda Virgilio, Nancy S. Franke, and Beverly Bennotti . 
Thanks to all Department Heads and Chairpersons of all Boards, 
Committees and Commissions for" their reports. Special thanks 
to Walter M. Frank for the cover design. Printing: William R. 
Brown Company. Pictures: Suburban Press and Margaret L 
Bancrot t . 

295